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age 38
visits member for 1 year, 8 months
seen Jan 13 '13 at 18:58

I cook, bake, ski, cycle, code, collect old music. I live in the Colorado Rockies.


Dec
29
awarded  Yearling
Jan
12
comment macaroni salad, potato salad, tuna salad excess moisture
Consider posting recipes, ingredients, procedure. Without, it's just guesswork.
Jan
12
comment What does the “bold” setting on my Cuisinart coffee maker do?
I hereby issue the following royal decree: "Bold" shall henceforth be the default setting on all things Cuisinart. This court shall not countenance wasted flavour. Make it so.
Jan
11
revised Why would I prefer carbon steel (rust prone) kitchen knife?
Typo. A knife is honed on a knife "steel", not a knife "steal". Also, "tomatoes", not "tomatos".
Jan
11
suggested suggested edit on Why would I prefer carbon steel (rust prone) kitchen knife?
Jan
11
comment Techniques for making sourdough starter in cold/altitude
Re: catching wild yeasts. Nancy Silverton was one of the early pioneers of the artisan bread movement in the United States (along with Steve Sullivan of Acme and many others). She made the mistake of mentioned the "capturing of wild yeasts" concept in her book (I think her advice was from organic grapes) and has never been forgiven for it. People still dismiss her book (The Breads of the La Brea Bakery) because of that advice (and the crazy large proportions for starting a starter), but some of the breads in that book are second-to-none.
Jan
11
comment Techniques for making sourdough starter in cold/altitude
@Athanasius Have not tried a desem starter, but you've peaked my interest. Not sure where I'd find 50-65F, as is too cold for room temperature and not cold enough for the refrigerator (and outside is 10 F).
Jan
11
comment Techniques for making sourdough starter in cold/altitude
Why just second rise? I need warm temperatures for bulk fermentation and proofing when using leavening with wild yeast.
Jan
11
comment Techniques for making sourdough starter in cold/altitude
@FuzzyChef It's more likely that L. sanfranciscensi comes from the water and local flours. Not sure about Seattle sourdough being distinctive. I lived there for more than a decade and baked sourdough-leavened loaves often, but can't say there was anything distinctive about them. We'd joke that if you'd buy a sour sourdough in Seattle, the sour was from doped dough (added acidity).
Jan
11
comment Techniques for making sourdough starter in cold/altitude
@Athanasius From experience. You can create a viable one below that, but it just takes so long to establish a viable one than most give up thinking they've failed. Like FuzzyChef says above (and I said re:Day 15 in the posted schedule), once a stable culture is established, it's very tolerant of cold (i.e. you won't kill it), but to make bread with it and to grow it at a rate reasonable enough for regular baking, you need warm temperature.
Jan
11
comment Techniques for making sourdough starter in cold/altitude
@Sobachatina That information is not correct. Microbiology has come a long way in the past few decades. We now know a lot more about the process of culture creation, stabilization, maintenance, dormancy, safety and much else related to the culturing of food microorganisms. We also know much that was written in the past is completely wrong if not downright silly, such as the notion of using mesh to allow microorganisms to inoculate the starter. That's completely unnecessary.
Jan
10
revised Techniques for making sourdough starter in cold/altitude
added 58 characters in body
Jan
10
comment Techniques for making sourdough starter in cold/altitude
This is incorrect advice. You will not be able to make a viable starter at 50 F, at least not in any reasonable amount of time (and reasonable for a sourdough starter is 2 weeks). At 50 F, it'll take much longer than that, if it works at all, which I doubt. It should be at least 74 F or warmer, but not too warm, and certainly not the 105 to 122 F used for yogurt making.
Jan
10
comment Techniques for making sourdough starter in cold/altitude
The starter container must be sterilized at the beginning of the process and then covered throughout. You don't need to capture microorganisms from the air. All the ones you need are already in the flour.
Jan
10
revised Techniques for making sourdough starter in cold/altitude
added 2693 characters in body
Jan
10
answered Techniques for making sourdough starter in cold/altitude
Jan
10
revised Implied cooking temperatures on food packaging
Question lacked clarity.
Jan
10
suggested suggested edit on Implied cooking temperatures on food packaging
Jan
9
awarded  Commentator
Jan
9
comment American equivalent for British chocolate terms
@Joe What is a bar cookie? I know what a "bar cookie" is (a cookie in the shape of a bar), but not this "I have a recipe that calls for using the heat of a bar cookie to melt the chocolate".