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seen Jul 3 at 3:44

Jul
3
comment Why does a pizza stone make my pizza dough bread-like?
Possible modifications: lower hydration (more flour, less water), maybe less yeast, put stone on lowest oven rack, thoroughly deflate dough before stretching (and/or roll out), stretch as thin as possible (my thin-crust is translucent before baking), consider baking blind at start (as user150153 suggests). Frankly, if I were you, I'd just invest in a second pan; the main benefit of a stone is creating a better rise. It's not really the ideal tool for thin, crispy pizza, which is often grilled or made on a pan (and sometimes moved once it has partially cooked onto a rack or even oven floor).
Jul
3
answered Cooking with a pizza stone
Jul
3
answered transfer pizza onto stone without sticking
Jul
3
comment Why does a pizza stone make my pizza dough bread-like?
A few things: (1) Are you preheating the stone? Most stones are meant to be preheated in the oven before cooking; if you don't do this, you may be less likely to get a crispy/firm bottom on crust. (2) If you are preheating, the main point of a stone is to get a better rise out of your crust. If it's too thick and bready for your taste, you'll either need to stretch the dough thinner or alter the recipe. (3) If the main issue is lack of crispness, you can also pull the stone out of the oven with the pizza on and leave it for a few minutes, which can firm the crust without burning the toppings.
Jun
29
reviewed Reject suggested edit on A proper way to cook Mi Goreng noodles?
Jun
29
comment How to evenly fry cubes?
@Relaxed - Just to be clear (having looked again at your answer): I'm not suggesting that you should get the first side "completely done" before flipping, only that it start getting color and crisp. And for (permanently) firm foods (e.g., diced ham), it's probably not necessary.
Jun
29
comment How to evenly fry cubes?
@Relaxed, it mostly has to do with balancing time to brown exterior vs. time for inside to cook and soften. If you don't get the exterior crisp fast enough, foods like diced potatoes and tofu will sometimes start to break apart in the pan as they soften. Not crowding the pan will ensure faster browning, and waiting to try to get two solid crisp sides will often firm up the cubes enough to avoid later problems. Also, allowing time to crisp will ensure a better release from a pan; starchy potatoes could otherwise stick and end up creating burned stuck bits which could make the situation worse.
Jun
28
answered How to evenly fry cubes?
Jun
21
comment I want to duplicate my bread mistake!
I'd normally guess temp or humidity, but since you say no, I'd have to agree with the yeast hypothesis. A lot of extra yeast will alter flavor (usually undesirably), but a little more often can add lightness which itself can produce a more desirable flavor/texture combo. I also think a significant clue is that you didn't notice anything different during the initial mix, but only the stickiness after the first rise. Any other big measuring errors would likely have been noticeable during mixing (except maybe too little salt, but flavor difference should be more noticeable).
Jun
21
comment How to make beans more neutral tasting?
While this answer has been modded down, it's largely correct (despite the debate about TFD's taste buds and canned beans). In commercial situations where it is desirable to remove flavor (and particular "beany" flavor) -- like soymilk production or red bean paste for sweets -- the most common processing steps are long boiling or steaming at high temperatures and/or multiple soaks followed by discarding the soaking liquid. While all canned beans don't "taste the same," their flavors are often significantly muted compared to slow-simmered beans which have retained all soaking liquids.
Jun
21
revised Why won't my beans soften?
Added info from McGee about permanently hard beans
Jun
21
comment Why won't my beans soften?
@Joe - I'd be interested in hearing the results of your experiment. FYI - this link has a great summary (about halfway down the page) of recent food science folks who have done their own experiments on the issue. The consensus seems to be that salting leads to softer beans and specifically softer skins (a couple sources actually recommend salt to solve the tough beans problem). Salting the soaking water may speed cooking time; there is some disagreement over whether salting the cooking water could lengthen cooking time.
Jun
20
revised How does adding baking soda to soaking beans/lentils reduce the gas they make you have?
Added new information from other sources, fixed conclusion
Jun
20
awarded  Necromancer
Jun
20
comment Why won't my beans soften?
This is very useful advice; thanks for adding it. I would note that the last statement is no longer thought to be true: Salt actually can actually aid in softening beans by replacing sodium ions, which is one reason baking soda works.
Jun
20
answered How does adding baking soda to soaking beans/lentils reduce the gas they make you have?
Jun
20
awarded  Vox Populi
Jun
20
awarded  Suffrage
Jun
20
revised Why won't my beans soften?
Added info on cooking time.
Jun
20
answered Why won't my beans soften?