3 Edited for clarity. Grammar fixes.
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Resting meat is essential, speciallyespecially for steaks such as rib-eye or fillet. Around 5-10 minutes is ideal, this will give you a more tender, juicy steak. It will also prevent the juice from gushing onto the plate when cut into.

One choice is to simply rest in a warm oven, no more than 50c though (60c is roughly medium-rare).

Another choice (which requires a little more work) which provides the best results in my opinion is resting in a beurre monte (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beurre_monte). This is essentially a melted butter solution which you can warm to ~40c and rest the meat in for a good 10 minutes.

Resting meat is essential, specially for steaks such as rib-eye or fillet. Around 5-10 minutes is ideal, this will give you a more tender, juicy steak. It will also prevent the juice from gushing onto the plate when cut into.

One choice is to simply rest in a warm oven, no more than 50c though (60c is roughly medium-rare).

Another choice (which requires a little more work) which provides the best results in my opinion is resting in a beurre monte (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beurre_monte). This is essentially a melted butter solution which you can warm to ~40c and rest the meat in for a good 10 minutes.

Resting meat is essential, especially for steaks such as rib-eye or fillet. Around 5-10 minutes is ideal, this will give you a more tender, juicy steak. It will also prevent the juice from gushing onto the plate when cut into.

One choice is to simply rest in a warm oven, no more than 50c though (60c is roughly medium-rare).

Another choice (which requires a little more work) which provides the best results in my opinion is resting in a beurre monte (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beurre_monte). This is essentially a melted butter solution which you can warm to ~40c and rest the meat in for a good 10 minutes.

2 the way to suggest another answer is wrong is by commenting on or downvoting that answer. Or even both.
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First of all, ignore John Koning, he obviously doesn't know what he's talking about...

Resting meat is essential, specially for steaks such as rib-eye or fillet. Around 5-10 minutes is ideal, this will give you a more tender, juicy steak. It will also prevent the juice from gushing onto the plate when cut into.

One choice is to simply rest in a warm oven, no more than 50c though (60c is roughly medium-rare).

Another choice (which requires a little more work) which provides the best results in my opinion is resting in a beurre monte (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beurre_monte). This is essentially a melted butter solution which you can warm to ~40c and rest the meat in for a good 10 minutes.

First of all, ignore John Koning, he obviously doesn't know what he's talking about...

Resting meat is essential, specially for steaks such as rib-eye or fillet. Around 5-10 minutes is ideal, this will give you a more tender, juicy steak. It will also prevent the juice from gushing onto the plate when cut into.

One choice is to simply rest in a warm oven, no more than 50c though (60c is roughly medium-rare).

Another choice (which requires a little more work) which provides the best results in my opinion is resting in a beurre monte (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beurre_monte). This is essentially a melted butter solution which you can warm to ~40c and rest the meat in for a good 10 minutes.

Resting meat is essential, specially for steaks such as rib-eye or fillet. Around 5-10 minutes is ideal, this will give you a more tender, juicy steak. It will also prevent the juice from gushing onto the plate when cut into.

One choice is to simply rest in a warm oven, no more than 50c though (60c is roughly medium-rare).

Another choice (which requires a little more work) which provides the best results in my opinion is resting in a beurre monte (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beurre_monte). This is essentially a melted butter solution which you can warm to ~40c and rest the meat in for a good 10 minutes.

1
source | link

First of all, ignore John Koning, he obviously doesn't know what he's talking about...

Resting meat is essential, specially for steaks such as rib-eye or fillet. Around 5-10 minutes is ideal, this will give you a more tender, juicy steak. It will also prevent the juice from gushing onto the plate when cut into.

One choice is to simply rest in a warm oven, no more than 50c though (60c is roughly medium-rare).

Another choice (which requires a little more work) which provides the best results in my opinion is resting in a beurre monte (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beurre_monte). This is essentially a melted butter solution which you can warm to ~40c and rest the meat in for a good 10 minutes.