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visits member for 2 years, 7 months
seen Dec 4 at 18:47

Nov
28
comment Reasonable level of inaccuracy in thermometer?
It sounds as if customer service or a not-so-competent technical support just quotes the tolerance of the thermistor in the probe (most thermistors have a ±5% tolerance) without really understanding what they are talking about. Even if the thermistor has a ±5% tolerance in its resistance compared to the specifications in the data sheet, it does not mean that a product using it cannot be accurate. The deviation is (for all practical purposes) not variable, so a single calibration of the actual thermometer is enough to rectify the tolerance of the temperature probe.
Nov
28
comment Reasonable level of inaccuracy in thermometer?
Where do you live? It's not necessarily wrong that your water boild at 96°C.
Nov
27
comment Should I default to higher or lower power when the recommended power is not an option in a microwave?
If the purpose is just to warm up already prepared food (and not actually to cook the food), I would in most cases go for full power until the food is warm enough.
Nov
21
comment How can I stabilize a berry coulis?
What is your expectation of a coulis? Where I live, coulis is just a fancy word for mash or purée. Using a fork and sieve like you have done, I would rather expect to get a blackberry juice.
Nov
20
comment How much fat should be added to venison when making sausage?
What kind of sausage are you intending to make? Common sausages have a fat content in the range of 0 to 50%, making it hard to give you a general advise. Depending on the amount of fat in your pork belly, even that alone may make a rather lean sausage.
Nov
13
comment What is the difference between a New York Strip and a Bone-In New York Cut Sirloin?
Since "Bone-In New York Cut Sirloin" is obviously the name of a dish on the menu of the Smith & Wollensky Steakhouse and not a standard name for a cut of beef, I don't know who should be able to answer you if not the steakhouse itself?
Oct
28
comment Are there blue foods out there?
None of the foods you list (except perhaps for the flowers) are blue, but purple or violet.
Oct
22
comment Ate steak with the layer of fat kind of undercooked, is it dangerous?
I don't know where you live and if we are talking about a beef steak here or some other animal, but in most countries, even raw beef (without any heat treatment) is considered safe to eat.
Oct
21
answered Halloumi ended up too soft
Sep
29
comment Can German Potato Balls be frozen?
I've actually never tried, but always heard (and believed) that you shouldn't freeze raw potatoes, since the freezing process would convert some of the potato starch into sugar?
Sep
23
comment What food dissolves in acid but not in water?
Benubird: The point is, that if that "something", in which you want to dissolve "some other thing", which is not soluble in water has impact on the taste, it will be important to find matching "something" and "some other thing". Using a weak acid would be acceptable if you try to make e.g. a fruit drink, but probably not if the result should be savory, e.g. a broth, meat or vegetable soup. If the result can be warm, a completely different (but perhaps too simple) approach would be to gel a concentrate with gelatine, form some interesting shapes, and then dissolve them in warm water.
Sep
22
comment What food dissolves in acid but not in water?
Benubird: I think it would be easier to help you if you described more precisely what your intentions are. Is it necessary to use an acid, since the acid most probably will have impact on the taste or even have to be so strong, that the result is not really palatable? Or are you just looking for a way to release a "trapped" scent, so that it is irrelevant if the result is actually tasty?
Sep
22
comment What food dissolves in acid but not in water?
Is it important that the result is edible, as in not just non-poisonous, but also that the second liquid doesn't have too much impact on the taste?
Sep
22
comment What food dissolves in acid but not in water?
@rumtscho: Even if Kate's wording is incorrect from a scientific point of view, her practical reasoning is correct. For example, if you add aluminum to an aqueous solution of hydrochlorid acid, the acid will react (not dissolve) with the aluminum and create aluminum chloride, which will dissolve in water. It may appear as if the acid dissolves the aluminum, but this is technically not quite correct. If you add aluminum to pure water, there will be no obvious reaction.
Jul
21
answered Is there such a thing as too much vanilla?
May
10
awarded  Yearling
Apr
16
comment What size are small, medium and large tomatoes?
IMHO a medium sized tomato is somewhere between a large lime and a small apple.
Jan
7
answered Lemon juice and kale/green leaf lettuce salad produces a very horseradish-y taste and smell
Jan
7
comment why does coconut ice turn brown after a couple of days
What is "sorbex"? Google finds it used as a trade name both for at least sorbitol, potassium sorbate, activated carbon and wound bandages.
Nov
16
comment Why are non-orange coloured carrots so uncommon?
I've also read that the orange carrot is a Dutch cultivation, even explained with orange being the national colour of the Netherlands. However, even the "Vienna Dioscurides" dating from appr. 515 AD has a picture of an orange carrot, making it obvious that orange carrots were at least bred and probably quite common much earlier: commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/…