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Aug
23
comment I left fully cooked lasagna out all night
@aaronut: And I didn't add caveats, where? The bias here is so far the other direction that any statement of the form "this probably won't kill you" is viewed as the rankest heresy.
Aug
22
comment I left fully cooked lasagna out all night
@michael: This is the same USDA that thinks I need to cook my thanksgiving turkey to 165F, right? They make recommendations for being as close to 100% safe as possible. Overnight lasagna ain't it. Nor a hamburger with pink in it, or a pork loin with juice in it, and you can throw your steak tartare out the fricking window, because that is like the worst thing imaginable from their point of view...Or you can accept that sometimes its worth not being 100% safe.
Aug
22
comment I left fully cooked lasagna out all night
@michael: It'll find a layer of cheese, which is a crappy growth medium (it's dry, and it's the byproduct of a ton of intensive bacterial growth, which means less food for newcomers). And then a layer of tomato sauce, which is a crappy growth medium (it's acidic and salty). And no, I wouldn't serve it in a restaurant. Restaurants are like hospitals: you'll find more germs there than any other sort of kitchen, and more potential cross contamination. They are held to a high standard for a reason. In a home environment? The risk is much lower. It's not nil, but I wouldn't worry about eating it.
Aug
22
comment I left fully cooked lasagna out all night
@michael: With a double rate of about 20 minutes, you'd need 10 hours just to get one billion, assuming the contamination was instant, the food was in the dangerzone, and also that the food was an ideal growth medium. In practice, you're more likely to get the e coli poisoning from your side salad. I'd put it at higher risk than raw eggs, but at a lower risk than raw chicken.
Aug
22
comment I left fully cooked lasagna out all night
Well, if my lasagna had a bunch of living staph or e coli in it after I'd cooked it, I'd think there were bigger problems than it sitting out for a while. There are more sensible bacteria to be concerned about in cooked food, at home.
Aug
22
comment What is blind baking?
@johnny: You have to watch out. You don't want to bake peas or beans INTO your crust, or you'll be sitting there for an hour prying them out with a knife.
Aug
22
comment How do I get rid of mayonnaise smell?
Can you post something of your recipe (at least the ingredients)?
Aug
22
comment I left fully cooked lasagna out all night
@michael: Eh. I think the lasagna would be fine, but I agree that you shouldn't think heating makes you safer.
Aug
20
comment How can I remove mold stains from a pan?
No more harmful than the chlorine in your pool, or your municipal water.
Aug
16
comment Cooking Cauliflower so it doesn't fall apart?
@rumtscho: I'm prejudiced. I steam. I sautee. I grill. I very seldom blanch.
Aug
16
comment Cooking Cauliflower so it doesn't fall apart?
I do it on the grill sometimes with olive oil and a little balsamic vinegar to finish it off.
Aug
15
comment Why do adult humans drink milk while no other animal does?
It is also worth noting that most carnivores will eat milk/dairy given the opportunity. We're pretty much the only one that has the ability to harvest dairy though, so it seems like we have a monopoly.
Aug
6
comment Why are my canning lids popped out?
@aaronut: Sure, now, but the use of salt as a preservative is largely based on pre-refrigeration techniques. These days, salt, even excessive salt, is more about flavor.
Aug
6
comment Why are my canning lids popped out?
@aaronut: Salt is effective, but only in extremely high concentrations, where you're using it primarily for it's properties as a dessicant. The more water you put in the equation, the less effective it is. Any salt-preserved food that doesn't need to be soaked prior to human consumption isn't salty enough to retard bacterial growth without refrigeration.
Aug
5
comment Is it really necessary to wash a skillet that will be heated up again soon?
@aaronut: Well, I'm in the "Don't need no damn water on my cast iron" camp, but I don't leave food sitting in it either. I wouldn't be worried about bacteria the next day (as long as food wasn't being added to a cold pan), but I would be concerned about lingering tastes, because remaining oils will pick up flavours.
Aug
5
comment Is it really necessary to wash a skillet that will be heated up again soon?
Salmonella bacteria die at ~145F, and while I like my eggs cooked lower than that, I usually let my skillet get much hotter.
Aug
1
comment How long do you cook the vegetables in a pasta salad recipe?
I agree with Kate. If you're going to do anything with them, just steam the hard veggies (broccoli, carrots, etc) very very briefly. Soggy veggy pasta salad doesn't sound very appetizing.
Jul
15
comment looking for edible paper
Vietnamese egg rolls (Chả giò) are traditionally made with rice paper. You might also try filo dough, if you're not wholly into the paper thing. It's not paper, but it's paper-like.
Jul
6
comment Is honey considered vegan?
+1: If you take anything (other than excrement...Probably) from anything that has eyes or a face, it's not vegan.
Jun
20
comment Does the drying out of vegetables affect the taste after cooking?
@anisha: Yea, when they turn brown? If you were cutting up potatoes, I'd definitely tell you to put 'em in water. Avocado, I'd just tell you not to cut up (lemon juice works, but it changes the taste, obviously). Onions and peppers would be fine.