33,296 reputation
448123
bio website
location Maryland
age
visits member for 4 years, 5 months
seen 17 mins ago

American foodie (non-professional) of mixed italian / sicilian / basque / argentinean / british heritage; family from US northeast, but has lived in US mid-atlantic, US south, and western europe.


6h
awarded  Nice Answer
11h
comment Egg yolk sizes changed over the years?
@Erica : I've never had good luck with cookie presses unless I was using the recipes that specifically came with it. I suspect that the different sizes in the holes for the plates requires slightly different consistency batter, and not all cookie presses are created equal. (I was using other people's presses, and didn't have an opportunity to measure to confirm my suspicions)
11h
comment Should iodized salt be avoided when salting meat?
it's commonly called 'curing salt' or 'pink salt' (and sometimes 'prague powder'). It's generally added in small amounts to the cure, not a replacement for the salt entirely. There are two different types (#1 and #2), so if you have a recipe that calls for it, use the right one and don't substitute.
14h
comment How to make wet fries?
Other than the sesame oil, it actually sounds similar to sauces you might find for patatas bravas
15h
comment Fully cooked ham left out for 10 hours, is it still safe to eat?
The item that you're claiming is a duplicate doesn't touch on the fact that his is a ham ... ie, heavily salted. It may not have been a full cure for preservation's sake (eg, a country ham), but the salt will reduce the chance of microbes breeding.
16h
answered What is the best way to store fruit in bulk to make smoothies?
1d
comment What is the history of the standard sheet (bun) pan?
Most of the 'bun pan' patents are for making specific shaped buns ... except for this one from 1935 with indents to line up the doughballs, which also has similar proportions to modern pans ... most of the earlier patents had square or 2:1 aspect pans.
1d
comment What is the history of the standard sheet (bun) pan?
Just to note -- I sent e-mail to the Bundy Baking Museum, asking if they had any info. Food Timeline had a good suggestion about doing a patent search. There's a 1921 patent for a sheet pan without corners, a 1934 patent for adjustable size sheet pans and a 1955 patent for stackable sheet pans (which look to have similar proportions to modern ones)
1d
comment How to mix cream to increase its fat percentage?
related : cooking.stackexchange.com/q/29395/67
1d
comment How can I thicken whipping cream?
This is an interesting approach ... I suspect that there might be other dried items that could be used that wouldn't have the acid issues that Jay mentioned ... maybe rice, although that would transfer some starch in the process. (and you couldn't scrape it off as easily)
1d
comment Desalinating dried/smoked fish
If they're smoked, the smoke acts a preservative, so they might not be salted quite so heavily ... but odds are, there'd still be a fair bit of salt (just maybe not quite as much). If it's sold packaged in the US, it should have the sodium content listed, but you'll want to make sure to normalize the portion sizes for comparison.
1d
comment creme brulee without torch
Interesting ... I would think that if people are concerned with the hot sugar cooking the custard too much, you could put down a layer of granulated sugar first to help insulate it from the hot sugar. (although then the top would be thicker).
2d
comment What should I look for in a cookie jar?
If it's a dry (or moist due to oil, not water) cookie, I wouldn't think that glass would be a problem. Typically moist things in glass containers are a problem as the water evaporates, then condenses on the inside of the jar.
2d
comment How to bake crushed peppermint into cake?
... but if you sieve it, save the powder to sprinkle on after frosting them.
2d
comment Whole eggs versus folding in egg whites
It'll work in a 1-2-3-4 cake, as you've creamed the butter & sugar together, as you would with a pound cake. If the cake only gets its lift from the egg whites (eg, chiffon, angel food, a soufflé), whole eggs won't work. (and yes, I know it's not angel food, as they mention that it also calls for egg yolks).
2d
comment What flavors complement pistachio (pudding specifically)?
@briantist : if you're using a cream whipper that takes nitrous cartridges, you can typically put in commercially ground spices ... do not use home ground spices, as the size may be large enough to block the nozzle up. You really don't want to have to follow this advice if you can help it. For manual whipping, I don't know if it'd be better to infuse the cream, chill, then whip; mix the spice in before whipping; or mix the spice after (or partially through whipping). You might want to ask this as a separate question so it gets more visibility.
2d
comment What flavors complement pistachio (pudding specifically)?
I was thinking citrus as well, but was thinking lemon. (possibly top the pie w/ a layer of lemon curd before the whipped cream, or mix some lemon zest in with the whipped cream)
2d
comment Can someone identify this food?
@Jolenealaska : I've had the Korean version ... and they're ... interesting. Might be a bit of an aquired taste / texture. It wasn't bad, it just wasn't what I was expecting. (sort of like when you're expecting cola, and you get root beer ... even if you like root beer, it just seems wrong)
2d
comment Should iodized salt be avoided when salting meat?
If we're talking about brining/pickling, this might cover the specific question better : extension.psu.edu/food/preservation/faq/… . "... it is not recommended for canning recipes because the calcium silicate may cause clouding or settle to the bottom of jar. Furthermore, the iodide may discolor some foods."
2d
comment Substituting oil in baking?
It sure would be nice if people would say why they're downvoting people, especially a new person. If you disagree, say why you disagree, so that others can decide if they're willing to take the change. eg, extra virgin olive oil tends to be more expensive, so maybe you're miserly. Or you don't agree on the doesn't give a different flavor (which might be true in the US, as we tend to have olive oil cut w/ cheaper oils)