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seen Sep 9 at 10:16

Aug
10
awarded  Citizen Patrol
Dec
6
awarded  Popular Question
Nov
4
comment How do you peel chickpeas?
@Jay: it’s absolutely because of gravity! It is indeed because the skins are less dense than water — but similarly, the fact an apple falls is because it’s more dense than air. The falling/rising, in either case, comes from the combination of gravity and the density difference. Fun fact: because of this connection, an old name for density is “specific gravity”.
Jul
22
awarded  Notable Question
Jan
14
awarded  Yearling
Oct
23
awarded  Critic
Apr
3
awarded  Popular Question
Jan
14
awarded  Yearling
May
23
comment Are Twiglets an “extruded snack”?
@Aaronut: This question was my attempt to phrase it in a way that would admit a clear and definitive answer — but yes, I’d certainly be interested in the more general questions “What exactly does extruded snack mean?” and “How are Twiglets made?”
May
23
comment Are Twiglets an “extruded snack”?
@Martha F. et al: thankyou! Reading around further, Cheetos and Cheese Puffs seem to be well-known US examples.
May
23
revised Are Twiglets an “extruded snack”?
added American-known examples
May
22
asked Are Twiglets an “extruded snack”?
Mar
27
awarded  Nice Answer
Mar
7
answered What's a good resource for knowing what spices are and what to use them in?
Mar
7
comment What's a good resource for knowing what spices are and what to use them in?
+1 for most of this, except for “be very conservative in your early experiments”! Especially when things are difficult to taste-test, I think being a bit reckless in early experimenting helps — it does mean you (and perhaps your family) will get the occasional flawed dish, but you will learn a lot about taste from it, and find your way to better spice use much faster!
Mar
7
comment What to serve at a cheese tasting?
+1 — excellent suggestions, and beautifully explained. If you’re able to get good white grapes — ideally a bit less sweet than they usually come in the UK/US — they’re another fruit that could work well (and might nicely evoke the idea of wine). On the crackers front, I’ve found Scottish/English style oatcakes work very well with hard aged cheeses, if you can get them — they’re usually findable in Commonwealth countries in my experience, but I’ve not seen them much in the US.
Feb
19
comment What is a good vegetarian source of umami flavour?
Vegemite (Australian approximate equivalent of Marmite) is also very good, and slightly different — a little sweeter and less astringent, so goes better in some delicate dishes.
Feb
19
comment What is a good vegetarian source of umami flavour?
Sun-dried tomatoes are excellent — tomatoes are already high on the list above, and the drying concentrates it. (Also, @Orbling: ahh, I love Nori. Love, love love it. Can eat it like candy… )
Feb
19
comment Where can I buy kosher salt in London?
I think this answer really gets to the main point. Most US recipes that ask for Kosher salt don’t need many of its specific qualities: they just need a decent-quality large-grain salt, and for most of the 20th century in most of the US, Kosher salt was the only option for this, so it became the term recipes use. So in the UK, a good sea salt will likely be the most appropriate option.
Feb
19
comment How long can hard cheeses last in a refrigerator?
@AlberT: Would you think of ‘Londra’ as an antonomasia for ‘London’? Calling parmigiano ‘parmesan’ is very closely analogous, for me and many other UK English speakers, to calling Roma ‘Rome’. The anglicised form ‘parmesan’ is older than modern mass-produced cheese!