1,031 reputation
35
bio website
location San Francisco, CA
age
visits member for 3 years, 6 months
seen 2 days ago

I'm a software engineer and foodie living in San Francisco.


Mar
12
awarded  Yearling
Nov
2
answered Why did my chicken fingers not brown?
Oct
25
comment What to do with leftover crumb topping?
This is also a good use for leftover egg whites, if you have almonds or almond flour on hand (I make mine with huckleberries instead of rhubarb): orangette.blogspot.com/2006/05/celebrity-cake.html
Oct
25
comment What to do with leftover crumb topping?
This is pretty much what I do. Bake it, put it on ice cream or use it to garnish a fancy dessert plate. It's also good for anchoring a quenelle of ice cream in a plated dessert. One minor tweak: I'd stir the crumble halfway through baking so it's evenly cooked. Turn it over, and move the outside stuff towards the inside of the pan.
Oct
13
comment Making the most out of stock
For a single batch of veal stock, bones are sometimes used twice in separate liquid, which is later combined and reduced. I believe this is called "remouillage". See the recipe in the French Laundry cookbook as an example. For a poultry stock, if you're concerned about incomplete flavor extraction, I would recommend Michael Ruhlman's "oven" method, which is both easy and works well. (Cook water + bones in 180F oven over night, add the veggies &c and cook for an hour or so on the stovetop the next day.)
Oct
13
answered Separate cutting boards: Cooked vs Uncooked meat
Oct
13
comment Sushi rolls opening up
For inside out, I cover the whole sheet with rice, flip it, put the toppings on, and roll. (I also cut the sheets of nori in half before making sushi.) And I usually put a sheet of plastic wrap over the bamboo mat to help keep the rice from sticking to the mat.
Oct
11
answered Sushi rolls opening up
Oct
11
answered Halving Spice Mixtures
Sep
30
comment What's the most cost effective way to make chicken bone broth?
You can often get chicken (and turkey) backs and necks from many butchers, which are good for stock. They tend to be leftover from breaking down chicken for people who buy parts. I also like to use chicken feet in my stocks for extra gelatin.
Sep
29
awarded  Nice Answer
Sep
24
answered What is the best way to store stock in the freezer?
Sep
13
answered secret ingredient in a restaurant bolognese
Sep
7
answered I am trying to cook Butta no Kakuni or Japanese pork belly but it's tough
Jul
26
comment How accurate are kitchen scales?
If you need accuracy without spending a lot of money, search for "American Weigh Scales" on Amazon. You'll find a 0.1 g scale that goes to 1kg and a 0.01g scale that goes to 100g. Both for under $10 at the moment. This is good for measuring things like xanthan gum. For coffee, I'd guess an extra half gram wouldn't hurt anything.
Jun
28
comment Need help identifying 2 ingredients in homemade chicken biryani
FWIW, I've never seen that pink/red behavior in Indian food, but my experience is limited to what is available in San Francisco. If you'd like to add some red, you could consider adding some chunks of ripe tomatoes, perhaps tossed in a little ground cumin and coriander.
Jun
27
answered Need help identifying 2 ingredients in homemade chicken biryani
Jun
14
comment What type of frying pan does not warp?
@Aaronut - I've managed to warp a 2 qt All-Clad sauce pan. It was one of those instances where you know something is wrong, but you follow the recipe anyway. I stuck a hot pan of sugar in a bath of ice-water, now the center sticks up a little bit more than the rest of the base.
Jun
14
comment How do I know if food left at room temperature is still safe to eat?
It's also a good idea to keep a thermometer in your fridge. They typically don't have built-in temperature readings, and you may be inadvertently endangering yourself and your guests. The appropriate temperatures are discussed here: cooking.stackexchange.com/questions/12013/…
Jun
13
comment Is it safe to eat freshwater fish raw?
Also, because it lives part of its life in freshwater, Salmon must be frozen for a period of time (which depends on temperature) before being consumed raw. Usually it is flash-frozen, so the texture is not affected.