Reputation
Next tag badge:
263/400 score
51/80 answers
Badges
11 57 141
Newest
 Constituent
Impact
~3.1m people reached

Jan
28
comment What was Indian food like before the arrival of the chilli from South America?
Thanks for the answer! While I completely agree that nowadays it's hard to imagine Indian cuisine without chilies, claiming that they've always been there (that is, completely contradicting the OP) is going to require more proof than a claim that it was mentioned in Tarikh-Al-Hind. As far as I know, they were originally native only to the Americas.
Jan
28
revised What was Indian food like before the arrival of the chilli from South America?
added 5 characters in body
Jan
28
reviewed Approve What was Indian food like before the arrival of the chilli from South America?
Jan
28
comment How does pineapple tenderize meat?
By the way, if anyone wants to do side-by-side comparisons of marinating with fresh pineapple juice/puree, canned/cooked juice/puree, and a plain acid like lemon juice, I'd happily give a bounty for it.
Jan
28
comment How does pineapple tenderize meat?
Hopefully! Sometimes articles like that can end up misrepresenting or oversimplifying, though. I suspect that the bromelain matters at least some, because there's apparently less of an effect with cooked pineapple than with fresh, but I don't actually know how much less, so it's hard to say whether there's still also significant effects from the acid.
Jan
28
comment When making fried rice, how does the amount of heat affect the taste of the food?
Let us continue this discussion in chat.
Jan
28
comment When making fried rice, how does the amount of heat affect the taste of the food?
@Escoce Indeed, the rice itself isn't burning, but very small amounts of stuff in the pan is, and that imparts flavor. I'm sorry if I made it sound like I meant the bulk of the food you consume was actually burned.
Jan
28
comment How does pineapple tenderize meat?
Unfortunately, the question is not what bromelain does to proteins/meat (though you're totally right about that) it's about how strong the effect is from that compared to any effects from acidity when using pineapple juice.
Jan
28
comment When making fried rice, how does the amount of heat affect the taste of the food?
..."the flavour imparted by chemical compounds results from caramelization, Maillard reactions, and the partial combustion of oil that come from charring and searing of the food at very high heat in excess of 200 °C" (no mention of flavor from gas burning)
Jan
28
comment When making fried rice, how does the amount of heat affect the taste of the food?
@Escoce The part you quoted makes no mention of natural gas burning creating flavor. In fact, the rest of the passage supports the idea that the flavor is not actually from natural gas burning: "it additionally allows for the splattering of fine oil particles to catch the flame into the wok" (there's cooking oil burning) "It should also be noted that cooking with coated woks (e.g. non-stick) will not give the distinct taste of wok hei." (the stuff burning in the pan matters) and...
Jan
28
comment When making fried rice, how does the amount of heat affect the taste of the food?
Okay, so you need a flame. Awesome. And regardless, high flames improve the flavor, agreed. But as I've pointed out, there's a great explanation for why that doesn't involve natural gas combustion flavor. I'm not disagreeing that there may be such a flavor, but I'd like to see some support for the claim that a subtle burned natural gas flavor coming in from outside the wok makes a meaningful contribution when there's a much, much stronger (and much more abundant) flavor from burned rice and oil inside the pan right there with the food.
Jan
28
comment When making fried rice, how does the amount of heat affect the taste of the food?
I don't actually know how well you can do without a flame - that's an assertion that wasn't made in the answer the OP linked. But assuming you can't do well without it... non-flame heat sources don't heat the side of a wok, only the bottom. So they'll be transferring large amounts of heat into less of the food, and causing less caramelizing and burning and smoking inside the wok.
Jan
28
comment When making fried rice, how does the amount of heat affect the taste of the food?
Surely there's far more smoke from the food and oil smoking inside the wok than from the gas burner itself. Gas burns really cleanly, so even if there is a really subtle aroma from it (I've never noticed it, but could be!) it'd surely be covered up by the much stronger aroma from the smoke in the wok. Am I missing something?
Jan
28
comment When making fried rice, how does the amount of heat affect the taste of the food?
I've edited to make this specifically about fried rice, which is what that answer was talking about. Amount of heat certainly affects other things too, but it's a pretty broad question without at least having a specific example to start from. (I've also changed "fire" back to "heat" since that answer never mentioned fire - though it may be relevant as well, as Escoce points out.)
Jan
28
revised When making fried rice, how does the amount of heat affect the taste of the food?
added 18 characters in body; edited title
Jan
28
comment Cobbler vs pie?
Agreed about that too! All just responding to your point that you don't think of shape as the difference. I don't either, but some people who make that style of cobbler might.
Jan
28
comment Cobbler vs pie?
I was talking pretty specifically about regions (or families) in the South that make that kind of cobbler, so UK pies aren't too relevant - I suppose it's possible that they also have deep-dish pies like that in Georgia, but I suspect most pies are the typical shallower ones. But anyway, the square vs round is the more obvious difference to be sure.
Jan
28
comment Cobbler vs pie?
I guess if you make the Georgia style that the OP mentioned (with a bottom crust) then you do think that the dish is the main difference - square and deeper vs round and shallower. But I suspect that's the exception, not the rule, with cobbler also meaning no bottom crust in most cases.
Jan
28
awarded  Nice Question
Jan
28
comment
I'm in California and rumtscho is in Germany, so unless someone from Asia runs, I don't think we're going to get additional time zone coverage this time around - always good to be aware of though!