2 added 189 characters in body
source | link

If you're working manually with a heavily hydrated dough, its just going to require a lot of flour if you're going to knead manually. Sometimes that's even anticipated in the recipe - that extra flour will be incorporated into the recipe during manual kneading. If that's the route you want to go, it just takes lots of flour and patience. Putting the dough fridge for a couple of hours will also help, it will fully hydrate the flour and generally make it a bit easier to work with.

That said - its also possible you could be using a different flour (even brand matters!) than your recipe is intending for and you're over hydrating that recipe. The proportions in recipe seem on par (at least the flour to water ratio) for a pizza dough - at least the ones I do (I checked in BBA just to double check and its about the same as well). If its too slack to work with at all, try reducing the water a bit. It may take a little experimenting, but once you figure out what works for the taste/texture you want and the ingredients you use - you'll get a 'feel' for the dough. Just by looking at and handling the dough, you'll immediately know if you've got the right amount of water. Its takes a bit of time to develop that - but not much.

Additionally, if you find you like the texture of that recipe, but the extra hydration makes it difficult to knead, then just don't. If its that hydrated, just give it time like a 'No Knead Bread' and the dough will form the gluten for you. Reduce the yeast in the recipe and give it time. Googling 'No Knead Bread' will elaborate, but generally its just letting it sit for an extending period on the counter (or a bit longer in the fridge).

If you're working manually with a heavily hydrated dough, its just going to require a lot of flour if you're going to knead manually. Sometimes that's even anticipated in the recipe - that extra flour will be incorporated into the recipe during manual kneading. If that's the route you want to go, it just takes lots of flour and patience. Putting the dough fridge for a couple of hours will also help, it will fully hydrate the flour and generally make it a bit easier to work with.

That said - its also possible you could be using a different flour (even brand matters!) than your recipe is intending for and you're over hydrating that recipe. If its too slack to work with at all, try reducing the water a bit. It may take a little experimenting, but once you figure out what works for the taste/texture you want and the ingredients you use - you'll get a 'feel' for the dough. Just by looking at and handling the dough, you'll immediately know if you've got the right amount of water. Its takes a bit of time to develop that - but not much.

Additionally, if you find you like the texture of that recipe, but the extra hydration makes it difficult to knead, then just don't. If its that hydrated, just give it time like a 'No Knead Bread' and the dough will form the gluten for you. Reduce the yeast in the recipe and give it time. Googling 'No Knead Bread' will elaborate, but generally its just letting it sit for an extending period on the counter (or a bit longer in the fridge).

If you're working manually with a heavily hydrated dough, its just going to require a lot of flour if you're going to knead manually. Sometimes that's even anticipated in the recipe - that extra flour will be incorporated into the recipe during manual kneading. If that's the route you want to go, it just takes lots of flour and patience. Putting the dough fridge for a couple of hours will also help, it will fully hydrate the flour and generally make it a bit easier to work with.

That said - its also possible you could be using a different flour (even brand matters!) than your recipe is intending for and you're over hydrating that recipe. The proportions in recipe seem on par (at least the flour to water ratio) for a pizza dough - at least the ones I do (I checked in BBA just to double check and its about the same as well). If its too slack to work with at all, try reducing the water a bit. It may take a little experimenting, but once you figure out what works for the taste/texture you want and the ingredients you use - you'll get a 'feel' for the dough. Just by looking at and handling the dough, you'll immediately know if you've got the right amount of water. Its takes a bit of time to develop that - but not much.

Additionally, if you find you like the texture of that recipe, but the extra hydration makes it difficult to knead, then just don't. If its that hydrated, just give it time like a 'No Knead Bread' and the dough will form the gluten for you. Reduce the yeast in the recipe and give it time. Googling 'No Knead Bread' will elaborate, but generally its just letting it sit for an extending period on the counter (or a bit longer in the fridge).

1
source | link

If you're working manually with a heavily hydrated dough, its just going to require a lot of flour if you're going to knead manually. Sometimes that's even anticipated in the recipe - that extra flour will be incorporated into the recipe during manual kneading. If that's the route you want to go, it just takes lots of flour and patience. Putting the dough fridge for a couple of hours will also help, it will fully hydrate the flour and generally make it a bit easier to work with.

That said - its also possible you could be using a different flour (even brand matters!) than your recipe is intending for and you're over hydrating that recipe. If its too slack to work with at all, try reducing the water a bit. It may take a little experimenting, but once you figure out what works for the taste/texture you want and the ingredients you use - you'll get a 'feel' for the dough. Just by looking at and handling the dough, you'll immediately know if you've got the right amount of water. Its takes a bit of time to develop that - but not much.

Additionally, if you find you like the texture of that recipe, but the extra hydration makes it difficult to knead, then just don't. If its that hydrated, just give it time like a 'No Knead Bread' and the dough will form the gluten for you. Reduce the yeast in the recipe and give it time. Googling 'No Knead Bread' will elaborate, but generally its just letting it sit for an extending period on the counter (or a bit longer in the fridge).