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14

While using a hot oven and keeping the tin hot while filling are both critical elements, equal concern needs to be taken with making sure that your batter is at room temperature. If the eggs and milk aren't room temp to even slightly warm, then it will take a significant amount of heat to simply warm the batter in the pan before significant steam can build ...


8

Yorkshire puddings rise because of the eggs in them. This means that the mixture for you Yorkshire puddings needs heat to rise So if your oven is not hot enough, they won't rise as much as you want. So here are some tips: -make sure your oven is hot before putting your puddings in -Don't open the oven while cooking your puddings -I always pre heat the ...


8

The key to making Yorkshire puddings rise is immediate heat. To achieve this you need to use a preheated oven at around 220 C (425f) and the oil in the Yorkshire pudding tin needs to be at almost smoke point, Around 180c. Don't hang about getting the baking tin into the oven, as soon as each well is filled, quickly place in the oven and bake for 20 to 25 ...


3

The key to getting them to rise I think is having very hot oil and a very hot oven. I tend to heat the oil in the oven first, but whilst I am pouring the mix in I put the tray on the heat on the hob to ensure the oil stays hot, otherwise it can tend to go cool in the first ones whilst I'm filling the other ones.


2

I'm guessing it's the oven. Here are some ideas: If the dish did not fully cook, it will stick. Bake until it dries and starts browning. The heat distribution in your oven may be uneven. I have an old oven and my dishes would burn, stick, and undercook until I started using a few tricks (self citation, beware). The main idea is to put a shield (an ...


2

I grew up in Yorkshire, that doesn't make me an immediate expert but my Mother used lard or beef dripping to coat the container for either Yorkshire Puddings or Toad in the Hole. You should preheat the lard in the oven, it should be 'very' hot. I suspect the issue with using the oil from the sausages is that you will get some water as well as the oil. This ...


1

I thought I would try adding baking powder to see if my usually really good Yorkshire puddings would rise any more but no batter went like light cake mixture was a waste of time will stick with my old recipe. If having trouble add another egg I always use 2 and not the recommended one and they are brilliant. Don't know why I messed around


1

The type of sausage makes a huge difference, from one sausage to another with the same pan you can have a batter that sticks or not. Experimenting with different sausages will show you the difference, especially if you try varying quality sausages. More extravagant sausages can cause trouble. But for a foolproof answer regardless of sausage type switch ...


1

Perhaps the container is too large, making for too thin an oil layer?


1

Ok, I'm and ex chef and I cheat. I use batter that has been electrically whisked with one egg and to a consistency of single cream and, here's the cheat, half a teaspoon of baking powder! I leave the batter covered in the kitchen to get lose its fridge-milk chill and develop the gluten for about an hour before use. Also its critical to use generous amounts ...


1

There are 3 keys to successful yorkshire puddings - 1/ High temperature oven. Yorkshire puddings rise due to quick cooking of the flour and steam being formed in the batter mixture, hence the requirement of a very hot oven and hot oil as you pour the batter into the yorkshire pudding tin. Once the yorkshire pudding has risen and is nearly done you can move ...


1

With all due respect, I wonder how much experimentation folks here have done with getting the oil/oven very hot and the ingredients not too cold. The problem I've had historically is the stuff sticking to the pan when cooked (I always make big ones, can't be doing with those small ones made in fairy cake tins!). So in recent times I've switched from a metal ...


1

I mix 4-5 heaped table spoons of plain flour with 2 large eggs. I mix these together in the hope I get a thick mixture that's quite stiff, if it's still a bit runny I'll add some more flour. Then I add whole milk to get a batter. The aim here is to keep adding milk so that I can use a hand whisk to get air into the batter, without the air bubbles quickly ...


1

I use a heavy oven safe ceramic pan which I preheat at 220 C / 425 F. I also allow the pudding batter to come to room temperature. This preheating of the ceramic works every time. Preheat a pyrex or corningware shallow pan. Once it is preheated pour in the oil or drippings, they will start smoking, the immediately pour in the batter and put it in the ...



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