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seen Oct 13 '11 at 22:41

Love to cook, love to eat!


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Aug
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comment What types of food are safe for short-term room-temperature storage?
This makes a lot of sense. I'm probably not the person to launch it, though. :)
Aug
23
comment What types of food are safe for short-term room-temperature storage?
Incidentally, I believe a large-ish table with notes is the right way to answer this question. For example, storage onions and potatoes are measured in months.
Aug
23
comment What types of food are safe for short-term room-temperature storage?
Perhaps cooking.stackexchange.com/questions/2642/… would be a good spot? Disclosure: I wrote the question, long ago.
Aug
23
comment I left fully cooked lasagna out all night
Update, I didn't realize Aaronut and Satanicpuppy are in an extended debate on this site re: food-safety questions. I'll bow out now.
Aug
23
comment I left fully cooked lasagna out all night
I haven't had the pleasure of reading Myhrvold's research, sadly. I will say I agree generally with @satanicpuppy's perspective that I would eat reheated lasagna under the terms described above. I agree with Michael and Aaronut that it would not be suitable for guests and certainly not at a professional food establishment.
Aug
22
comment I left fully cooked lasagna out all night
See my comment on your answer. Staph and E-Coli would need to be re-introduced to be a significant risk based on the parameters of the question.
Aug
22
comment I left fully cooked lasagna out all night
@michael I strongly disagree with your perspective here. Staph will not be present unless someone sneezed on the lasagna post-cooking. E coli will have been killed during initial cooking, and will therefore have already released all the toxins they can. If it was safe the first time, and not sneezed on or re-infected with E-coli, it will continue to be safe if reheated.
Aug
22
comment I left fully cooked lasagna out all night
I have thoroughly reviewed the link you post, and stand by my general advice. Which bacteria listed on that link do you believe are at risk of growing here, (and note, at a rate which will cause significant toxins being left out 12 hours?) If the lasagna was safe to eat at first (and in this case, it seems to be, since the author has posted this question), there is nothing on that list that poses a health risk if the lasagna has been re-heated the following day. Food safety is important, but there's no point in spreading fear needlessly.