983 reputation
513
bio website
location Seattle, WA
age 29
visits member for 3 years, 7 months
seen Sep 17 '11 at 0:43

May
19
awarded  Popular Question
Jan
21
awarded  Yearling
Dec
15
awarded  Notable Question
Jan
21
awarded  Yearling
Oct
19
awarded  Nice Question
Oct
11
awarded  Popular Question
Jan
21
awarded  Yearling
Nov
27
awarded  Enlightened
Nov
26
awarded  Nice Answer
Jun
27
comment How do I scale a recipe that calls for boiling off liquid?
Yeah - you'd have to have basically double the surface area simmering then in order to get a simmer with twice the liquid boiling off. Doing the pre-boil of the liquid should work though with simmering.
Jun
27
answered How do I scale a recipe that calls for boiling off liquid?
Jun
21
awarded  Nice Answer
Jun
13
revised At what point is water considered “at a boil?”
Added more specificity about the difference between simmering & air coming out of solution.
Jun
13
answered At what point is water considered “at a boil?”
Mar
29
comment How to serve oranges so it is easy for guests to enjoy them?
Hi Tech Method: cookingissues.com/2010/03/23/enzymatic-peeling-hell-yes (note they got a giant bucket of the enzyme and will sell you all you need for a long time for $20)
Mar
4
comment Is there a magic ingredient that keeps ice-cream soft?
They call it "Natural Tara Gum". I agree that the "Natural" thing is pretty ridiculous. :)
Mar
4
comment Do all modern electric stoves have “binary” heating elements?
That's possible. Another thing to consider is that since the surface is transparent, there is likely additional radiant heat when the element is on. I tried turning on my glass ceramic stove and almost immediately could feel heat a good 2-3 feet above the burner, so I think that pretty clearly means that there's a good bit of radiant heat that could cause the faster boil. It seems like they could easily solve this by just coating the bottom of the glass with black paint. I wonder if the additional radiant heat is desirable, or maybe the paint just wouldn't be aesthetically pleasing.
Mar
4
comment Is there a magic ingredient that keeps ice-cream soft?
I just had a thought that Breyer's All Natural ice creams don't harden with time in the freezer (though as I recall, they used too, and I remember being surprised when they stopped hardening up) and I thought they didn't have any stabilizers. Well, I just looked at their website and they somewhat recently started stabilizing their natural Ice Creams with Tara Gum. So I guess that's why their ice creams stay soft so much longer now. I thought that maybe my freezer was not as cold or something. I guess now I can buy 20 cartons at a time instead of my normal 10!
Mar
1
awarded  Nice Answer
Mar
1
comment Do all modern electric stoves have “binary” heating elements?
Thanks for the explanation! I updated the answer to reflect this.