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Feb
5
answered What is the functional difference between imitation vanilla and true vanilla extract?
Feb
5
comment How do I lessen the effects of thickening caused by roux?
+1 - This is the first answer that really addresses the revised question, which is mostly interested in decreasing thickening power of roux. And frankly the easiest way of doing it is to simply use less next time. I'd also note that roux proportions aren't set in stone, so if the butter flavor was important, it's OK to make a roux with a bit more butter than flour (that is, just decrease the flour). It will still work, but the thickening power would be lessened significantly.
Feb
5
answered Do you achieve better results from marinating if you poke holes in the meat beforehand?
Feb
4
answered How does produce grading in the US work?
Feb
4
revised Can I use 3 jalapenos in place of 1 habanero?
deleted 2 characters in body
Feb
4
answered Can I use 3 jalapenos in place of 1 habanero?
Feb
2
awarded  Constituent
Jan
31
awarded  Caucus
Jan
31
revised What is the difference between expensive wine and regular wine?
Added one more link on French juries with explanation
Jan
31
comment What is the difference between expensive wine and regular wine?
@MarcLuxen - Scientific hangover research is in its infancy, so I'm not sure we have definitive evidence about cheaper wine. There are important confounding factors too, like the fact that people tend to drink more alcohol when it is cheap, and more alcohol is known to cause worse hangovers. Even the "wine world" folks agree that cheap wine isn't necessarily correlated with hangovers.
Jan
30
revised What is the difference between expensive wine and regular wine?
Added some links
Jan
30
revised What is the difference between expensive wine and regular wine?
Cleaned up prose a bit, added a link
Jan
30
comment What is the difference between expensive wine and regular wine?
@Jefromi: I didn't write the answer to "steal" the bounty, and I still think the other answer is excellent (and deserving of recognition). "Quality" is also a problematic term: I can buy a handmade copper pan, but it's unlikely to cook better than a machine-made copper pan of the same specs from a good manufacturer. Yet I might still value the "quality" of the first for aesthetic or cultural reasons, as I might value the quality of a crafted wine beyond its objective taste. I tried to address the latter issue (because it came up in the question), but other differences may still be important.
Jan
30
awarded  Notable Question
Jan
30
answered What is the difference between expensive wine and regular wine?
Jan
29
comment Science of fast (high heat) vs. slow (low heat) scrambled eggs and omelets
@AdamDavis - You overlook the possibility that the final product is actually demonstrably different in the two cases, yet those two products both share a few desirable features. (Cooking technique is known to affect the physical structure of coagulated eggs.) I have made eggs both ways, and I agree that both are delicious, but I think the results may be actually different in subtle ways.
Jan
24
comment How long can I cook beef or pork without becoming toxic?
As Joe said, if you keep above ~140F, it should not grow any toxins/bacteria while cooking longer. Also, I don't think the proposed duplicate is the same question at all. The "never-ending soup" was a method which cooled down the soup and reheated on a regular basis. It was hazardous because of many trips through the "Danger Zone." This question is talking about continuous cooking. (There probably is a duplicate, but this one isn't a good fit.)
Jan
24
revised Why do fridge temperature standards between US and other countries differ?
Added slight clarification
Jan
24
comment Why do fridge temperature standards between US and other countries differ?
@rackandboneman - Well, as Jefromi notes, stuff can still grow at 4C, so if you want guarantee "absolute" safety in cooked food which is to be stored a long time, follow the last link's advice and go down to 38F (3.3C) maximum. But yes, assuming the food was pasteurized during cooking and cooled properly, ~40F (~4C) should be more than sufficient for a week or more.
Jan
23
revised Why do fridge temperature standards between US and other countries differ?
added 239 characters in body