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13

A hen aged between 20-28 weeks has a one in a hundred chance of laying a double yoked egg. Since all the eggs in a box usually come from the same flock and all the birds in the flock are the same age, if you find one double yolk, the probablity of finding more in the box is high. As double-yoked eggs are larger than single yoked, if the eggs are graded to be ...


13

Double-yolked eggs are the result of an anomaly in the egg generation process in the hen. They can happen in any breed of hen, on any feed. It is a result of two ova being generated at the same time, and then encapsulated in a single shell. According to My Pet Chicken, it happens more often with younger hens. I am not aware of any process to ...


4

The function of the chord, that is attached to the yolk, is to hold the yolk into place. To have the most uniform baking possible, you remove the chord. However, I never do. I keep it in with the rest of the whites and I've never had any problems with the finished products. So you can: toss it keep it with the yolk (a little bit of whites with the yolk is ...


4

According to my onetime teacher in Reproductive Biology at Oregon State University (Go Beavers!), Fred Menino, hens commonly lay multiple yolk eggs (I think the record is 9 yolks, but I may be mis-remembering) when young, before they are completely reproductively competent. To some degree this is a result of the selective breeding programs we (humans) have ...


4

Pumpkin pie is basically a custard, removing the yolks could change the texture of the pie. Yolks contribute both proteins and fats to the pie which are important for the structure of the filling as well as its creaminess/smoothness. In general, two whites can be used to replace one whole egg. Avoid whipping or over-mixing the filling to prevent making ...


4

Regarding Romanian recipe... Actually in Romania people tend not to use raw yolks so much. Most often we eat relatively raw yolks just in fried eggs or soft boiled eggs. In most of recipes the yolks are cooked. Regarding mayonnaise there are three ways of preparing it: using just raw yolks (most simple), using raw and cooked yolks 50-50, and using just ...


3

It's not an emulsion if there's not a liquid other than oil in the recipe. An emulsion is, by definition, a combination of two immiscible liquids such that droplets of one (the dispersed phase) are suspended in and surrounded by the other (the continuous phase). I don't read Romanian either, but there's got to be some sort of non-oil liquid in there, like ...


2

The mixture does indeed set in the fridge. It remains airier than the average tiramisu I've eaten (but I don't know what commercial tiramisu contains, probably not a foam based on raw yolks), but it is firm enough to hold its shape when served. If a piece is forgotten outside overnight, it becomes softer again and runs slightly, but properly stored, it is ...


2

I don't think there is any thing wrong with what you've made. Tiramisu is a relatively recent dessert (forget about the 'Tuscan trifle' which did not even include mascarpone) created at Harry's Bar in Venice. As such there are many variations: some drier, some boozier, some creamier and some wetter and your recipe may just produce a wetter variety. Take in ...


2

I think you could have got away with the 55°C if you had let the yolks cool down before adding the cheese. I usually heat the yolks+sugar in a bain-marie, rather than directly; I never really measured the temperature, but I doubt it would be much higher than that. I think the further addition of cream probably did more harm than good... next time put only ...


2

Your recipe doesn't specify 55°C, and I'd be surprised if 5–8 minutes over barely simmering water only gets that hot. Indeed, checking for sources: McGee, in On Food and Cooking, says: When the temperature reaches 120°F/50°C, high enough to unfold some of the yolk proteins, the mix thickens, traps air more efficiently, and begins to expand. As the ...


2

I would like to contribute though unfortunately I have no source material besides my own experience. I have come to this question from a search for what to call a sauce made from cooked egg yolk, water, and oil since most definitions of mayonnaise define it as an emulsion from raw eggs. You can make an emulsion using cooked yolk. I use the yolks from hard ...


2

I think you're looking for shrimp with egg yolk sauce. Egg yolk sauce is simply a kind of thick mayonnaise which gets dropped on fried (or deep fried, or grilled) shrimp. The yolk sauce usually has some yellow food coloring in it to make it look more eggy. Using canola (rapeseed) oil helps with getting a nice color too. It should be dead simple to do at ...


2

Yes, you can, but it will reduce the tenderness of the custard. It will be slightly stiffer and slightly less... erm... creamy or pudding like. Egg whites are essentially water and protein (albumen) and set up to a more resilient and slightly rubbery texture than do egg yolks which contain significant amounts of fat and natural lecithin, which is an ...


1

There is no reason to try to remove the chalazae by hand in practice, or to worry about whether it goes with the whites (it will not interfere with foaming) or the yolks. The only application where they might be perceptible is a custard or curd. Simmered custards should be strained after cooking to catch any curdled bits; baked custards should be strained ...


1

I went ahead and tried it. I used hard-boiled yolks, as a soft and slimy one would be not really different from making the mayo in a waterbath. It turned out to be incredibly fickle. The first try, only yolk and oil, with immersion blender, split immediately and never recovered. The second try was supposed to incorporate the bad emulsion. I first made a ...



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