2 Removed factually inaccurate statement
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Strictly speaking most gumbo recipes I am familiar with rely on the use of a roux as the primary thickening agent. Sure the okra contributes somewhat but in my experience using a darkened roux is what is called for.

Please keep in mind that the more you cook the roux the less thickening power it has so you need to use a little more. Also the darkness comes from browning the butter first, before adding the flour.

Strictly speaking most gumbo recipes I am familiar with rely on the use of a roux as the primary thickening agent. Sure the okra contributes somewhat but in my experience using a darkened roux is what is called for.

Please keep in mind that the more you cook the roux the less thickening power it has so you need to use a little more. Also the darkness comes from browning the butter first, before adding the flour.

Strictly speaking most gumbo recipes I am familiar with rely on the use of a roux as the primary thickening agent. Sure the okra contributes somewhat but in my experience using a darkened roux is what is called for.

Please keep in mind that the more you cook the roux the less thickening power it has so you need to use a little more.

1
source | link

Strictly speaking most gumbo recipes I am familiar with rely on the use of a roux as the primary thickening agent. Sure the okra contributes somewhat but in my experience using a darkened roux is what is called for.

Please keep in mind that the more you cook the roux the less thickening power it has so you need to use a little more. Also the darkness comes from browning the butter first, before adding the flour.