302 reputation
2620
bio website n/a
location Napier, New Zealand
age 38
visits member for 3 years, 1 month
seen Jun 6 at 6:33

Database driven web application programmer, with interests in regular expressions, Bitcoin, sustainability, and ethics.

Currently interested in new work opportunities!


Dec
7
comment How cooking temperature and oven set up can help prevent cakes from becoming too brown or burnt on top?
@Jolenealaska, it's electric, and modern (but not an expensive model).
Nov
18
comment Minimum temperature for slow roasting almonds
Thanks Chris! Some great information there! I will update my question with the results at a later date.
Nov
17
comment Unnecessary kitchen gadgets: a reference
+1 for mentioning the enormous amount of space it takes up...
Nov
13
comment Minimum temperature for slow roasting almonds
@bonCodigo I want to make them into almond butter initially, but if the result is worthwhile I may roast them as a snack too. One recipe I'm keen to try for that uses garlic, rosemary, olive oil and salt.
Oct
5
comment Safety of glues in wooden chopping boards
@TFD, thanks, that's just the kind of information I'm looking for. How do you know that? Is there more detail available online somewhere?
Oct
5
comment Safety of glues in wooden chopping boards
@CareyGregory, not necessarily; if the leaching is caused by heat, the drying cycle would likely reach the hottest temperatures.
Oct
4
comment Safety of glues in wooden chopping boards
I'm actually in New Zealand, so the mention of GluLam happens to be particularly relevant, though I've never heard of it before. NZ is a small country, and we tend to have much more lax regulations than elsewhere, so even if we had regulations it's likely there would be no enforcement. It's likely that the majority of chopping boards on the market here are from China. It's probably safe to say that if there are no standards anywhere else, then Chinese manufacturers won't be paying much attention to the issue.
Oct
4
comment Safety of glues in wooden chopping boards
@CareyGregory, I question it too (esp since it's from a school of vetinary medicine!), but to date I haven't found anything better. Also, plastics are known to leach plasticizer chemicals when heated, so they might not be particularly safe when cleaned for a long period in a very hot dishwasher, even if they won't harbour bacteria in high levels when cleaned that way.
Oct
4
comment Safety of glues in wooden chopping boards
The whole reason I want to use wooden boards is to protect from contamination... the science of it is documented here: faculty.vetmed.ucdavis.edu/faculty/docliver/cuttingboard.html
Oct
4
comment Safety of glues in wooden chopping boards
You probably wouldn't know if you had gotten sick from glue in a cutting board. Besides, that's not a good measure; it's entirely possible that the more toxic glues are carcinogenic in small doses but won't upset your tummy.
Oct
3
comment Cutting boards: What are some general tips on purchasing and using a cutting board?
This would be better split into individual questions. I'd vote it closed, but I don't have enough rep yet.
Aug
24
comment When should I use convection when baking?
Related question: cooking.stackexchange.com/questions/19435/fan-bake-vs-bake
Jul
1
comment Is lavender used to season food?
Related question: cooking.stackexchange.com/q/3299/6767
Jun
8
comment Why is my Pizza Dough always too sticky to knead?
You might find that just leaving it on the bench for the same amount of time also works?
May
12
comment How can I reliably bake pizza with no temperature control or pizza stone?
I think one of the design features of a pizza stone is that it's porous so steam can escape through the bottom (which should allow for a crispier base), and another is that it's reasonably thick so has substantial thermal mass (doesn't cool down too quickly when you stick a pizza on it). This would mean a glazed ceramic tile, or a thin tile, would give less benefit. Disclaimer: I have no interest in the selling of pizza stones!
May
11
comment Why does my bread keep 'blowing out'?
I don't think the "yeast goes into overdrive". Instead, I think the yeast quickly dies and the CO2 bubbles that have already been produced by the yeast expand greatly as they are heated.
May
10
comment Theoretical: why there's no gradient of doneness in bread?
@Ray, I doubt pumpernickel gets up to 150C in the crumb, as it would get far too dry, so therefore the browning of the crumb that occurs wouldn't be caused by the Maillard reaction. Can anyone confirm?
May
10
comment Theoretical: why there's no gradient of doneness in bread?
Steam doesn't evaporate. Steam, by definition, is water that has already evaporated. However, it does make sense that steam would prevent a crust from forming, which is the opposite of what I've read right up until this moment!
May
10
comment Is it important to warm the flour before making bread?
To bring some physics theory to the table: temp rise from kneading will depend on how vigorously you knead (or mix) and for how long, but all the time while you're kneading the dough will be tending towards room temperature (or slightly below, unless humidity is very high, thanks to evaporation of the moisture in the dough) at a rate proportional to the difference between room temp and the dough temp. In a cold dry room, the dough will lose heat the fastest. If you have cold flour, adding warmer water should make up for it, as long as you don't kill the yeast (stay well under 50C/122F)