336 reputation
25
bio website spamsense.blogspot.com
location Indianapolis, IN
age 42
visits member for 4 years, 4 months
seen 2 days ago

Professional: 16+ years C#/HTML/ASP.NET/SQL

Personal: 1 wife, 3 kids

Food-related: Family grill-master, pizza guy, chili-head and all-around "foodie". I've been experimenting with foods since I was about 10, and have worked in a wide range of restaurants as well as at other levels of food production. I like to sample new things, and have rarely met a cuisine that I didn't like.


Jul
17
comment Why did my attempt at pan-searing beef filets fail miserably?
It's also important to note that the heat level of a stovetop is extremely imprecise. Even among "identical" stoves, the heat level may vary by 50-100 degrees at a particular setting.
Mar
24
comment Why is 180 degrees C so common in recipes?
As @SAJ14SAJ says, it's a bookworthy topic. The basic gist is that you want the crust to be crisp on the bottom and the cheese lightly browned on top, but the center of the crust to be chewy. This is achieved by very high heat and very short cooking time - sometimes as little as 1-2 minutes, for brick-oven pizzas. Note that some recipes - such as pan or deep-dish pizza - alter this significantly because the pizza is thicker - you have to lower the heat and increase the time so it doesn't burn the exterior before the interior is ready.
Oct
11
comment How to barbecue marinated chicken drumsticks
What kind of marinade?
Aug
2
comment Is boiling water poured over frozen berries enough vs. bacteria?
I'd also suggest that, in general, NO, pouring boiling water over them wouldn't kill the bacteria (if present) for the following reasons: 1) would be surface-only, 2) would rapidly chill below the kill zone due to the temperature of the berries, and 3) would not be in contact long enough at a high enough temperature. Look at pasteurization (which doesn't actually sterilize, it only kills off enough pathogens to make the food "safe") - it requires a temperature of 275 degrees F (135C) for at least one second. That's well above the boiling point. At 160F (71C) you need at least 15-20 sec.
Aug
1
comment How to make smooth ice cream flavored with fresh fruit?
As an aside, for most fruits you really won't want to add more than a half-cup to a cup (?) to a half-gallon freezer if you're looking for ice cream as a result. Add too much, and you're in sorbet territory. And you still want the ice cream character to come through without being overwhelmed by the fruit.
Aug
1
awarded  Editor
Aug
1
revised How to make smooth ice cream flavored with fresh fruit?
added 59 characters in body
Aug
1
answered How to make smooth ice cream flavored with fresh fruit?
Aug
1
comment Freeze Soup very quickly Without Destroying the Content In Fridge?
I would not use glass bottles, because the rapid temperature change could cause them to fracture and add some extra "crunch" to your soup.
Jul
10
awarded  Yearling
Nov
22
comment Pouring cold water on pasta after cooking it
In the case of the vegetables, it's called "shocking". My understanding of the process is that other minerals and gases in the cells escape, leaving the chlorophyll more visible. Shocking the vegetables causes the chlorophyll to stabilize before it has a chance to break down.
Nov
12
comment Better Scrambled Eggs
I don't mix mine in during cooking, but I often make a scrambled egg sandwich with a bagel spread with cream cheese.
Nov
12
comment Better Scrambled Eggs
This is mostly what I do; sometimes I also dash in some Cholula or similar hot sauce while beating the egg.
Nov
9
comment Which torch to buy for finishing sous vide meat? Butane or propane?
What you describe regarding propane flavor is letting the torch run too "rich" - too much fuel compared to the oxygen, so it can't all burn off.
Sep
2
comment What are the main styles of pizza that are popular in America?
@Tobias - ever tried a stromboli? A calzone and stromboli are basically the same except that the sauce is baked into a stromboli while served on the side or poured on top with a calzone.
Sep
2
comment What are the main styles of pizza that are popular in America?
"The midwest. They cut the pizza in squares and it's not famous for being good. They also use a lot of sausage." - being from the midwest, it sounds like you're describing Pizza King, which really falls under the "Chains" section. Their "pizza" is cardboard-like crust smeared with a ketchupy sauce and greasy meats, and known more for being cheap than good. I can name at least 3 local pizza restaurants that are absolutely fabulous. In one case they do cut their pizza in squares, but it's awesome none the less.
Sep
2
comment How can huge bubbles in pizza crust be prevented?
Also, from your description I'd guess that ours were over-proofed. I wasn't the dough guy. :)
Sep
2
comment How can huge bubbles in pizza crust be prevented?
I worked at a local pizza restaurant for a couple of years, and that's exactly what we did - open the door every couple of minutes, spin the pie and pierce any bubbles with a fork.
Aug
22
answered Do all blenders have the problem of food sticking to the side away from the spinning blades?
Aug
20
comment How can I make a Taco Shell?
@mfg - a chalupa is more of a flatbread, so the technique will most likely be different.