46,476 reputation
9105201
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location Germany
age 31
visits member for 4 years, 3 months
seen 9 hours ago

Food is interesting. I usually think about it at around why + 7.

For every natural phenomenon there are different levels of explanation. I like to call these "why" values. For the first value of why, the question "Why is the sky blue?" can be answered with some simple hand-waving about light from the sun passing through our planet's atmosphere. For a value of why + 2 (also known to parents as, "But whyyyyy?") you have to start talking about the fact that light comes in different colors.

M. Koerth-Baker

Also, I like the idea of cake more than cake itself.


11h
answered What can I add to Splenda solution to prevent spoilage?
12h
revised What can I add to Splenda solution to prevent spoilage?
"water" solution could have been anything
14h
revised Can I keep herbs fresh by spraying them with fertilizer?
we already have questions about keeping them fresh in general, this is much more specific
2d
revised Should I actually add nutmeg to eggnog?
removed "what spices go with" question part, this is off topic
2d
comment How to get the pits out of clingstone peaches for peach butter
With a real clingstone peach, there is no "half that held onto it", it is "the 70% peach still sticking to the stone on each side" as opposed to the small rag which came off into your hand.
2d
comment Whisk eggs without an electric whisker
While I agree it's possible, I don't know if I'd use it for macarons. The proper technique has to be learned - despite having done it every now and then, my hand whipped egg whites (French meringue) always end up somewhat stiffer and weepier than the machine whipped ones, which is problematic for very sensitive applications. And if you are using Swiss meringue, you are going to have to whip for a long time even with an electric mixer, your hand will really be very, very tired with a hand whisk. Macarons are frustrating enough as it is, no need to make them more so.
May
18
comment How do I seal ice cream containers?
There probably are machines for this, and I hope that somebody will answer about them. But why do you want it in the first place? If you simply want an airtight seal to prevent freezer burn, plastic containers with a "no leak" gasket are the most convenient option. A "no tamper" seal is rarely needed at home.
May
17
comment Gluten & MSG free substitute for Parmesan?
@user3169 MSG and other glutamates are common in many foods. As far as I know, it is created in parmesan by the aging process, as milk does not have it. Other foods literally grow it, such as grapes, or the algae from which it is extracted for use as an additive. Glutamate is ubiquitous in human, animal and plant tissues.
May
17
comment Can I use amaranth flour or anothef flour as a substitute for white flour?
see cooking.stackexchange.com/questions/21769/…. You certainly can't make a substitution, but an addition might be possible.
May
17
reviewed Approve How to make big, fluffy “Mexican-style” flour tortillas (without using any special machinery)?
May
17
comment Is boiling milk a form of pasteurization, especially in Mongolia?
I am not even sure that this is somehow related to Mongolian language or Mongolian cuisine. Boiled milk is boiled milk everywhere. It's also unlikely that the Lonely Planet writer was a Mongolian, or that he used the English word "boil" in some strange Mongolian sense.
May
17
answered Gluten & MSG free substitute for Parmesan?
May
15
comment How to increase the perceived sweetness of homemade lemonade without sweeteners?
I got rid of the references to "natural" and "healthy" while stating your objective constraint (as far as I understood it; I assume "natural" means you don't want standard artificial sweeteners such as saccharine). Is this OK so? You can edit it further if I got it wrong, the point is to formulate it in a way such that we don't get lists of "use honey, that's good for you" style answers.
May
15
revised How to increase the perceived sweetness of homemade lemonade without sweeteners?
as discussed in comments: made it clear that OP is not looking for a standard sweetener
May
15
comment How to increase the perceived sweetness of homemade lemonade without sweeteners?
@fizban OK, this opens a different can of worms (in the sense that the perception of nonsweet ingredients as "sweetening" is individual) but I think we can experiment with that. I'll edit and reopen the question, let's see what kind of answers appear.
May
15
comment How to increase the perceived sweetness of homemade lemonade without sweeteners?
Hello Fiztban, I have to close the question in its current form. "Natural" or "healthy" is not something we can use as a criterion, so I could throw out this part of the question, which leaves "how to make lemonade sweet" and the answer will be "Add any sweetener". If you need some more information, and have some other constraint than "I want to add a healthy sweetener", you can edit the question and we can reopen. As it is, I don't see much point of having it open after we remove the health constraint.
May
15
reviewed Approve What's the purpose of a bread box?
May
15
comment How do you clean and season a cast iron pot?
Hello! I closed as a duplicate of the "how to clean" question. We also have tons of questions about how to season it - click on the "cast-iron" tag under your question and you will see a list of all questions about it, and many of them are about seasoning. You can also use the search box in the upper right corner.
May
14
comment How to keep battered (tempura) goods from sticking to the deep frying pan?
@derobert yes, I read that. Maybe I wasn't clear. I am right now reviding my old opinion of "all deep frying has to be done at 190 C" and asking for further pointers about which temperature (in the presumably correct 163 to 191 interval) is the best for which food, starting with asking why 175 is best for tempura as stated in this answer.
May
14
comment How to keep battered (tempura) goods from sticking to the deep frying pan?
I was going to forego upvoting because I agree with everything you said except that your suggested temperature was way too low compared to what I believed to be correct. So I checked and, to my surprise, The Professional chef says "heat the cooking fat to the proper temperature (generally 325 to 375 F/163 to 191 C)". Do you have a good source on frying temperatures? Is 175 the correct one for tempura?