274 reputation
15
bio website hackcraft.net
location Dublin, Ireland
age 39
visits member for 2 years, 10 months
seen Aug 13 at 10:42

When not programming I spend much of my free time avoiding the task of writing bios.

Currently having some fun with lock-free mutable collections at http://hackcraft.github.com/Ariadne/


Aug
13
answered Is “sealing in the flavor” an actual thing?
Aug
13
comment Is “sealing in the flavor” an actual thing?
Knowing how to do something that makes food taste better makes you a good cook. Knowing how that thing works makes you a good scientist. In this case your mother was being a better cook that scientist. It didn't seal the meat, but it did make it taste better.
Jul
24
revised Is a (British) wedding cake just a tiered fruit cake
Better link, and cover that Bride's Pie used to be a meat pie and became savoury later.
Jul
22
awarded  Commentator
Jul
22
comment Is a (British) wedding cake just a tiered fruit cake
You're correct, though there was an assumption that children would happen shortly after a marriage and generally not before one, that doesn't apply as much these days.
Jul
22
comment Is a (British) wedding cake just a tiered fruit cake
(Incidentally, sponge was very popular for a while simply because having a very pale coloured sponge required spending a lot of money on the flour, and people wanted to show off).
Jul
22
comment Is a (British) wedding cake just a tiered fruit cake
Well, that's the advantage of different layers. If in doubt do fruit for the smallest (most traditional, but perhaps the one with the most people not liking it) chocolate biscuit for the base (solid, easy to do, and very popular these days) and maybe a Victoria sponge (everyone at least tolerates it and everyone has a recipe, though be careful about putting something on top) or something that's a favourite of the couple, in between.
Jul
22
revised Is a (British) wedding cake just a tiered fruit cake
deleted 2 characters in body
Jul
22
answered Is a (British) wedding cake just a tiered fruit cake
Jun
21
comment Repeatedly softening ice cream in the microwave
@Ecnerwal are you in the US perhaps?
Jun
4
awarded  Yearling
Jun
4
answered Repeatedly softening ice cream in the microwave
Jun
12
comment What does one use a saw for?
It was illustrated by a restauranteur and gourmet, though, which would influence the composition's accuracy.
Jun
12
comment What does one use a saw for?
Does the handsaw look precisely like the sort of cross-cut handsaws that are in that picture? Butcher handsaws of the sort suggested in the answers here tend, as they say, to look more like hacksaws. Butchers generally called then handsaws, but if you'd known that already you wouldn't have been asking that question. It's a long time since I last read Madeline so I can't remember what any saws in it looked like.
Jun
12
comment What does one use a saw for?
The illustrator most certainly did know what a kitchen saw was; Bemelmans, who both wrote and illustrated the Madeline books (though the later books in the series are by his grandson) was pretty well-known as a gourmet, and was a restaurateur at least once in his life.
May
26
awarded  Supporter
May
26
revised How can I reassure myself a given food is not a botulism risk?
added 241 characters in body
May
26
answered How can I reassure myself a given food is not a botulism risk?
Nov
16
comment How long can eggs be unrefrigerated before becoming unsafe to eat?
Also, US hens aren't normally vaccinated, UK hens always would be.
Nov
16
comment How long can eggs be unrefrigerated before becoming unsafe to eat?
The difference between the UK and the US is that UK eggs aren't washed in disinfectant (illegal in the UK) and US eggs are (illegal not to in the US). Since this damages the shells, UK eggs will keep much longer than US eggs.