21,024 reputation
841102
bio website
location Sunnyvale, CA
age 28
visits member for 4 years
seen 2 hours ago

Site/community/mod philosophy: I fight for the users. (and also the site.)

Eating philosophy: yum, everything tastes so good. I'm originally from Texas, so I do love my Mexican food and barbecue, but I love just about everything else too.

Cooking philosophy: enjoy yourself! Don't measure unless you need precision, don't rush if you've got time, taste everything, and make enough for leftovers.


3h
comment Do professional cooks use measuring cups and spoons?
For what it's worth, I think it's worth putting emphasis on using measuring spoons for small measurements. There's this "scales are amazing" attitude, and while it's quite deserved for bigger things, it really is easier and more accurate to use a half teaspoon than to try to measure 2.3 grams of baking soda.
18h
comment Heating meat in a microwave
What kind of container are you heating it in? Or just on a plate?
19h
revised How can I keep pasta shapes intact?
deleted 83 characters in body
2d
comment Why does cooked food spoil faster during a storm?
(As for reports that match your experience: that's just confirmation bias. If someone's food spoils without a storm, no one will care. If someone's food spoils during a storm, they'll see it as evidence of the claim, and you might hear about it.)
2d
comment Why does cooked food spoil faster during a storm?
@kaay I'd say my paraphrasing was pretty accurate. The only piece of that which attempts to provide "evidence" that it actually happens is "spoken of across the whole world." First, this is clearly an exaggeration, because I've never heard of it. Second, however widely it's spoken of, that doesn't make it more than an old wives' tale. You say you've seen it, but from the point of view of the rest of us who never have, that just suggests you've done something weird in your kitchen, not that storms cause spoilage. You should be asking a "whether" question first.
2d
comment Why does cooked food spoil faster during a storm?
@kaay I don't speak Polish, but as far as I can tell from Google translate, that article says basically, people have traditionally believed this and some unnamed chefs buy into it, presents no evidence it's real, assumes it is, and makes up a few implausible exclamations. If I were you I'd be asking if it's real, not why it happens.
2d
comment Why does cooked food spoil faster during a storm?
Maybe ask on skeptics.stack exchange.com if this is real?
2d
comment Sausage grease in fridge
This particular situation may or may not be safe, but the idea that heating over 175F makes things safe is very dangerous. Yes, it will kill most bacteria, but it will not necessarily destroy the toxins they produce. See for example cooking.stackexchange.com/questions/32167/…
2d
revised Sausage grease in fridge
added 310 characters in body
2d
comment Is there no use for high temperatures in ovens?
@LightnessRacesinOrbit Please post a separate question if you actually want to know about how people make pizza, or go to Seasoned Advice Chat if you just want to be snarky. I'll clean up the comments here; they're tangential and way too chatty.
Aug
26
comment Is it safe to remove the rings on jars for long-term storage of home-canned goods?
On the other hand, you'll want the ring once you open the jar, so it's nice for it to just be there, especially if you're giving canned goods as gifts.
Aug
26
comment Edible lollipop sticks for a complicated birthday cake
@AirThomas Okay, then more specifically, I don't think it's an unsuitable question, I think the fact that there's more than one possible answer is fine (there are specific criteria and the list won't be that long), and I think it can be helpful to future readers. If you want to improve it (without changing the intent), go for it, but I certainly don't think that it needs to be closed if it's unchanged.
Aug
26
comment How to seal a jar with a jam so that it can be opened without breaking the lid?
I guess they at least have the little pop-up/down bit in the middle, so you can verify that you have an airtight seal? Without that, I'd be worried that you could even get a physically tight seal (the threads are wedged somehow) without it being safe.
Aug
26
comment How to seal a jar with a jam so that it can be opened without breaking the lid?
@Joe It looks a lot like a commercial jar, a one-piece screw-on lid.
Aug
26
comment How to seal a jar with a jam so that it can be opened without breaking the lid?
Something meant for canning, or reusing a jar from something else?
Aug
26
comment How to seal a jar with a jam so that it can be opened without breaking the lid?
Are you using canning jars with ring and lid? The way you describe it, it sounds like you might not be...
Aug
25
comment Edible lollipop sticks for a complicated birthday cake
@AirThomas The fact that there's more than one answer doesn't mean it's a bad question. And it will be helpful to future users because future users may want to do something similar; wanting to avoid inedible components is pretty common. The suggestions in the comments need to be in an answer, not comments, but that's not the OP's fault.
Aug
25
comment I have some leftover deep-fried chicken from my fastfood takeaway. Is it safe to store in the fridge and eat it tomorrow?
I'll just close it as a duplicate of our canonical shelf life question - I think it's pretty clear from the answer there that cooked foods are good for at least 3-4 days. The second question, whether it would go well with salmon, is off topic here since it's pretty much entirely subjective.
Aug
25
comment I have some leftover deep-fried chicken from my fastfood takeaway. Is it safe to store in the fridge and eat it tomorrow?
Well, the downvote arrow does say "does not show any research effort...not useful", and it doesn't take much research to find that cooked food is safe to store in the fridge for a day.
Aug
22
comment How do I use tamarind powder?
@Jolenealasla I don't think you'd thinly slice or dice tamarind...