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3h
comment What is the name of this Italian pastry?
Started to translate, but then I realized this was just copied from Wikipedia. I've replaced the bulk copied content with about what I think you were trying to say. No idea if it has anything to do with the honey-dipped ones the OP mentioned, though.
3h
revised What is the name of this Italian pastry?
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22h
revised Adding sugar and honey to sourdough culture
added 9 characters in body; edited title
1d
comment Substituting milk with whipping cream
@MarcLuxen Crock pot is a brand name for slow cooker, commonly used as a synonym in American English.
1d
awarded  Popular Question
1d
comment Is it safe to store unopened metal cans in the refrigerator?
@JBentley It's possibly a good reason to put them in the fridge a bit before use, but it's not really a good reason to store them there (i.e. long term) and doesn't have much to do with the question of safety.
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revised Difference between brown sugar and white sugar?
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1d
comment How to use slow cooker for cooking meat without it turning into soup or stew?
I see you also self-deleted a comment or two that helped explain exactly what your preferences are. Those are kind of critical to helping people answer your question, so I've edited your question a bit to include the relevant information.
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revised How to use slow cooker for cooking meat without it turning into soup or stew?
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answered How to use slow cooker for cooking meat without it turning into soup or stew?
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comment How to use slow cooker for cooking meat without it turning into soup or stew?
@seasonedaddict It absolutely is related: the answers explain that you need only a very minimal amount of liquid, so you can cook a roast or another large piece of meat without it being a stew. I didn't say it was a duplicate, and I know you want more detailed answers, but at the very least it's a starting place, and other future readers with questions like yours might be willing to read it.
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comment Deep frying and burning eyes
@jdphenix That would've been helpful to include in the question. I almost asked, along with the oil reuse, but I figured you'd have mentioned it!
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comment Deep frying and burning eyes
Okay, dunno if it's the problem, but at least related: cooking.stackexchange.com/q/3014/1672
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comment Deep frying and burning eyes
No visible smoke either? How close are you getting to the smoke point? Do you reuse oil?
2d
comment In what stage should the temperature of meat be taken?
Yeah, I believe so. Just trying to give a rough ballpark so that if the OP does want to experiment they'll have some idea where to start.
2d
comment In what stage should the temperature of meat be taken?
I think the temperature increase ranges very roughly from 5F for smaller things (e.g. chicken) to 10 or 15F for bigger roasts? It's enough to matter, if you're trying to avoid overcooking things, but not enough to give you tons of wiggle room food safety-wise.
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comment Is the mixing order important when substituting white sugar + molasses for brown sugar?
Does the recipe call for creaming the sugars with butter?
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comment Stop my pot splashing me
For what it's worth, a splash guard (if you can make it work - not 100% sure about these specific ideas for making one) is a much better idea than your initial one. A lot of things (vegetables) only need a minute or two in boiling water, so starting from merely warm water means it'll take longer, but it's also hard to predict how long it'll take and you'll be stuck watching carefully to make sure you get it out at the right time.
2d
revised Stop my pot splashing me
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2d
comment Stop my pot splashing me
Please do not self-delete and then post a new answer, especially when your new answer includes the old answer and there are already votes on your answer. Just edit. If people want to change their votes, they can do so after you edit.