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2d
answered Does kimchi always have live cultures?
2d
answered Putting a solid chocolate bar inside cake dough: what's the outcome?
Aug
18
awarded  Notable Question
Aug
7
awarded  Good Answer
Aug
6
comment Why wooden sticks for ice cream bars?
@Jefromi - if I find something better, I'll post it. The book mostly speaks to the general method of manufacturing small wooden items very cheaply, but I don't think it has a "smoking gun" quote about the current price of popsicle sticks. As I said in my comment above, Memj's answer is supported by available wholesale pricing of large quantities of things like popsicle sticks, chopsticks, and toothpicks, where wood seems to be a fraction of the cost of plastic. In any case, I'd guess this is something that's "common knowledge" in the industry, so it's hard to find a source discussing it.
Aug
6
awarded  Nice Answer
Aug
6
revised Why wooden sticks for ice cream bars?
Corrected date
Aug
6
revised Why wooden sticks for ice cream bars?
Added historical perspective and more sources
Aug
6
comment Why wooden sticks for ice cream bars?
@supercat - yes, of course you're right. And I assume that was one main motivation for producing cheap plastic sticks: the holes save on raw material required. But they also happen to solve a couple of the potential problems discussed in other answers.
Aug
5
comment Why wooden sticks for ice cream bars?
@Raphael - while you're right, the question is whether the difference is significant enough to cause discomfort. I updated my answer below with detailed thermal properties of the two materials (which aren't nearly as different as this answer claims), as well as a link to a site that reviewed dozens of different types of plastic popsicle molds, most of which had plastic sticks. If you can find a link discussing actual plastic popsicle sticks (which clearly exist) which claims they are significantly uncomfortable to hold, I'd be interested.
Aug
5
revised Why wooden sticks for ice cream bars?
Added more links and details
Aug
5
comment Why wooden sticks for ice cream bars?
@Raphael - Point taken. I wasn't literally suggesting making ice cream bars with plastic spoons, though. My point was: with a piece of plastic of roughly that size and thickness, did you find your hand getting frozen to the plastic (or at least significantly uncomfortable holding the spoon), as this answer suggests?
Aug
5
comment Storing Unopened Mozzarella
Agree with Catija. Every package of vacuum-packed mozzarella I've ever bought has a "best by" or "use by" date. The shelf-life accroding to that date usually depends on the type of mozzarella ("low moisture" or not, etc.), but it's generally anywhere from a month to a few months.
Aug
5
answered Why wooden sticks for ice cream bars?
Aug
5
comment Why wooden sticks for ice cream bars?
Yes, I've held plenty of plastic things that have come out of my freezer. Unless they are very thick and/or filled with something, it's not uncomfortable to hold them at all. Put a disposable plastic spoon in your freezer and take it out after a few hours. It's not uncomfortable to hold. That's about the equivalent of what we're talking about here.
Jul
31
reviewed Reject What can I substitute for eggs in a pancake recipe?
Jul
31
answered How can I cut fudge smooth and uniform?
Jul
30
comment How do I bake cakes in a gas oven without a temperature knob?
@Jefromi - Yes, I thought about whether to add "x seconds = hot oven", etc. but the reality is this varies a bit from person to person. I think the only way to learn it is either to have someone show you ("This is a moderate oven; put your hand in and you try") or by trial and error ("Last time my cakes browned too fast, so I need to be able to count longer..."). Either way, I think it just takes experience.
Jul
30
answered How do I bake cakes in a gas oven without a temperature knob?
Jul
28
comment Does temperature of water affect carbonation process
@Joe - Solubility of CO in many organic solvents (benzene, acetone, etc.) changes direction at some point. But CO solubility in water increases with decreasing temperature, like most gases. (Your link explains why in more detail.)