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visits member for 4 years, 10 months
seen May 19 at 4:41

Please welcome Iron Chef Canada who will be preparing his signature dish, Kraft Dinner Bouillabaisse avec Tartiflette Poutine et Sirop d'érable.

AKA:

  • Aaronaught (Stack Overflow)
  • Aarobot (Meta Stack Overflow)

May
12
comment How do I pound chicken (or other meat) without making a mess?
Quite a few answers already mention clingwrap; I'm not sure what this one is adding, aside from spelling errors.
May
8
comment What's the fastest way to hull a strawberry?
What is "16#"? Is that a quantity or is it referring to a list somewhere? I can't tell if this is intended as an answer or comment.
Apr
12
comment How can you reduce the heat of a chili pepper?
The skin has a very low concentration of capsaicin. The highest concentration is in the placenta.
Apr
2
comment What parameter is best to increase - time or temperature?
Thawing it first is the best thing to do. Heating from frozen is generally a losing proposition no matter how you play with the parameters.
Mar
29
comment Will spoiled food technically make you sick?
A "theory" is the result of scientific agreement after sufficient data has been gathered, usually by many researchers replicating the same experiment under controlled conditions, and it has the ability to reliably predict future events. What you're referring to might charitably be called a "hypothesis", except that hypotheses don't get published until they've actually been extensively tested. I can promise you there's no research being done on "spoiled" food because "spoiled" isn't a scientific term. There is tons of research on specific pathogens though; search scholar.google.com.
Mar
29
comment Will spoiled food technically make you sick?
"anecdotal stories are the start of scientific research" - false. Even if it were true, there's no logic in continuing to rely on anecdotes after the research has been done.
Mar
28
comment Will spoiled food technically make you sick?
I wouldn't equate mold with bacteria. Most mold is bad, with only a small variety of strains being used in cheese-making; conversely, most bacteria are benign, and only a handful of strains cause serious problems.
Mar
28
comment Will spoiled food technically make you sick?
Ugh, more anecdotal evidence on food safety. This really is complete nonsense. Perhaps the biggest problem with anecdotes like this is that when people say "I/he/she didn't get sick", they invariably mean that they didn't appear to get sick immediately afterward. The problem is that sickness can develop hours or even days later, and by that time, most people have forgotten about the original incident. Anyway, you can tell that this is unscientific because it refers to fermentation culturing, and dry-aging as "intentionally spoiled".
Mar
28
comment Why are there no recipes combining both yeast and baking powder?
Folks, please do not post recipes as answers to this question. The question didn't ask for recipes, and we don't allow recipe requests.
Mar
26
comment Will spoiled food technically make you sick?
The moral of the story is: Don't ever assume that what you just ate was what caused you to get sick, and as a corollary, don't assume that you're "in the clear" if you manage to get through the night after eating something unsafe. Food poisoning isn't just hard to trace, it's basically impossible, and most people have dangerously wrong ideas about how accurately they can identify the cause.
Mar
15
comment Why Does a Lot of Pastry Have an Orange Flavor?
Are you sure it's orange, and not just vaguely citrus? Ascorbic acid is a fairly common ingredient in commercial pastries. I've never been able to taste it, but maybe some people are more sensitive.
Mar
15
comment meatballs refrozen, safe to eat
"In the teens" doesn't sound like "above freezing temp". First of all, we don't know whether your numbers are supposed to be in °C or °F. "Teens" in C is way above freezing temperature, and in F it's actually below freezing temperature. Can you please clarify?
Mar
15
comment What is this black stuff coming off my George Forman grill?
Re: Using the top rack - most dishwashers have the heating element near the bottom rack. Items that are claimed to be safe in the top rack only might melt or warp if you wash them in the bottom rack.
Mar
8
comment Why does my chicken go dry when I boil it?
I wouldn't say "never boil", although I might say "never boil meat". Aside from starches, there are reasons to boil things: Candy-making, blanching, canning, or even just working with certain ingredients e.g. agar-agar. Also, we shouldn't perpetuate the myth that cooked or even rare meat has "blood" - it's myoglobin.
Mar
8
comment Why does my chicken go dry when I boil it?
Also, I feel like this has to be a duplicate, but there are so many questions here about dry chicken that searching for the one on food science is like finding a needle in a haystack... anyone want to try their luck?
Mar
8
comment Why does my chicken go dry when I boil it?
Why does this seem odd to you? Have you not noticed that your own skin dries out when you take a long shower or repeatedly wash your hands? It is, in fact, mostly water to begin with. Not "saturated with" water but actually water.
Mar
5
comment Extremely Tender Hospital Beef
Velveting is mostly done as preparation for high-heat cooking methods e.g. stir-frying, which I highly doubt would be used in a hospital, and wouldn't produce especially tender meat anyway. It's more about the surface texture. Far more likely that it was cooked low-and-slow - probably by a distributor and not the hospital itself.
Mar
4
comment Why is fish not considered as meat?
Who said anything about the "vegetarian society"? And what, if any, is their claim to authority on that question? I'm pretty sure Buddhism predates the "vegetarian society" by many centuries (possibly millenia).
Mar
4
comment Why do patterns appear on tempered chocolate?
@PaulGuyot: Don't get it wet, is the simple answer. Too much moisture can actually cause it to seize and completely ruin it. Water baths might cause problems if you use them in an enclosed area, e.g. underneath a range hood. Personally, I don't use a water bath or let good chocolate anywhere near water. Also, not applicable here specifically, but as a general rule you need to work very quickly when coating things like fruit, especially when frozen. In those cases, sometimes it also helps to divide the tempered chocolate into smaller portions so moisture doesn't accumulate endlessly.
Mar
1
comment What's the difference between fresh and frozen blueberries for baking?
I agree, the question needs to be rephrased but it is a real question, specifically one that seems to be trying to address a fundamental misunderstanding about what frozen fruits (or veggies) are.