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Sep
29
comment How to remove the excessive saltiness from gammon?
@PrestonFitzgerald : thin slices are fine, either in a sandwich, as a topping for or wrapped around something. Even on its own it's fine in small amounts ... but in large volumes, it's basically a salt lick.
Sep
29
answered How to remove the excessive saltiness from gammon?
Sep
29
comment What is 'adequate' refrigerated space for a single person
I don't know that this question is answerable in its present form -- how many meals are you preparing yourself vs. ordering out? Where do you live? (different cultures have different needs for refrigeration). Do you cook every meal fresh, or do 'once a week' type cooking?
Sep
28
comment Quick flavour for fresh popcorn
@Jefromi : I use my pump oil sprayer to give a light coating of oil, then I can toss in the popcorn salt, then toss the whole bowl to coat. It's actually difficult to over-salt this way, as the extra salt will just fall to the bottom of the bowl. related : cooking.stackexchange.com/a/27924/67
Sep
28
comment What are different methods of preserving chillies?
@PeterTaylor : the advantage of scissors in this case is that you can hold it by the stem, avoiding much of the problems. (but still wash your hands afterwards ... my stepfather once gave me some, and I didn't know they were as strong as habaneros)
Sep
28
comment What is levure equivalant in America?
Other considerations -- how long do you let it sit before baking? Yeast would require time to work. Also, brownies (at least, in the U.S.) aren't actually leavened.
Sep
28
comment What is levure equivalant in America?
I would've assumed baking powder or baking soda, except for the 'packet of' qualifier. Do they sell other leavening agents in France in packets, or just yeast?
Sep
28
comment How can I tell if homemade ginger syrup has gone bad?
sugar can ferment ... so bubbles or the jar puffing out would be signs of trouble.
Sep
27
comment Can I boil water to temperature lower than 100 Celsius / 212 Fahrenheit to make a tea?
You can boil water at 70°C ... it just requires being about 9450 meters (31,000 feet) above sea level, if I'm doing my math right. Of course, Mt. Everest is only 8,848 meters, so you'd probably need a hot air balloon. 5000m should give you a boiling point closer to 83°C.
Sep
27
answered What are different methods of preserving chillies?
Sep
26
comment How would I produce (stable) foamy bechamel sauce?
Beware of cream whippers. If you added fresh grated nutmeg or fresh cracked pepper to the bechamel, you'll need to strain it first. Commercially ground nutmeg is typically fine enough pass through the whipper, but most grind sizes of pepper may clog the whipper. See cooking.stackexchange.com/q/34996/67
Sep
26
revised Cooking terminology: ingredient preparation vocabulary
added lots more terms
Sep
26
revised Cooking terminology: ingredient preparation vocabulary
fixed 'packed' ... added a bunch of terms
Sep
25
comment Cooking terminology: ingredient preparation vocabulary
This might be easier to manage if you broke it into categories .. eg, those that involved removing outer coatings, and then differentiate between shucking / shelling / peeling / paring / etc. Other categories from your list are cutting, crushing, cooking, mixing, separating/cleaning. You'd then also see terms you were mising (eg, riced, roasted, blend, separate, julienne, ground, pull, simmer, fry, etc.) ... but then we get into issues like broil vs. grill
Sep
25
comment Do you need to break up a large dough ball into smaller balls for optimal proving?
Air doesn't need to reach the base ... it's actually better to go in one large batch for the first proof, as you don't have as much surface to dry out (because air can't reach it).
Sep
25
comment Sausage exploded and looks foamy
@GdD : that's what I thought when I first read the writeup ... and then I realized w/ how CGIs work, any shell out on a webserver may be vulnerable ... see perlmonks.org/?node_id=1101954
Sep
25
comment Sausage exploded and looks foamy
@Jefromi : maybe after I finish auditing all of my servers. #$@^& bash exploit.
Sep
25
comment Sausage exploded and looks foamy
Yes, it's just from protein-laden moisture, agitated as the moisture evaporates and bubbles.
Sep
25
comment Sausage exploded and looks foamy
If you didn't pierce the skin of the sausage, yes, they can explode. If the foam you mention looks like the scum that you get from cooking down bones for for stock, yes, that's normal too.
Sep
25
comment Does cooking one month expired canned goods render it edible?
@CareyGregory : okay, modified.