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bio website janeylicious.com
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visits member for 3 years, 8 months
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Sep
18
comment Is Japanese kasutera the same foodstuff as Korean kastera?
Koreans like to use it as a generic name for a sponge cake with no fillings/toppings, perhaps. Castella is one of my favorite treats at Korean bakeries, and while they might have additional flavors (green tea, coffee, etc.) or different shapes or airier/denser cake... it's ultimately just like "barbecue" like you mention. I haven't seen that label being used for any other Western-style sweet cakes.
May
16
comment Hot tea to iced. Safe?
I'm actually a huge fan of cold brewed tea. I make it with a takeya pitcher and typically store it sideways in the fridge until it's ready. Teabag ratio depends on whether I want tea or tea-flavored water (which is also a nice change from herb/fruit-infused waters). I wonder if it would work for you: drinks.seriouseats.com/2012/07/…
May
6
comment What is the thin, colorless film that remains after making oatmeal?
Agreed, here's another question with a picture that's likely related.
Nov
3
comment First-Aid Kit for Kitchens
I guess I'm too used to my home kitchen where I have disposable gloves for cleaning and peppers (after many painful lessons!) :) The blue bandaids are worth mentioning though. If you can't find them specifically, basically anything but clear/flesh colored is a must. I've lost bandaids while working with dough at home and similar situations - metal detectable is nice and fancy for big scale but blue, the blue really sticks out right at you in many cases. Finger cots also come in high visibility colors too. I prefer gloves since it's a hell of a lot harder to lose by accident.
Nov
3
comment First-Aid Kit for Kitchens
I don't think aloe is a "first aid" thing though - it's more of a thing you can choose to put on after initial treatment (which is typically either cold water or call your local emergency #).
Nov
2
comment First-Aid Kit for Kitchens
I got a restaurant-themed first aid kit from Costco that contains basics (bandaids, gauze, cleaning stuff, pain relief, creams, booklet, equipment, etc.) but by far the only things that are actually used are blue bandaids (for visibility, and they're metal detectable too), neosporin, and finger cots/gloves. Cuts are probably the #1 injury by far, and if my employees get burned it's pretty much just cold water and gauze or doctor/911 time - no need for the burn cream that comes in those kits that you're not even supposed to use.
Oct
30
comment Frying Oil Reuse
They just make it easier to filter out oil and they get expensive depending on the amount of oil you plan to filter and how. You will get the same effect at home by using coffee filters or similar, using oil appropriate for your task at hand, and keeping different items to fry separated. There are also additives you can get to extend the life of your oil. Most of that advice is overkill for home use though. I don't even bother at my restaurant where we fry 100+lbs of fries alone daily - we clean the oil every 2-3 days and toss after 5.
Sep
21
comment Refrigerated lunchboxes turn soggy
There's a dish at my restaurant served with rice but it's not ordered enough to justify having a cooker warming up rice all the time. We cheat by putting a serving in a sandwich bag (with no zipper-top) and folding over the top, refrigerating a bunch of those bags, and microwaving on demand (while still bagged). The end product is just as good, I think. I think it's the steaming effect specifically that works wonders. The rice is refrigerated usually only 1 day but sometimes it's up to 3-4 (over the weekend when we're closed) and I don't notice much difference.
Sep
15
comment Can I use “spent” lemons (juiced) to preserve?
You can use the rinds of the juiced lemons and the juice from the zested lemons. If it turns out you don't have enough juice to cover the preserved lemons, you can also make candied lemon peel. I went through 200+ lemons in a week by making lemonade, preserved lemons, and candied peel with very little waste left.
Jul
29
comment Glass Food Processor
Robot Coupe and Hobart are some that come to mind (in the US) that I've seen with metal bowls, but of course we're talking commercial food processors that are easily $1k+ for basic starter models like SAJ14SAJ touched on. Not sure I've ever seen a home use one with glass or metal, only blenders. It might be easier to look for specifically BPA-free (or whatever fancies you) plastic.
Jul
5
comment Why does the custard in my lemon/lime bars always come out looking terrible and with bad texture?
Some things I'm wondering: (measured) temperature of oven, only baking until filling is set, accurate measurement of ingredients, waiting to cool? If I skip or screw up any of those steps my lemon/lime bars look a little off kind of like yours. Another thing might be the mixer for the filling - sometimes my bars come out foamy on top that way even at low speeds, so I'll sometimes cook the filling first on a stovetop (lemon curd to lemon bar, basically).
Jun
21
comment Do restaurants regularly disinfect baskets and trays?
I'm incredibly flattered by the idea of someone visiting my restaurant based on how clean it is :) I was so disturbed by the food safety training course I took before taking over the restaurant that I even go overboard where I can (like I'm pretty sure no health inspector is going to care about baskets used with wax paper being sanitized, but whatever). To nobody's surprise, I have a difficult time eating out because I know not everyone is like me.
Jun
21
comment Do restaurants regularly disinfect baskets and trays?
The edited quoted bit is part of it, here's another: "114113. Food shall only contact surfaces of equipment and utensils that are cleaned and sanitized."
Feb
15
comment What kind of cookies can be shaped?
I don't have any particular suggestions, but using general tips on keeping cookies from spreading (e.g. cold dough, replace butter with shortening) might be enough to let you use any kind of cookie for shaping. Here's some more tips: davidlebovitz.com/2006/12/why-do-cookies-spread
Feb
12
comment What happens to boiled pasta if you use too little water?
Actually, the Serious Eats article referenced in the accepted answer debunks most of your claims. The one about the starchier water ends up making no difference for cooking pasta, and proves to be even handier for use in thickening your sauce later.
Nov
9
comment What are the effective ways to wrap a pita?
I make pita wraps like my sushi rolls - thin lines of ingredients wrapped carefully with seaweed (in this case, pita bread) of appropriate and good quality. It may be the case you might be unevenly spreading out whatever you're putting in your wrap, or you may still be using too much for whatever your bread can handle.
Jul
6
comment Does kimchi go bad?
Most kimchi just doesn't get stored for as long as a year since it's typically gone by then, either by consuming or because it's actually gone bad (with mold and whatnot). That being said, there is a whole different kind of kimchi that is stored (without being actively consumed from) under controlled environments (like a fridge) even commercially for at least a year or two before it is eaten/sold. It's called 묵은지 (mook-eun-ji), quite literally "old kimchi". It's less sour and definitely more complex in flavor, and is most often used in soups. I personally love kimchi soup made with it :)
Jun
6
comment How do I replicate the unique crispiness of Korean fried chicken?
Well I haven't experimented with different batters, but the K(orean)FC I make seems to have a thinner batter overall. The key may be both the batter and the double frying. But I really love the double frying technique. Chicken not double fried definitely doesn't have the same texture.
Oct
8
comment How to prevent separation/layers in panna cotta?
@ElendilTheTall – Good point, I ended up using an envelope of Knox gelatin instead of leaf. Given that both layers were gelled the same, I didn't think that mattered so much.
Oct
8
comment How to prevent separation/layers in panna cotta?
This was my first time working with gelatin so I will definitely try that next time. Given that the two layers were gelled pretty well, just one obviously richer-tasting than the other, I wasn't sure if it was a gelatin problem or just cream floating to the top.