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American foodie (non-professional) of mixed italian / sicilian / basque / argentinean / british heritage; family from US northeast, but has lived in US mid-atlantic, US south, and western europe.


Sep
12
reviewed Leave Open What cooking techniques depend on controlled temperature between 100 and 120 degrees celsius?
Sep
12
reviewed Leave Open Do tinned foods go off (stale)?
Sep
12
comment Can I make fried chicken without a deep frier?
@user3786992 : electric shouldn't be a problem. You can use non-cast iron, but you need to make sure you have a deep enough pan to work with. If your pans have short sides, you might want to go with option C (look up recipes for 'chicken cutlets')
Sep
11
asked Saving old chocolate
Sep
11
answered The recipe for chess pie includes cornmeal and vinegar-why?
Sep
11
comment Milk temperature for white sauce
Agreed ... see cooking.stackexchange.com/a/4421/67 for more details.
Sep
11
comment Do tinned foods go off (stale)?
Although canned food decades old can be safe ... if the can's puffed out, it's a sign of an anaerobic digestion, and may not be safe. Also if it smells off or looks really strange, trust your body's warning systems. That being said, if held at reasonable temperatures, I wouldn't even blink at most stuff held for 2x their recommended shelf life. But pickle slices get all limp and nasty if they're a decade past.
Sep
11
answered Do tinned foods go off (stale)?
Sep
10
comment Is it safe to drink?
@Niall : if the question had been for 'hot milk', then yes ... but I'm guessing that Ching's correct in the assessment of 'warm milk' being in the danger zone the whole time. You can try to offset this problem by intentionally heating the milk past 60°C/140°F in a less insulating container so it cools down to the desired temperature at a planned time, but the milk isn't in the danger zone for as long.
Sep
10
comment How to add more toppings to frozen pizza?
This question will likely be closed, as there simply isn't one correct answer. (see cooking.stackexchange.com/help/dont-ask ). Of course, that actually supposes that there's only one correct answer to other questions on here, which would be incorrect for a large number of them.
Sep
10
answered Cheesier Cheese Sauce?
Sep
9
comment Cheesier Cheese Sauce?
It's generally sold as 'cheese powder'. I don't know if I'd trust anything calling itself 'cheez powder'. (I would think it'd be like the difference between 'chocolate' and 'chocolatey coating')
Sep
9
comment Cheesier Cheese Sauce?
Aged cheeses are actually a problem for cheese sauces -- although they have more flavor, they end up making the sauce gritty because of the crystals that form in aged cheeses.
Sep
9
comment What is the real difference in lo mein, chow mein, mei fun, and chop suey?
This might not help w/ the final dishes, but Serious Eats recently had a post on shopping for different types of asian noodles : seriouseats.com/2014/08/asian-noodle-shopping-guide.html
Sep
9
answered Brined chicken - too salty
Sep
9
comment Can I sterilize homemade mustard jars in the oven?
If you're selling it at a market, you need to ask your local health department what their acceptable procedures are. Advice from strangers on a website won't save you if something goes wrong.
Sep
8
comment Why is fish not considered as meat?
@Niall : They even couch their answer ... "The Vegetarian Society defines a vegetarian as: ...", which is effectively saying that there's more than one possible definition. They define vegan as a subset of vegetarianism, but I've heard arguments that cruelty-free meat (ie, roadkill from wild animals) is acceptable to some vegans, as they'd prefer it to not be wasted.
Sep
8
comment Why is fish not considered as meat?
There are a lot of different takes on 'vegetarian'. You're assuming that your definition holds true for all people, but it doesn't. We've since coined terms for the various types of vegetarians (eg, pescetarian in this case, ovo-lacto for those who eat eggs & dairy), but the general category of 'non-meat eaters' is considered by most people to be 'vegetarian', even though it's a rather fuzzy grouping. (the ovo-lacto-pescetarian in the office next door even calls herself a 'vegetarian')
Sep
8
comment Why is fish not considered as meat?
Well before Christianity, Jews considered fish to be 'not meat' as well. (to keep Kosher, the two can't be eaten together)
Sep
8
comment Why is fish not considered as meat?
As it's a cultural thing, I'm guessing that the issue might be an issue with translation. (where groups has words that we've translated to 'meat', but whose definition was mammal & poultry (and possibly reptile or amphibian), and didn't include fish.