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American foodie (non-professional) of mixed italian / sicilian / basque / argentinean / british heritage; family from US northeast, but has lived in US mid-atlantic, US south, and western europe.


Aug
5
answered Why is it necessary to preheat an oven?
Aug
5
comment Pork shoulder put in broken oven for 10 hours, safe to eat?
This might be a duplicate, but it looks like we have found a new reason for pre-heating an oven.
Aug
4
comment How is “nacho sliced” jalapeño different from regular sliced?
and I've seen jalapeños that were sliced into long strips, rather than rounds ... I would consider the rounds to be 'nacho sliced', but not the strips ... but I have no idea if that's what the difference is in this case.
Aug
4
comment How is “nacho sliced” jalapeño different from regular sliced?
@PhilFrost : because you typically think of jalapeños as having heat. It's either a strange breed, or they've done some non-typical processing to it to remove the heat.
Aug
4
answered Recommendations: Food with Minimal Stovetop Time, No Oven Available
Aug
4
comment Recommendations: Food with Minimal Stovetop Time, No Oven Available
@Jolenealaska : it might not be an electric stove; I've been in towns where the norm is having a bottle of gas (not what type ... I think the bottle was orange) under the stove, as they didn't even have gas lines.
Aug
4
comment Recommendations: Food with Minimal Stovetop Time, No Oven Available
Pasta has significantly less cooking time than rice. (5-12 min vs. 20-30).
Aug
4
comment Can the broth from a low country boil be used for anything else?
For #3 -- taste before you add more salt; most boils will have a fair amount of salt to start with. I have no idea what's in the 'seafood boil packets', but old bay does have salt in it (160mg per 1/4tsp)
Aug
3
comment active dry yeast vs instant yeast
oops ...and as YosemiteMark noticed, it called for fresh (aka cake yeast) ... see cooking.stackexchange.com/q/4119/67 and cooking.stackexchange.com/q/44957/67
Aug
3
comment active dry yeast vs instant yeast
related : cooking.stackexchange.com/q/9355/67 (note that although they asked about rapid rise, one of the answers talks about the differences between instance and rapid rise, as well)
Aug
3
answered Misto nozzle leaks
Aug
3
comment Keeping bananas fresh for longer
They're used commercially because they pack things in crates & shipping containers ... they don't have the freedom to just let there be lots of air exchange.
Aug
2
comment Keeping bananas fresh for longer
There's a very small 'optimimum' period, in my opinion, but you should be able to stretch them out to at least a 5 day window. And if you buy bunches that are at different stages (I generally try to get the most green + the most yellow bunch), you can have bananas over an even longer period.
Aug
1
answered Maintaining crispy fried potatoes while cooking with onions and peppers
Aug
1
comment Maintaining crispy fried potatoes while cooking with onions and peppers
I assume this is a followup to : cooking.stackexchange.com/q/6667/67
Aug
1
comment Can anyone tell me what kind of squash this is?
Although I wouldn't think this would be off-topic here, you might also try asking on the gardening site : gardening.stackexchange.com
Jul
31
comment Recipe Filing System
Asking about how to search PDFs & Word files would be better asked on a different site ... but there are other question on here about recommendations for recipe management software. (I'm not going to link to them all, because other people voted to close one that had 30+ upvotes and had been around for ~3 years.)
Jul
31
comment Do I have to cook salame
@jsanc623 : actually, think of it as salted, spiced pork belly -- as classic bacon is smoked, there are plenty of curing methods that may make bacon that is safe to eat raw. (although I wouldn't do that with your general supermarket bacon). See cooking.stackexchange.com/a/13962/67
Jul
31
answered Do I have to cook salame
Jul
30
comment What is the Chinese celery and cabbage appetizer called and how is it made?
It might be a form of kimchi, or at least related to it. Not all kimchi is hot, fermented or heavily sour. (and yes, I know, kimchi is Korean, not Chinese ... but the concept of preseving foods aren't limited to a single country)