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The folks at Cook's Illustrated had this to say to a similar quesiton:

We advise against cooking with salted butter for three reasons. First, the amount of salt in salted butter varies from brand to brand—it can range from 1.25 percent to 1.75 percent of the total weight, making it impossible to offer conversion amounts that will work with all brands. Second, because salt masks some of the flavor nuances found in butter, salted butter tastes different from unsalted butter. Finally, salted butter almost always contains more water than unsalted butter. The water in butter ranges from 10 to 18 percent. In baking, butter with a low water content is preferred, since excess water can interfere with the development of gluten. In fact, when we used the same brand of both salted and unsalted butter to make brownies and drop biscuits, tasters noticed that samples made with salted butter were a little mushy and pasty; they preferred the texture of baked goods made with unsalted butter.

However, if it's all you have, I wouldn't worry too much. Just reduce the salt called for in your recipe by 1.7 grams or 1/3 of a teaspoon (table salt) for each 8 oz.tablespoons (stick) of salted butter you use. This is the average amount of salt in a stick of salted butter.

The folks at Cook's Illustrated had this to say to a similar quesiton:

We advise against cooking with salted butter for three reasons. First, the amount of salt in salted butter varies from brand to brand—it can range from 1.25 percent to 1.75 percent of the total weight, making it impossible to offer conversion amounts that will work with all brands. Second, because salt masks some of the flavor nuances found in butter, salted butter tastes different from unsalted butter. Finally, salted butter almost always contains more water than unsalted butter. The water in butter ranges from 10 to 18 percent. In baking, butter with a low water content is preferred, since excess water can interfere with the development of gluten. In fact, when we used the same brand of both salted and unsalted butter to make brownies and drop biscuits, tasters noticed that samples made with salted butter were a little mushy and pasty; they preferred the texture of baked goods made with unsalted butter.

However, if it's all you have, I wouldn't worry too much. Just reduce the salt called for in your recipe by 1.7 grams or 1/3 of a teaspoon (table salt) for each 8 oz. (stick) of salted butter you use. This is the average amount of salt in a stick of salted butter.

The folks at Cook's Illustrated had this to say to a similar quesiton:

We advise against cooking with salted butter for three reasons. First, the amount of salt in salted butter varies from brand to brand—it can range from 1.25 percent to 1.75 percent of the total weight, making it impossible to offer conversion amounts that will work with all brands. Second, because salt masks some of the flavor nuances found in butter, salted butter tastes different from unsalted butter. Finally, salted butter almost always contains more water than unsalted butter. The water in butter ranges from 10 to 18 percent. In baking, butter with a low water content is preferred, since excess water can interfere with the development of gluten. In fact, when we used the same brand of both salted and unsalted butter to make brownies and drop biscuits, tasters noticed that samples made with salted butter were a little mushy and pasty; they preferred the texture of baked goods made with unsalted butter.

However, if it's all you have, I wouldn't worry too much. Just reduce the salt called for in your recipe by 1.7 grams or 1/3 of a teaspoon (table salt) for each 8 tablespoons (stick) of salted butter you use. This is the average amount of salt in a stick of salted butter.

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source | link

The folks at Cook's Illustrated had this to say to a similar quesiton:

We advise against cooking with salted butter for three reasons. First, the amount of salt in salted butter varies from brand to brand—it can range from 1.25 percent to 1.75 percent of the total weight, making it impossible to offer conversion amounts that will work with all brands. Second, because salt masks some of the flavor nuances found in butter, salted butter tastes different from unsalted butter. Finally, salted butter almost always contains more water than unsalted butter. The water in butter ranges from 10 to 18 percent. In baking, butter with a low water content is preferred, since excess water can interfere with the development of gluten. In fact, when we used the same brand of both salted and unsalted butter to make brownies and drop biscuits, tasters noticed that samples made with salted butter were a little mushy and pasty; they preferred the texture of baked goods made with unsalted butter.

However, if it's all you have, I wouldn't worry too much. Just reduce the salt called for in your recipe by 1.7 grams or 1/3 of a teaspoon (table salt) for each 8 oz. (stick) of salted butter you use. This is the average amount of salt in a stick of salted butter.