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Jul
20
comment How much meat should I serve per person?
Yes, before cooking of course. Who buys meat based on the cooked weight? :D And @DanC - it's brisket and pulled pork, so it's definitely a BBQ...
Jul
16
comment Toffee that is soft?
What you need is fudge rather than toffee. That basically means much more fat (butter and condensed milk, usually), but the results are much softer and easier on the teeth (in terms of stickability, not decay!)
Jul
14
comment How to make the marshmallow swirl for Chocolate Marshmallow Ice cream from scratch?
I would say reducing the amount of gelatin in a standard recipe would give softer, more swirlable results.
Jul
9
comment Are cooking thermometers essential?
@oxinabox Amazon has plenty to choose from
Jul
6
comment Why did my meringue deflate and go soft?
How much sugar? Was there any liquid at the bottom of the bowl when you removed the egg whites?
Jun
25
comment Why does some frozen food puff up when defrosting?
The food isn't expanding when it warms up, the air in the packaging is.
Jun
24
comment When is it OK to cook a burger medium?
"Meat from supermarkets is washed and "cleaned" with so many chemical products that you can eat anything raw as long as it's fresh." - this is not true at best and dangerous at worst.
Jun
22
comment Can a water bath be used to bake brownies?
As @jefromi suggests I would A) lower my oven temperature B) take my brownies out sooner (remember, brownies should be fudgy in the middle!) or C) invest in a light coloured pan that won't radiate as much heat onto the brownies' edges.
Jun
22
comment Dense and gluey centered cake problem
The usual procedure is to mix the butter and sugar, then add the eggs one at a time, beating in between, then add the flour and just barely mix it. You appear to have thrown everything together and mixed it for all it's worth. I also note you have no raising agent listed, like baking powder. Do you have a recipe link?
Jun
20
comment Traveling with food just cooked
How long is the journey?
Jun
4
comment Making Pâté à bombe without sugar thermometer
Do you have a digital probe thermometer?
May
26
comment oil splattering covers
I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because A) answers are prone to becoming out of date B) a simple Google will return hundreds of likely results.
May
22
comment Close the lid of unsealed jar with pop-up lid
Nope, more like 2-3.
May
22
comment Close the lid of unsealed jar with pop-up lid
Technically it won't be safe after more than a few hours at room temperature. No, you can't seal it again.
May
15
comment Seasoning No-Stick Frying Pan
This mentions what I was going to say: don't put non-stick cookware in the dishwasher if you want it to remain non-stick. Don't even use soap, just wash it with hot water.
May
13
comment Preparing slow cooked meats for the next day
I guess you could keep the meat in the cooking liquor, though it might take longer to cool down in that case.
May
12
comment What is the best way to cook chicken for enchiladas?
'always cook chicken to an internal temperature of at least 165F (74C). In my opinion thighs are better much longer cooked than that' Longer, but not necessarily hotter.
May
7
comment Is cooking with fruit liqueur comparable to cooking with fruit juice?
Actually I'm afraid you're incorrect. The idea that alcohol completely evaporates during anything but relatively long cooking is a myth, as shown by this study: ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1556354, summarised here: whatscookingamerica.net/Q-A/AlcoholCooking.htm. Even a 2.5 hour braise will leave around 5% of the alcohol behind; flambeeing will leave 75%.
May
7
comment How can I cook a full chicken with skin on it when my oven is broken?
You will not be able to cook the whole chicken with a frying pan alone. You will need to joint the chicken - ie split it up into its component joints. Failing that, do you have some other way of creating indirect heat, like a barbecue?
May
6
comment Why does my colander feel slimy after I use it to drain pasta?
As an aside to your question, tipping out the pasta along with water straight into the colander is the wrong way to go about things. You have just spent 10 minutes getting rid of the starch, then you go and pour it back all over the pasta. Instead, use a pasta server or tongs to remove the pasta from the water, then place it in the colander to strain. Voilà: no slimy colander, no starchy pasta, and you have the added benefit of having pasta water which you can use to thicken your sauce.