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seen 16 hours ago

16h
comment How can I make these cookies less sweet without ruining the texture?
@hoc_age: you keep asking questions to which the answer is already in my question, or at least implied by my question. Namely, no, I have not tried other types of sugar, reducing the sugar, other types of flour, or any of the other myriad possibilities, because if I wanted to waste time, money, and calories on dozens of experiments, I wouldn't have bothered posting a question. The whole point of asking a question is so that someone who has actual experience can post an answer, based on said experience.
1d
comment British “pot” of whipping cream?
"Pot"? Can you quote a recipe that uses this? On the face of it, if it says "[measurement] of whipping cream", I'd expect it to be unwhipped, while "[measurement] of whipped cream" could be expected to be whipped, but recipe writers are often sloppy with their language. What do other, similar recipes say?
1d
comment How can I make these cookies less sweet without ruining the texture?
@hoc_age, the problem with your answer is that you don't address the problem of how changing the sugar changes the texture. In fact, you're suggesting using sugar alcohols which, by your own admission, "yield some disastrous [results]". If I wanted to waste a bunch of time and ingredients (not to mention ingested calories) on experimentation, I wouldn't have posted a question.
2d
comment How can I make these cookies less sweet without ruining the texture?
Also, I'm hoping someone has some advice to offer based on personal experience so I can avoid the few dozen batches. :)
2d
comment How can I make these cookies less sweet without ruining the texture?
Sugar substitutes tend to be, if anything, sweeter than sugar. Also more bitter/metallic/what-have-you, but definitely sweeter. I'm not trying to reduce the calories; I'm trying to reduce the sweetness.
2d
awarded  Promoter
Dec
21
asked How can I make these cookies less sweet without ruining the texture?
Dec
19
revised How can I melt cheese for dipping?
spelling
Dec
18
reviewed Approve Egg yolk sizes changed over the years?
Dec
12
comment Are there any differences between preparing/cooking a turkey that was labeled “basted with real butter” vs a regular turkey?
Whenever I see ad copy that blares "blah blah blah REAL BUTTER", the question that comes to mind is "as opposed to imaginary butter?" :p
Dec
10
comment What kind of pan is this? (photo) How would you use it?
@WayfaringStranger: I actually looked through all 468 patents, because sometimes people get multiple patents for similar things, and I was hoping that textured pan would show up somewhere. Unfortunately, Mr. G. E. Savage only had the single patent granted on this date.
Dec
10
comment How can I be sure I'm buying the right KitchenAid beaters?
I bought a bowl-scraping beater not too long ago. It works perfectly with my KitchenAid purchased new about 18 years ago, but it will not work with my sister's KitchenAid purchased used at a garage sale about 15 years ago: the beater cannot be forced onto the shaft far enough to engage the little sticky-outy part that makes the beater stay on while you're mixing. The two mixers look completely identical. Moral of the story: make sure you keep your receipts. :)
Dec
10
answered What kind of pan is this? (photo) How would you use it?
Dec
9
comment What is the difference between pancetta and bacon?
Uh, whatever gave you the idea that bacon isn't cured?
Dec
7
answered What direction must one stir molten chocolate?
Dec
7
comment What direction must one stir molten chocolate?
Yeah, this is an old, old, old myth. It probably had some logic behind it originally - perhaps the "not incorporating air" that Stephen mentioned - but people who repeat it do so without any knowledge of said logic. (My mother drives me nuts with it.)
Dec
5
comment How can I make my Oreos crispy again?
Oy, now I'm really tempted to leave out some cookies just so I can try this out. Problem is, it's December, and the air conditioners have been packed away.
Dec
4
comment Fabric to be used for cheesecloth
I've used cloth diapers. Yes, the kind you fold multiple times. Even as a single layer, the fabric used would make absolutely crappy cheesecloth (pun fully intended). Nappies need soft, absorbent fabric, which --like I said-- is exactly the opposite of what you need for cheesecloth.
Dec
4
comment Fabric to be used for cheesecloth
This is like asking "what fruit can I use to make apples?" Cheesecloth is a type of fabric, specifically a loose-woven, untreated fabric suitable for straining foods. If you don't have any cheesecloth, you can make do with similar fabrics, like a gauze, but that doesn't mean that you've made cheesecloth.
Dec
4
comment Fabric to be used for cheesecloth
Diapers that resemble cheesecloth would be singularly useless as diapers, and cheesecloth that resembles a diaper would also be quite useless as a filtering mechanism. I mean, you can't get more diametrically opposed as far as intended purpose than a diaper and a cheesecloth.