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The trick is to make a Yorkshire pudding as normal in a square tin, then flatten risen pudding by gently rolling with a rolling pin, before filling.


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You want your yorkshire pud to rise and crisp, if it doesn't rise it will be dense and tough. If it doesn't crip it tends to shrink and again get dense. I personally don't think using yorkshire pudding as a wrap material is a good idea, I would use leftovers that way but I wouldn't cook it specifically for that reason. Basically, for it to be pliable it ...


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My first recipe for Yorkshire pudding did not rise very well, It was tasty, but a bit flat and somewhat custardy. After googling many recipes and seeing what they had in common, I realized my original recipe had fewer eggs than most recipes, about 3/4 the amount (by volume) of either milk or flour. When I increased the amount of eggs to equal the volume ...


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I use a mix from a cash and carry for yorkshire puddings for my pub sunday lunch service (it's as cheap as buying the ingredients separately), to which you just add water. It has bicarbonate of soda in it as a raising agent. The puddings are OK, but not brilliant. Last week I used my emergency pack of Aunt Bessies mix, and the puds were amazing. These ...



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