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Jan
6
revised What chemical(s) gives molasses its flavor so that it is used as an ingredient?
added optional plural suffix
Jan
6
comment What chemical(s) gives molasses its flavor so that it is used as an ingredient?
So your answer is that the answer is too complex? :) I tried to find a published mass spectrum of cane molasses but all I could get was for some kind of boiled pine tree sap. I could understand if there's no economical way to make a zero-calorie substitute but I'm still curious to know what the chemicals are. You say that different kinds of sugars have different flavors. That's an interesting assertion that I'd like to test. What's the easiest way to get pure fructose, glucose, and sucrose?
Jan
6
comment What chemical(s) gives molasses its flavor so that it is used as an ingredient?
And if you added sucrolose to that water, wouldn't it approximate the taste of molasses? :) I think it would probably be a powder though.
Jan
5
comment What chemical(s) gives molasses its flavor so that it is used as an ingredient?
Yes I learned all that before asking the question. I'm asking what is the chemical or at least more specific version of "concentration of the juice from the sugar cane" (minus the sugar). Why can't we extract ALL the sugar from the concentration and just be left with the flavor to which we can add a sugar substitute?
Jan
5
asked What chemical(s) gives molasses its flavor so that it is used as an ingredient?