300 reputation
514
bio website staugustinefootville.org
location United States
age 30
visits member for 3 years, 10 months
seen Oct 14 '13 at 17:30

Faithful Catholic - Father of 4, Husband of 1

Delphi, Java and PHP programmer from Southern Wisconsin.

Fairly proud Herzing, UW Madison and UW Rock County Alum


Feb
9
awarded  Notable Question
Sep
6
awarded  Popular Question
Aug
25
awarded  Notable Question
Mar
6
awarded  Notable Question
Aug
10
comment Canning in a Pressure Cooker
The pressure cooker cooks just fine at medium low on the stove and requires only 2-3 inches of water, none of which boils off or gets nasty. Boiling water canners have tons of water evaporate. (Also, I didn't say I'm cooking fruit, I'm doing tomato sauce, which requires a lengthy stay in the water).
Aug
10
asked Canning in a Pressure Cooker
Jul
20
awarded  Popular Question
Jun
8
awarded  Constituent
Jun
8
awarded  Caucus
Mar
20
awarded  Popular Question
Sep
14
awarded  Yearling
Aug
23
awarded  Nice Question
Feb
8
awarded  Nice Question
Feb
8
awarded  Commentator
Feb
8
comment
+1 In this domain at least, real cooking questions have real cooking answers.
Feb
8
comment Achieving perfection via manual drip-brew coffee method
I accepted this answer because it's objectively awesome. But I've got one last question you might be able to edit into the answer. Can the last 10-20 seconds of drainage spoil the cup, should I remove the filter after I'm done pouring water - or let everything go into the cup?
Feb
8
accepted Achieving perfection via manual drip-brew coffee method
Feb
5
comment Achieving perfection via manual drip-brew coffee method
@mgb, 2 reasons, 1. It's really cheap (got a melitta travler for 8 bucks) 2. Very little cleanup - so I can make it quietly every morning. Also, I remember Alton Brown on Good Eats saying and demonstrating this to be the best possible way to make a cup of coffee.
Feb
3
comment Achieving perfection via manual drip-brew coffee method
I don't understand step 11, why do you need 2 tea kettles? Personally, I have a problem with my kettle I use on the stove, I can't pour it very evenly, so I usually just drip it down the side - but I've heard this is no good because it cools the water down too much.
Feb
2
comment Achieving perfection via manual drip-brew coffee method
I've heard to wait 30 seconds after wetting the grounds. I think the one thing that it does do is ensure that your initial few seconds of pouring doesn't go right through the grounds. I've tried both ways, and you just get clear liquid if you don't wet them.