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Mar
31
awarded  Nice Answer
Mar
30
answered Creme Brulee did not set, can I fix?
Mar
29
asked Vegan ice cream has chalky texture
Mar
29
answered Why yoghurt comes out different every time?
Mar
28
comment Tempering chocolated fail!
It won't make a puddle, but a nice dark couverture will start smearing on fingers within a few seconds of holding.
Mar
28
answered Tempering chocolated fail!
Mar
28
answered Why did my ricotta cheese did not completely melt in the Alfredo?
Mar
28
comment Why does my milk bottle lid have two dates
Note that today's processed milk doesn't go sour or clump (unless you bought some special lightly procesed milk, but you'd probably know it if you did, it's a niche product). All it does upon spoilage is to get a slightly off taste, and it's more bitter than sour. So it may very well be spoiled, regardless of the printed date.
Mar
27
comment Julia Child - Mastering the Art of French Cooking - OK for Kosher?
I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it is about judging whether religious restrictions apply to a specific dish
Mar
27
comment What are the requirements for a dish to be kosher?
I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it is about religious rules
Mar
27
revised Can beef bourguignon be halal?
edited tags
Mar
27
comment Can beef bourguignon be halal?
Questions about religious restrictions cannot be answered here, it is up to a religious authority to define what is halal.
Mar
27
answered Which side of the baking paper should face up?
Mar
26
comment Tempering chocolated fail!
"as soon as it is touched it starts to melt" - that's how high quality coverture behaves, there is no way around it. Is there any other sign of it not being properly tempered? Is it grainy?
Mar
25
comment Temperature range for seasoning a carbon steel pan
OK, I see what you have in mind. The choice of oil still seems to be a duplicate, but the temperature is probably worth its own question. Although the existing questions already give hints for the temperature: cooking.stackexchange.com/questions/54642 says 500 (F?), cooking.stackexchange.com/questions/24520 "until the oil smokes". You can further fine tune my edit, of course, it's your question.
Mar
25
revised Temperature range for seasoning a carbon steel pan
Brought out the non-duplicate part
Mar
24
comment Temperature range for seasoning a carbon steel pan
I think they have a bit of a difference at how easy they are to season properly, but the methods are the same, you just have to be persistent until you have learned to do it right. We have a number of questions specifically about carbon steel too, and this answer is the first I've seen to suggest that a method cannot be applied to both.
Mar
24
comment Why use onions in cooking?
@Catija to be fair, people seldom make a strict differentiation between taste as in flavor and as in the tasting experience as a whole. It can be that the OP hates the texture only, but choose a sloppy expression.
Mar
24
comment Temperature range for seasoning a carbon steel pan
@Catija I have never known of any differences, and can't think of a reason for them to exist. But see also cooking.stackexchange.com/questions/56998, one says there is no difference and the other suggests a method which is typically used for iron too.
Mar
24
comment Temperature range for seasoning a carbon steel pan
Hi, all of your questions are duplicates. We also have cooking.stackexchange.com/questions/13555/… and cooking.stackexchange.com/questions/641/… to answer your points 2 and 3, and you can look through the rest of the tag as well. Carbon steel and cast iron use the same process.