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If you're not that comfortable with sharpening tools, I recommend that you stick to stainless steel knives and stay away from carbon steel. Henkels, Wusthof, Sabatier, Victrinox, Shun, etc., are going to be about equivalent here. Regardless of what country in which the company is headquartered, most of these knives are actually made in China.

Global knives are special; I strongly recommend that you not consider buying them based on sharpening alone. Their steel handles, flexibility and razor sharpness are not for everyone. Make sure you try them and like them first. Global knives will, indeed, require less frequent steeling or sharpening.

Most other Japanese knives are carbon steel and single-sided, and require special care. Again, not recommended for someone not interested in home sharpening.

If you get a good sharpening steel (Global knives will require a ceramic rod), and "steel" your knives ever other use or so, you won't need to have them sharpened more than once every couple of years unless you're doing a lot of chopping bones. This assumes that you're using a sensible cutting board (wood or soft plastic). So taking them out for sharpening once every couple years isn't a big deal.

When you do take your knives out for sharpening, make sure you get someone who knows what they're doing. A lot of knife-sharpening places use low-grit belt grinders or stone wheels which take far too much steel off the knife and ruin them. I certainly wouldn't buy knives which are too expensive if you're going to let someone else sharpen them.

If you're not that comfortable with sharpening tools, I recommend that you stick to stainless steel knives and stay away from carbon steel. Henkels, Wusthof, Sabatier, Victrinox, Shun, etc., are going to be about equivalent here. Regardless of what country in which the company is headquartered, most of these knives are actually made in China.

Global knives are special; I strongly recommend that you not consider buying them based on sharpening alone. Their steel handles, flexibility and razor sharpness are not for everyone. Make sure you try them and like them first.

Most other Japanese knives are carbon steel and single-sided, and require special care. Again, not recommended for someone not interested in home sharpening.

If you get a good sharpening steel (Global knives will require a ceramic rod), and "steel" your knives ever other use or so, you won't need to have them sharpened more than once every couple of years unless you're doing a lot of chopping bones. This assumes that you're using a sensible cutting board (wood or soft plastic). So taking them out for sharpening once every couple years isn't a big deal.

When you do take your knives out for sharpening, make sure you get someone who knows what they're doing. A lot of knife-sharpening places use low-grit belt grinders or stone wheels which take far too much steel off the knife and ruin them. I certainly wouldn't buy knives which are too expensive if you're going to let someone else sharpen them.

If you're not that comfortable with sharpening tools, I recommend that you stick to stainless steel knives and stay away from carbon steel. Henkels, Wusthof, Sabatier, Victrinox, Shun, etc., are going to be about equivalent here. Regardless of what country in which the company is headquartered, most of these knives are actually made in China.

Global knives are special; I strongly recommend that you not consider buying them based on sharpening alone. Their steel handles, flexibility and razor sharpness are not for everyone. Make sure you try them and like them first. Global knives will, indeed, require less frequent steeling or sharpening.

Most other Japanese knives are carbon steel and single-sided, and require special care. Again, not recommended for someone not interested in home sharpening.

If you get a good sharpening steel (Global knives will require a ceramic rod), and "steel" your knives ever other use or so, you won't need to have them sharpened more than once every couple of years unless you're doing a lot of chopping bones. This assumes that you're using a sensible cutting board (wood or soft plastic). So taking them out for sharpening once every couple years isn't a big deal.

When you do take your knives out for sharpening, make sure you get someone who knows what they're doing. A lot of knife-sharpening places use low-grit belt grinders or stone wheels which take far too much steel off the knife and ruin them. I certainly wouldn't buy knives which are too expensive if you're going to let someone else sharpen them.

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If you're not that comfortable with sharpening tools, I recommend that you stick to stainless steel knives and stay away from carbon steel. Henkels, Wusthof, Sabatier, Victrinox, Shun, etc., are going to be about equivalent here. Regardless of what country in which the company is headquartered, most of these knives are actually made in China.

Global knives are special; I strongly recommend that you not consider buying them based on sharpening alone. Their steel handles, flexibility and razor sharpness are not for everyone. Make sure you try them and like them first.

Most other Japanese knives are carbon steel and single-sided, and require special care. Again, not recommended for someone not interested in home sharpening.

If you get a good sharpening steel (Global knives will require a ceramic rod), and "steel" your knives ever other use or so, you won't need to have them sharpened more than once every couple of years unless you're doing a lot of chopping bones. This assumes that you're using a sensible cutting board (wood or soft plastic). So taking them out for sharpening once every couple years isn't a big deal.

When you do take your knives out for sharpening, make sure you get someone who knows what they're doing. A lot of knife-sharpening places use low-grit belt grinders or stone wheels which take far too much steel off the knife and ruin them. I certainly wouldn't buy knives which are too expensive if you're going to let someone else sharpen them.