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seen Sep 25 at 2:33

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awarded  Revival
Sep
25
answered How do I properly use a ceramic honing steel?
Sep
25
comment Leavening and cooking with a loaf of bread / pizza and a 392° F / 200° C oven
What is your recipe? The problem could be a number of things; sourdough is tricky if you're not familiar with it. My guess based on the problem is something among the following (or a combination): (1) starter isn't really as active or well-established yet as you think, (2) too high proportion of starter in recipe, so yeast exhausts food too early (if final dough/bread is overly sour, this is likely), and/or (3) too long for first proof (for sourdough, even waiting for full doubling can be too long, depending on recipe).
Aug
21
awarded  Good Answer
Aug
17
revised Are there similar scales like the Scoville scale?
Added explanation of the limitations of these scales
Aug
17
answered Are there similar scales like the Scoville scale?
Aug
17
answered Bagged or Loose Leaf Tea
Aug
17
comment Water vs. milk/cream (or nothing) in traditional (French) omelets
@Jolenealaska, thanks for the rec, but I've been making reasonably good French omelets for a while. Frankly, one of the things that made me question a lot of what ATK says is when I encountered this omelet video a few years back. Just my opinion, but the whole paper towel thing is rather ridiculous, as is the technique of the person screwing up the pan flip. It took me maybe a dozen times to master flipping the pan to do a fold without utensils, and if you tend to screw it up, most chefs just use a fork/spatula/spoon to fold it up anyway.
Aug
17
comment Water vs. milk/cream (or nothing) in traditional (French) omelets
Thanks for the answer. It's really interesting that they found the exact opposite of the myth I've usually heard, i.e., that it's milk which leads to tougher omelets. I also find the frozen butter thing a little hilarious and even more finicky that ATK's usually wackiness.
Aug
17
awarded  Scholar
Aug
17
accepted Water vs. milk/cream (or nothing) in traditional (French) omelets
Aug
16
reviewed Reject suggested edit on Are fungal toxins a significant problem in coffee, and if so, can they be avoided?
Aug
16
comment Water vs. milk/cream (or nothing) in traditional (French) omelets
These are very helpful comments, and I've thought along that line myself. But if this is true, then the question becomes: why is it then okay to add milk/cream to scrambled eggs if they aren't being used in an omelet? Wouldn't the toughness still be there? Either we're just more accepting of tougher scrambled eggs than we are of tough omelets, or there's something specific about the omelet technique that creates the problem. (And also, wouldn't we get casein from butter in the pan anyway? Yet I've never seen a recipe suggesting an omelet should limit its butter...)
Aug
15
comment How to choose a pan for making caramel?
Ah, I understand now. I absolutely agree that trying to cook sugar in a very thin pan is probably a bad idea. I'm not advocating copper specifically, by the way; I was just using it as an example for a highly conductive metal. Your idea of a stainless pan with a thick aluminum disk or core is a good one; the price and design are not as important as the thickness of the aluminum.
Aug
15
comment How to choose a pan for making caramel?
"A thick, slow-warming pan's inner surface will be much more even heated than the outer surface, because it evens out while the heat diffuses through the pan" - That's absolutely true, and it's why chefs use 2.5-3mm copper pans rather than the 1.5mm display pieces you often see at cooking shops. But to achieve the same heat diffusion and evenness as in 2.5mm copper, you'd need about 7mm of aluminum, but a couple inches of cast iron (which would make the pan weigh hundreds of pounds). Thickness can make pans more even, but it can't change the conductivity numbers for the material.
Aug
15
comment How to choose a pan for making caramel?
Great answer, though I don't agree about the distinction between "even heating" and "responsiveness." A pan that responds faster will even out its hot spots faster, so the two tend to go hand-in-hand. The least hot spots will be found in a copper or aluminum (or aluminum core) pan, which are my preferences for sugar work. I imagine your cast iron pans heat quite evenly on an induction stove, but with an uneven heat source like a gas burner, cast iron will be both unresponsive and display considerable hot spots.
Aug
15
asked Water vs. milk/cream (or nothing) in traditional (French) omelets
Jul
3
comment Why does a pizza stone make my pizza dough bread-like?
Possible modifications: lower hydration (more flour, less water), maybe less yeast, put stone on lowest oven rack, thoroughly deflate dough before stretching (and/or roll out), stretch as thin as possible (my thin-crust is translucent before baking), consider baking blind at start (as user150153 suggests). Frankly, if I were you, I'd just invest in a second pan; the main benefit of a stone is creating a better rise. It's not really the ideal tool for thin, crispy pizza, which is often grilled or made on a pan (and sometimes moved once it has partially cooked onto a rack or even oven floor).
Jul
3
answered Cooking with a pizza stone
Jul
3
answered transfer pizza onto stone without sticking