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location Maryland
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visits member for 4 years, 6 months
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American foodie (non-professional) of mixed italian / sicilian / basque / argentinean / british heritage; family from US northeast, but has lived in US mid-atlantic, US south, and western europe.


10h
answered Keeping rice paper spring rolls moist
10h
comment Vegan breakfast recipe
It's possible that Mark Bittman would have useful recipes, due to his 'VB6' diet (Vegan Before 6pm, in which he has a vegan breakfast & lunch) See amazon.com/VB6-Cookbook-Recipes-Delicious-Flexitarian/dp/…. Personally, I'll often make home fries (potatos + onions + bell pepper ... basically a hash without the eggs or meat)
11h
comment Reverse engineer the Perfect Japanese Omelet
It looks to be to be closer to soft-scrambled eggs, that you roll up towards the end to form a bit of a skin. (and then rotate like an aebelskiver to get the skin on all sizes) They both look to be using much more egg than you'd expect in that size pan than you'd use for an omelet.
11h
comment Why or why not beat an egg before adding?
If it calls for beating 'until lightened in color', they're looking for denaturing the eggs. (I'm not sure where 'until frothy' stands on the denatured spectrum.
11h
revised Translating cooking terms between US / UK / AU / CA / NZ
entree ; added 'cultural-difference' tag.
2d
comment Baked beans still firm after soaking and hours of cooking
I've taken to buying dried beans at a latin market, vs. a regular grocery store. The higher turn-over means that I have less of a chance of old bean problems, and they're significantly cheaper.
2d
comment How long can cooked food be safely stored at room/warm temperature?
Potted meat might be stored at British room temperature, but American room temp tends to be much warmer. I know there are more answers on here about preservation via fat, but they tend to be voted down because of potential food safety concerns. If done correctly, you're pasteurizing the meat, and then sealing it from exposure. See also cooking.stackexchange.com/q/8070/67
2d
comment how long can I leave cooked meat out on the counter before it goes bad?
Actively 'going bad' is different from the safety 'has a chance at being bad' ... but there's lots of different factors in play. (temperature, how the meat's been handled, lighting, if the meat's wrapped or not, etc.) I'm guessing that no one would be able to pin down all of the variables and have tested each point experimentally enough times for statistical validity. (if I'm wrong, I'd love to see what the results are).
Jan
22
comment What are alternative gelling agents to gelatine? And what are their properties?
It seems that the FCI primer has been moved. I found something that seems to be it at cookingissues.com/index.html%3Fp=1247.html
Jan
22
comment Baked beans still firm after soaking and hours of cooking
If you have a slow cooker, I'd leave them in there all day (or overnight) on low, and see if they soften up. You could also try a low oven (200F to 250F, as low as yours will go) and just leaving them in there for a similar amount of time.
Jan
22
comment Baked beans still firm after soaking and hours of cooking
Canned beans are already cooked ... dried beans can take an hour or more to cook, multiple hours if they're cooked in an acidic environment or if they're particularly old beans.
Jan
22
comment Unpeeled garlic cloves in French / Belgian cooking?
I've seen it called for when you're cooking over high heat ... the idea is that it helps to protect the garlic from burning. When used this way, you'll then remove them before you start adding so much that you can't easily pick them back out.
Jan
21
comment How to make cheesecake less tangy
They might've made it was mascarpone or ricotta. (the texture of ricotta cheesecake can be noticable, though)
Jan
20
answered Catering event for 1st time. How should I prepare?
Jan
20
answered Standardized symbols for marking food allergies / warnings?
Jan
20
comment Any ideas for a Guyanese menu
I'd agree with Richard ten Brink -- if they have a specific cuisine they want, you should talk to them; there might be localization so that their concept of 'guyanese' might not be the same as someone from other parts of the country.
Jan
20
comment Why does my corn flour dough feel like wet sand?
UK 'corn flour' is corn starch. In the US masa harina is sometimes labeled as 'corn flour'
Jan
20
comment Better ways to prepare bean burrito paste?
Um ... you're getting a bit too enthusiastic here. The idea is one question per page. You've added comments with another dozen or so new questions. My advice would be to look online for a recipe that seems within your skill level and equipment (eg, if you don't have a food processor, look for one that calls for a potato masher) If it were me, I'd make the beans in bulk but pain, then add the hot peppers when using it. After doing that, ask some follow up questions but be more specific than "didn't turn out quite right". (what flavor/texture/etc did you get vs. expect)
Jan
20
comment Better ways to prepare bean burrito paste?
Simmering is hot, but just below boiling. You might have a few bubbles, but nowhere near the level of boiling. As for adding the flavorings twice, it's because some flavors change as you cook them (and garlic and onions change significantly)... so you get the flavors that soak into the beans, but then you get the fresher flavors when you add them the second time.
Jan
20
comment Better ways to prepare bean burrito paste?
Typically you don't boil them ... you simmer them until they're soft. And many recipes call for adding some flavorings while simmering (eg, some garlic & onion) and possibly again towards the end of cooking. You then mash them before you fry them.