7,608 reputation
11441
bio website
location
age
visits member for 2 years, 6 months
seen 1 hour ago

Jun
30
comment Pan makes knocking noises
I don't know what the cause of the noises is. However, I would note that separation of the bimetal laminate in stainless/copper pans from the top producers (Mauviel, Bourgeat, Falk, etc.) is exceedingly rare. For lesser brands, I suppose it might happen. (Just to note the rarity: I've only ever heard of it from tinned copper fans. Not saying it can't happen, which it definitely could, but I've never actually seen a first-hand account on various cooking forums I've read on copper.) Anyhow, if separation was happening, you'd likely see significant warping, discoloration, or other pan damage.
Jun
28
comment Difference between sweating and sautéeing?
Also, I realized my first comment may have been unclear -- I was talking about food surface temperatures to get browning reactions, not pan temperatures. Just to be clear: I wasn't suggesting sauteing with the pan at 300F or something. Obviously the pan should be hotter, but 350-450F or "just below smoking" is what I've usually heard (which is fine for non-stick). If there are other sources that disagree, though, I'm interested in hearing about them.
Jun
28
comment Difference between sweating and sautéeing?
I've seen advice by a few different European chefs that oil should NOT be smoking for a saute--perhaps just below the smoke point, but generally not smoking. Harold McGee says 350-450F, which would accord with that observation. German Wikipedia says 160-240C, which is similar, and French Wikipedia says to use a "une température relativement élevée" (and shows a picture with a non-stick pan, I believe). Do you have a cite that suggests sauteing above the smoke point or >~450F? (I'm curious.)
Jun
28
comment Difference between sweating and sautéeing?
I agree with everything except for "wicked hot" and the "you can't use nonstick at these temperatures." Maillard reactions begin to happen at significant rates in the 250-300F range, while caramelization happens in the 300-400F range. There's no reason your food surface needs to go significantly over 400F to saute, unless you plan to burn it. That's perfectly within the reasonable operating range of nonstick cookware. Also, almost all oils will be smoking like crazy before you get to bad temperatures for nonstick coatings; burning oil isn't usually the goal for saute.
Jun
28
answered How to cleanly cover the dough while it rise?
Jun
27
answered Thin crust pizza on barbecue
Jun
24
reviewed Approve Substitute For Cream of Tartar
Jun
24
answered Do Liquor Based Extracts Require Sugar?
Jun
24
answered How can I ensure that scrambled eggs will be fully cooked?
Jun
24
comment When is it OK to cook a burger medium?
To respond to comments like, "I've always done it and nothing bad happened"--that does NOT imply it is a safe practice. Ground beef is known to be contaminated sometimes and to cause serious illness; I'm glad it didn't happen to you. As for "steak tartare," it is usually prepared very fresh where the outer portion of a hunk of raw meat is often trimmed (to remove surface bacteria), and the inner portion is chopped or ground just before serving. That's a very different process from putting untrimmed mixed meat and fat in a meat grinder and wrapping it in a supermarket package for days.
Jun
24
comment Is it normal for the colour of the cooked lentils to change overnight even when they were kept in fridge?
If I understand you correctly, only the surface layer of lentils changed color; the rest retained their color. It sounds like the surface of the lentils was influenced by changes in moisture in the air above them when you put them in the fridge. I've seen many foods change color on their surface a bit after refrigeration for this reason. (I don't know for certain this is the reason, which is why I'm posting as a comment rather than as an answer.)
Jun
17
answered What strength of brine will completely inhibit growth of lactobacillus (and friends)?
Jun
17
comment How can you consistently separate Kefir into curds and whey for cheesemaking?
Do you have experience making other hard cheeses, particularly with rennet? If you don't use rennet, it can take quite a bit of effort in pressing and drying over a period of weeks (or even months) to produce a stable dry cheese, and it may still be somewhat crumbly. Good advice on dried kefir cheeses here. In any case, as long as your kefir is acidic enough to cause the milk to firm up, it should allow separation of whey when drained and pressed.
Jun
13
comment How can you consistently separate Kefir into curds and whey for cheesemaking?
Just a general question, but don't you have to strain it through cheesecloth or something to make the cheese anyway? I've made plenty of soft cheeses, and in cases like kefir and yogurt, you generally hang the "cheese" and let it strain for a day or so. The remaining solids will be moist, so while it may help a bit to have better separation, you're going to strain it anyway. Is there a reason you need a stronger separation? Is the whey not dripping off? (If not, you probably need greater acidity, but healthy kefir should produce plenty.)
Jun
13
comment Remedy a sourdough which used milled red winter wheat
Your situation isn't entirely clear from the question. But assuming you've created a starter from scratch, I agree with rumtscho. Have a look at my answer to a similar question. There will be a period of rapid growth and lots of bubbles anywhere from day 1 to 3. After that, the starter will often become less active for a while. That's because the initial activity is usually due to bacteria growth--not yeast--and those kind of bacteria can't survive anymore as the starter becomes acidic. Type of wheat and bran should NOT be the problem here.
Jun
11
answered Problem making cakes and pancakes
Jun
11
comment Toasting bagel in my oven
Are you using a broiler in the oven, or are you preheating the whole oven just for toasting? Putting a bagel under a broiler for a quick toast will probably waste more energy than a toaster, but it's still just heating one element for a relatively short time. If you're heating a big oven several hundred degrees just to toast a bagel, obviously that's going to waste a lot more energy.
Jun
11
answered Can you mix Red Onion chutney into bread?
Jun
10
answered Should I refrigerate hot sauce?
Jun
5
comment How can I cheaply cook a bratwurst that is similar to a grilled brat with only access to an oven or stovetop?
@moscafj - or perhaps the bigger question: why the grate? Whittle a stick, put the brat on, and roast it. Easier to control than a grate over an open fire. :)