6,047 reputation
1825
bio website blog.jagaimo.com
location United States
age 41
visits member for 4 years, 6 months
seen 12 hours ago

My StackOverflow CV

Ceramic collector, obsessive cook, entrepreneur and professional geek.

I was doing a one-person consultancy for a couple of years, doing some Rails stuff, some .Net services work, and some work in Groovy/Java for a pharmaceutical firm called Dendreon. When that project wrapped up, I took a Rails-focused job at a hybrid Ruby/C# shop, Getty Images.

I'm interested in functional languages like Scala and F# but have relatively limited real-world experience with them.

In previous lives, I've worked for Microsoft, Revenue Science (now Audience Science), Zillow, and a travel company called Virtuoso, the Seattle Times, and a very strange financial/transportation conglomerate.

My long term professional ambition is to find a way to work from Tokyo/Kawasaki/Yokohama either 100% or via frequent travel or remote work opportunities. If you're interested in tracking down a reasonably competent Rails or ASP.net MVC guy and are located near Seattle, WA or Tokyo, Japan or don't mind me working mostly remotely, feel free to contact me.


1d
comment What should I substitute for dried anchovies and kelp in a stock
Glad I could help. It looks like there's some ambiguity in Norway regarding the difference between stockfish (usu. unsalted) and clipfish (salted before drying), so perhaps there are unsalted alternatives? en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stockfish or nl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stokvis_(voedsel)
2d
comment What should I substitute for dried anchovies and kelp in a stock
I would think there must be some species of laminaria that would do the trick, @sourd'oh; that sounds reasonable. But there may not be a commercial harvesting market for it in Norway. I did sea that there's a species harvested in Iceland called laminaria digitata (hrossapari) that may have similar properties.
2d
comment What should I substitute for dried anchovies and kelp in a stock
I was mystified by "dashi" as a substitute for dashi, myself, then I looked at the Wikipedia article and I realized how someone could come to that conclusion. That article talks about a product known as dashi-no-moto (instant soup stock), which again is only likely to be easy to find in an area which has Asian groceries available. Also nori would provide no meaningful foundation for soup stock.
Mar
30
comment Is Italian style gelato achievable with standard home ice cream makers and home freezers?
Gelato shops don't generally put their gelato in freezers that get as cold as the one you'd have at home. Most ice cream makers I've seen basically produce a ready-to-serve gelato texture if you use the right fat ratio, but once you freeze it, it becomes essentially what we used to call ice milk.
Mar
30
comment Can I turn a can of red kidney beans into red bean paste for Japanese Style Red Bean Paste Buns?
See also cooking.stackexchange.com/questions/27495/…
Mar
27
comment Pitas are paper thin on one side
In pita the bubble is desirable and important; one big bubble should form to get the expected "pocket" structure.
Mar
17
comment Is it okay to eat silver
Gold foil for food is stamped so incredibly thin that you can barely touch it without it shrinking; I've only worked with edible gold leaf, I wouldn't be surprised if the same were true for silver as well.
Mar
3
comment Soaking fruit in alcohol
I have seen substantial mellowing and improved complexity from 1 month vs. 6 months (and my wife's favorites are usually the ones that have been untouched over a year) but I also don't use much sugar in most of mine. But I'm completely passive most of the time; I used to stir on occasion but mostly because I felt like I should be more involved.
Feb
27
comment Can you make sourdough starter without throwing any away?
Also known as the Grain of Rice story or the Wheat and Chessboard problem. jwilson.coe.uga.edu/EMT668/EMAT6680.F99/Martin/… or en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wheat_and_chessboard_problem
Feb
23
comment I am trying to cook Buta no Kakuni or Japanese pork belly but it's tough
I've had good luck producing it in a reasonable amount of time with a pressure cooker. I don't know if you used naga-negi (which looks more like a skinny leek than a scallion) or not, but that will affect flavor more than texture.
Feb
12
comment Turning home made chicken stock into broth
Unfortunately the broth vs. stock distinction is driven by culinary folklore, which means definitions are far from universal. I was going more or less by this one: thekitchn.com/…
Feb
12
comment Turning home made chicken stock into broth
So with a little math, doesn't that give you your answer? Broth is essentially seasoned stock.
Feb
12
comment Turning home made chicken stock into broth
Can you melt some of them and measure the volume? Ice cube trays are far less standardized than you might think.
Jan
31
comment How can I light charcoal faster?
It basically heats the charcoal to the ignition point, if I understand how it works correctly, so that's a pretty good way of getting them going. It's a pretty impressive fire within a short amount of time.
Jan
22
comment Baked beans still firm after soaking and hours of cooking
I'm not sure I understand. Did you boil the soaked beans first before baking? If canned beans are the usual ingredient for your recipe, they are equivalent to boiled beans.
Dec
30
comment What are the advantages of “bathed” bread?
Does it come in contact with the water? Cheesecloth is usually porous, so I would imagine so; some starches near the surface would wash away, concentrating gluten at the outer layer.
Dec
25
comment How can I replace apples with peaches?
Slightly underripe peaches may caramelize without destroying the texture. However, I tend to prefer roasting or grilling if I want to caramelize peaches.
Dec
25
comment How can I replace apples with peaches?
Baked apples caramelize as well, but a dutch baby doesn't bake long enough in my experience, and the contact with the moist batter may reduce the maximum heat they'll reach. In my experience very ripe peaches (probably not available this time of the year in N. Hemisphere) will not lose much moisture in a saute, but they will become softer; this isn't a desirable trait because then you'll lose all the texture of the peach, and if you wanted to do that you could just buy them canned.
Dec
21
comment Seeking a creamy/melty Swiss Cheese commonly available in the US
I've almost always used Appenzeller in a blend with Emmenthaler and Gruyere for fondue, in which it melts just fine; I've not really tried it in a hot sandwich. I'd probably just eat it on its own before I would think of that :)
Dec
20
comment Seeking a creamy/melty Swiss Cheese commonly available in the US
Appenzeller has a stronger, funkier smell than either Gruyere or Emmenthaler. Emmenthaler occasionally has holes but it's more accident than design; the mass producers of the product known as "swiss cheese" in the US were perhaps inspired by Emmentaler, but decided that the holes matter more than the flavor.