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Your standard Oster style blender will do fine. That particular blender has a great advantage in that replacement parts and "upgrade" parts are super easy to find. Oster I still use an Oster blender that belonged to my grandmother. Frequent blending of boiling hot liquids will wear out the o-ring, but o-rings are cheap and easy to replace. You can get a perfectly good old Oster at a thrift store for a song.

Read this too: http://cooking.stackexchange.com/questions/5712/how-can-i-safely-use-a-blender-with-hot-liquids?rq=1How can I safely use a blender with hot liquids?

Here's good info too from About.com: "Blend hot liquids carefully, starting on lowest speed; leave lid cap off for steam to escape and fill the jar only half full, allowing more room for expansion. You may need to use a hot pad while holding down the lid during operation."

Knowing in advance that you want to blend hot liquids, you might want to choose a glass "heat shock proof" blender jar instead of plastic. Plastic should remain structurally sound, but it will get hazy.

Your standard Oster style blender will do fine. That particular blender has a great advantage in that replacement parts and "upgrade" parts are super easy to find. Oster I still use an Oster blender that belonged to my grandmother. Frequent blending of boiling hot liquids will wear out the o-ring, but o-rings are cheap and easy to replace. You can get a perfectly good old Oster at a thrift store for a song.

Read this too: http://cooking.stackexchange.com/questions/5712/how-can-i-safely-use-a-blender-with-hot-liquids?rq=1

Here's good info too from About.com: "Blend hot liquids carefully, starting on lowest speed; leave lid cap off for steam to escape and fill the jar only half full, allowing more room for expansion. You may need to use a hot pad while holding down the lid during operation."

Knowing in advance that you want to blend hot liquids, you might want to choose a glass "heat shock proof" blender jar instead of plastic. Plastic should remain structurally sound, but it will get hazy.

Your standard Oster style blender will do fine. That particular blender has a great advantage in that replacement parts and "upgrade" parts are super easy to find. Oster I still use an Oster blender that belonged to my grandmother. Frequent blending of boiling hot liquids will wear out the o-ring, but o-rings are cheap and easy to replace. You can get a perfectly good old Oster at a thrift store for a song.

Read this too: How can I safely use a blender with hot liquids?

Here's good info too from About.com: "Blend hot liquids carefully, starting on lowest speed; leave lid cap off for steam to escape and fill the jar only half full, allowing more room for expansion. You may need to use a hot pad while holding down the lid during operation."

Knowing in advance that you want to blend hot liquids, you might want to choose a glass "heat shock proof" blender jar instead of plastic. Plastic should remain structurally sound, but it will get hazy.

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Your standard Oster style blender will do fine. That particular blender has a great advantage in that replacement parts and "upgrade" parts are super easy to find. Oster I still use an Oster blender that belonged to my grandmother. Frequent blending of boiling hot liquids will wear out the o-ring, but o-rings are cheap and easy to replace. You can get a perfectly good old Oster at a thrift store for a song.

Read this too: http://cooking.stackexchange.com/questions/5712/how-can-i-safely-use-a-blender-with-hot-liquids?rq=1

Here's good info too from About.com: "Blend hot liquids carefully, starting on lowest speed; leave lid cap off for steam to escape and fill the jar only half full, allowing more room for expansion. You may need to use a hot pad while holding down the lid during operation."

Knowing in advance that you want to blend hot liquids, you might want to choose a glass "heat shock proof" blender jar instead of plastic. Plastic willshould remain structurally sound, but it will get hazy.

Your standard Oster style blender will do fine. That particular blender has a great advantage in that replacement parts and "upgrade" parts are super easy to find. Oster I still use an Oster blender that belonged to my grandmother. Frequent blending of boiling hot liquids will wear out the o-ring, but o-rings are cheap and easy to replace. You can get a perfectly good old Oster at a thrift store for a song.

Read this too: http://cooking.stackexchange.com/questions/5712/how-can-i-safely-use-a-blender-with-hot-liquids?rq=1

Here's good info too from About.com: "Blend hot liquids carefully, starting on lowest speed; leave lid cap off for steam to escape and fill the jar only half full, allowing more room for expansion. You may need to use a hot pad while holding down the lid during operation."

Knowing in advance that you want to blend hot liquids, you might want to choose a glass blender jar instead of plastic. Plastic will remain structurally sound, but it will get hazy.

Your standard Oster style blender will do fine. That particular blender has a great advantage in that replacement parts and "upgrade" parts are super easy to find. Oster I still use an Oster blender that belonged to my grandmother. Frequent blending of boiling hot liquids will wear out the o-ring, but o-rings are cheap and easy to replace. You can get a perfectly good old Oster at a thrift store for a song.

Read this too: http://cooking.stackexchange.com/questions/5712/how-can-i-safely-use-a-blender-with-hot-liquids?rq=1

Here's good info too from About.com: "Blend hot liquids carefully, starting on lowest speed; leave lid cap off for steam to escape and fill the jar only half full, allowing more room for expansion. You may need to use a hot pad while holding down the lid during operation."

Knowing in advance that you want to blend hot liquids, you might want to choose a glass "heat shock proof" blender jar instead of plastic. Plastic should remain structurally sound, but it will get hazy.

3 added 63 characters in body
source | link

Your standard Oster style blender will do fine. That particular blender has a great advantage in that replacement parts and "upgrade" parts are super easy to find. Oster I still use an Oster blender that belonged to my grandmother. Frequent blending of boiling hot liquids will wear out the o-ring, but o-rings are cheap and easy to replace. You can get a perfectly good old Oster at a thrift store for a song.

Read this too: http://cooking.stackexchange.com/questions/5712/how-can-i-safely-use-a-blender-with-hot-liquids?rq=1

Here's good info too from About.com: "Blend hot liquids carefully, starting on lowest speed; leave lid cap off for steam to escape and fill the jar only half full, allowing more room for expansion. You may need to use a hot pad while holding down the lid during operation."

Knowing in advance that you want to blend hot liquids, you might want to choose a glass blender jar instead of plastic. Plastic will remain structurally sound, but it will get hazy.

Your standard Oster style blender will do fine. That particular blender has a great advantage in that replacement parts and "upgrade" parts are super easy to find. Oster I still use an Oster blender that belonged to my grandmother. Frequent blending of boiling hot liquids will wear out the o-ring, but o-rings are cheap and easy to replace. You can get a perfectly good old Oster at a thrift store for a song.

Read this too: http://cooking.stackexchange.com/questions/5712/how-can-i-safely-use-a-blender-with-hot-liquids?rq=1

Here's good info too from About.com: "Blend hot liquids carefully, starting on lowest speed; leave lid cap off for steam to escape and fill the jar only half full, allowing more room for expansion. You may need to use a hot pad while holding down the lid during operation."

Knowing in advance that you want to blend hot liquids, you might want to choose a glass blender jar instead of plastic.

Your standard Oster style blender will do fine. That particular blender has a great advantage in that replacement parts and "upgrade" parts are super easy to find. Oster I still use an Oster blender that belonged to my grandmother. Frequent blending of boiling hot liquids will wear out the o-ring, but o-rings are cheap and easy to replace. You can get a perfectly good old Oster at a thrift store for a song.

Read this too: http://cooking.stackexchange.com/questions/5712/how-can-i-safely-use-a-blender-with-hot-liquids?rq=1

Here's good info too from About.com: "Blend hot liquids carefully, starting on lowest speed; leave lid cap off for steam to escape and fill the jar only half full, allowing more room for expansion. You may need to use a hot pad while holding down the lid during operation."

Knowing in advance that you want to blend hot liquids, you might want to choose a glass blender jar instead of plastic. Plastic will remain structurally sound, but it will get hazy.

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