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8

The key to this is really high heat and pan-fry in a single layer, very quickly. The goal is to get that nice brown caramelized surface and barely cook the interior and then get it out of the pan before it starts to seep water. Also, wait to season with salt until it comes out of the pan so it doesn't draw out the water prematurely.


8

In general, they are interchangeable unless the green color matters in your presentation. Texturally the differences are insignificant. I've used patty pan squash, yellow summer squash (yellow zucchini), and regular zucchini interchangeably. There may be slight differences in sweetness or texture, but not enough to make your dish fail.


5

Mild bitterness in zucchini, like that found in cucumber, may be result from environmental factors such as high temperature, low moisture, low soil nutrients, etc. The bitterness is caused by compounds called cucurbitacins. There is also a rare condition which can cause extreme bitterness in zucchini. A compound called Cucurbitacin E is found in ...


4

When they're still young, I grill them -- trim ends cut into planks about 1/4" to 3/8" thick (~1cm) toss in olive oil sprinkle with salt grill over direct heat flip when you develop good char marks. pull from the grill once the other side is slightly charred. As they get older, the seed cavity starts developing -- you can cut the sides off, leaving the ...


3

To prepare the vegetable before cooking it, it's advisable to "leach" out some of the bitterness. Even if the eggplant is not particularly bitter, if you are using it in a dish in which you want minimal additional moisture, you'll want to prepare it this way. Slice your eggplant into discs (of desired thickness), and sprinkle salt over all the slices. ...


3

You can do nice things with shredded zucchini. Cut in half lengthwise and remove the seeds with a spoon, then shred on a grater or using a vegetable shredder. From there, you can saute with some shredded onion and a little olive oil (adding a tiny bit of curry powder can really jazz this up). Or you can make a sort of fritter/pancake. I can't tell you the ...


3

And for any people that likes the taste of the south. Try cutting them in 1/4" slices. Soak them in milk for half an hour, then in another bowl have yellow corn meal. Dip the zucchini in cornmeal mixture and place in a cast iron skillet with just enough olive oil to coat the pan. Make sure pan is hot, test it by putting a drop of water in pan, if you hear ...


3

Comparing this recipe to other zucchini bread recipes, and other muffins/quick breads, it seems to specify: Lower temperatures More overall moisture Shorter baking times than might be expected. I suggest you find and try a different recipe to try. It is very disturbing how casual it is with pan sizing and baking times--and it gave you no test to know ...


2

Following the recipe exactly doesn't guarantee the same result. There are many ingredients that may vary from different type. From that recipe, these ingredients come to mind as ones that can add water and make it mushy: Butter has different ratio of fat and water The eggs and the lemons have different ammounts of liquid in function of their size ...


2

Depending on their size you can roast and stuff them. We've made a variety of fillings using cooked mushrooms, breadcrumbs, soft cheeses, and herbs (no fixed recipe here, we just try what seems like a good idea). We usually slice them in half (lengthwise), and carve out the middle. Roast the zuccini on a baking sheet in the over at 400 until it starts to ...


2

It is generally recommended to "blanch" vegetables before freezing them. Blanching is heating the vegetables (by boiling or steaming) for a specific number of minutes. You typically follow blanching immediately with an ice-water bath, to stop the cooking process. From The National Center for Home Food Preservation: Blanching slows or stops the action ...


2

The basic idea is you want to reduce the ice crystals formed while freezing the food. Here is what I would suggest. Put a metal pan in your freezer for 30 minutes to cool Prep your zucchini, trying to get the most surface area possible Spread out, trying to not overlap on your pan and place back in the freezer for about an hour Place in your freezer bag ...


1

The way I've seen it at a show on TV: Put zucchini/eggplant slices on a cooling rack Salt one side, wait a while for the moisture to come out, then turn and salt the other side Squeeze carefully and wash off excess salt This way you should get much better results after roasting/frying.


1

I think your problem will disappear with proper technique. Zucchini and eggplant are indeed full of water. You have to both salt them well, to draw out the water, and cook them long enough for the liquid to evaporate. It sounds like you are both under-salting and under-cooking. Try roasting for longer and/or at a higher temperature. My personal ...


1

I fry them in olive oil. They respond really well to high heat, browning up nicely. Usually just eat them with garlic and black pepper, but you can use this as a basis for a pasta topping: fry zuchini with onions in olive oil(brown well), add garlic, add tomatoes, mushrooms, reduce and stew briefly, add herbs (marjoram, basil, ...), and finish with artichoke ...



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