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2d
revised Challah rolls open up when baking in the oven
Added clarification about proofing time
2d
answered Challah rolls open up when baking in the oven
Dec
19
comment I used evaporated milk instead of sweetened condensed milk in a fudge recipe. How do I fix this?
@Joe - the composition of dulce de leche can vary widely: in many places, it is quite common to make dulce de leche by cooking an (often sealed) contained of condensed milk, which would obviously not concentrate or condense it further, merely subject it to further Maillard reactions and thus alter the flavor and texture. Even prepared traditionally by cooking down fresh milk, dulce de leche may not be significantly more concentrated (depends on ingredient proportions). All that said, it might still make some delicious fudge, just with a very different taste.
Dec
19
awarded  Nice Question
Dec
19
comment Do pan “pores” exist, what are they, and what are their effects?
I agree the pictures are helpful in understanding what surface characteristics may be referenced. And I did just rewatch the video, which makes me more curious than ever. It implies that the pores (peppercorns) move around in random ways during the heating phase, but then at some point they stabilize, and that makes them less likely to "bite down" on the food and make it stick (whatever that means). There are just too many metaphors going on ("pores," peppercorns, "biting") for me to figure out what is actually happening. But anyhow--thanks for your input; I'm not the only one confused.
Dec
19
comment Do pan “pores” exist, what are they, and what are their effects?
(1) No, sorry, you're mistaken, at least at the macro level. (2) Yes, I watched the videos before I posted the question; in fact, they caused me to post the question. I'm looking for some actual scientific sources (not hearsay) that might, for example, show the actual behavior of these holes/grooves/pores at higher temperatures and perhaps demonstrate that their changes at high temperatures are actually meaningful in a culinary sense.
Dec
18
comment Do pan “pores” exist, what are they, and what are their effects?
Thanks for the research; I'm confused on a few points. (1) On a macroscopic level, holes generally don't get smaller heated: if you heat a hollow cylinder, the entire thing will enlarge slightly, including the hole in the middle. Are things different at these scales for some reason? (2) The link you gave (which, you will note, was already in my question) explains that the non-stick effect is due to the Leidenfrost effect, which has nothing to do with surface unevenness. And comments there imply that sticking may be caused by "pores" contracting/closing when cold food cools the surface.
Dec
18
comment Used old chicken broth in a stew, but washed it out. Will it be safe to eat?
I'm assuming you meant something else when you said "180 degrees c for over 20 mins". Most standard pressure cookers add about an extra atmosphere of pressure, allowing a cooking temp around 120 C. To achieve 180 C, you'd need a pressure of roughly 10 atmospheres, which is WAY beyond what any cooking equipment could produce. You're right that pressure cooking could kill off some things not killed in normal boiling, but it could still leave behind some persistent toxins in something that was quite spoiled.
Dec
18
comment Best thickness for shaped pizza dough for good sliding from the peel/tray into the oven
@Johnny - I disagree. The amount of "spring back" will depend on a number of factors: length of proof, hydration level, type of flour, etc. I often make pizza that ferments in the fridge for 1-3 days, then sits out at room temperature or above for minimum 3-4 hours before baking, so it's definitely not "underproofed," yet it always springs back somewhat. If the dough doesn't spring back at all (even 1/4"), I generally get worried, since that implies the gluten is so weak that my pizza could rip apart during unloading in the oven (as has happened a couple times with overfermented sourdough).
Dec
8
awarded  Curious
Dec
7
revised Do pan “pores” exist, what are they, and what are their effects?
Clarified edit and request for empirical evidence
Dec
7
comment Do pan “pores” exist, what are they, and what are their effects?
Thanks for the thoughts. Does your #2 imply that the stainless steel thing is a myth, then? If only "very small divets" will close, would this really have any effect on sticking? After all, most people seem to agree that visibly scratched stainless shouldn't have a huge effect on sticking, so do these microscopic changes actually have a practical impact? Also, do you have any sources for this information? I know enough about materials science that I could speculate on what's going on too, but I'm looking for a reliable discussion of this stuff.
Dec
7
asked Do pan “pores” exist, what are they, and what are their effects?
Dec
6
comment Are there any differences between preparing/cooking a turkey that was labeled “basted with real butter” vs a regular turkey?
Regarding the possibility of brining, see this question. The main question is whether the "pre-basted" also includes a salt solution injection. Most commercial pre-basted birds do. The ingredients list should give you some hints about what was added.
Dec
5
comment Why can I resuse green tea leaves several times, but not black?
This was asked as a "bonus" to another question here. Some of the answers there attempt to deal with this.
Dec
4
answered Does it matter that my pots are bigger than my ceremic cook top element?
Dec
1
comment Can I purify / kill germs in a water to make it drinkable by putting it in a freezer?
Freezing is NOT an effective treatment for anything other than perhaps some parasites. If your "city water" has been properly treated (e.g., with chlorine) to kill microbes before it comes to your house, then what you do afterward doesn't matter. It will already be "drinkable." If your water still contains things like bad bacteria, freezing will NOT make it safe. If you are putting water in your freezer just to fill it up, that's fine, but you will not improve the quality of the water by doing so. Again, freezing also requires a LOT of energy, so it's hard to justify it for little benefit.
Dec
1
comment Does dissolved sugar really help to extract fruit flavours?
If you mean "sugar flavors," i.e., sweetness, yes, I agree. When you said "sugar-related," I assumed you meant things other than sugar (e.g., "fruit flavors," like the flavors I was referring to that follow water). As for more complex sugar molecules that you may be referring to, they will probably exchange across the barrier regardless of whether the solution is water or a sugar solution. (As the water moves out of the fruit in a sugar solution, it will carry dissolved stuff including some sugar molecules; exchange will continue to occur until things come to a better equilibrium.)
Dec
1
comment Does dissolved sugar really help to extract fruit flavours?
Also, for the record, I'm not sure that "sugar-related flavors" really exist; flavors are not generally "dissolved" in sugar as they are in water. Increasing sugar output from the fruit won't actually increase flavor extraction to a significant degree; it will just bring out small amounts of sugar.
Dec
1
comment Does dissolved sugar really help to extract fruit flavours?
As I said in the answer, both sugar and alcohol have a tendency to draw water (and flavor) out of fruit. I've looked around a bit in food science books, and I don't see much explanation about interactions in solutions which contain BOTH sugar AND alcohol. While the general tendency of osmosis is to try to equalize things, there may be interactions here that still justify the sugar addition in some cases. (I rather like the idea of Piglet's method, which would pull different components from the fruit at different stages.)