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Sorry, I disagree with rumtscho. This is great advice for anyone from 15 to 95. The more well maintained your equipment is, the safer it is to use. He also gives great advice on the type of knives to buy and the best advice is to only let people you trust use them. I keep a couple of well maintained cheapies for my guests to use so I never have to gasp and grab my beauties from someone bent on destroying them. Since I am 75 I believe that I can say that there is no one style that is meant for “elderly” people. There are companies that make knives for different impairments and these should be investigated but there are as many different levels of skill in senior citizens as there are senior citizens and to try and say that one size fits all just will not work. I am using the same style of knives that I did 30 years ago. In fact, because I take care of them like Optionparty does his, they are the same knives. They are sharp so I do less work and I cut on a good surface so they don’t slip and cut me. By all means, ergonomic knives are great for those who need them but most people need education on care and use of their knives more.

@rumtscho I do have one knife that could be considered ergonomic. I don’t call it ergonomic; I just call it “The Perfect Knife”. It is by Geisser of Germany and is called Coltello D'arte I. I found an image of it at this site. http://www.oqvist.se/se/articleimage.php?id=18420&image=8474686&fullwidth=0&fullheight=0 I have had it 25 years so I don’t know if they still make it but it is wonderful. I have the small chef’s knife and it is as if it is made for my hand alone. The balance is great and it is just the right weight. It has one fault in that it needs constant homing but I usually do that anyway. For someone looking for a well shaped handle, this fits the bill.

Sorry, I disagree with rumtscho. This is great advice for anyone from 15 to 95. The more well maintained your equipment is, the safer it is to use. He also gives great advice on the type of knives to buy and the best advice is to only let people you trust use them. I keep a couple of well maintained cheapies for my guests to use so I never have to gasp and grab my beauties from someone bent on destroying them. Since I am 75 I believe that I can say that there is no one style that is meant for “elderly” people. There are companies that make knives for different impairments and these should be investigated but there are as many different levels of skill in senior citizens as there are senior citizens and to try and say that one size fits all just will not work. I am using the same style of knives that I did 30 years ago. In fact, because I take care of them like Optionparty does his, they are the same knives. They are sharp so I do less work and I cut on a good surface so they don’t slip and cut me. By all means, ergonomic knives are great for those who need them but most people need education on care and use of their knives more.

Sorry, I disagree with rumtscho. This is great advice for anyone from 15 to 95. The more well maintained your equipment is, the safer it is to use. He also gives great advice on the type of knives to buy and the best advice is to only let people you trust use them. I keep a couple of well maintained cheapies for my guests to use so I never have to gasp and grab my beauties from someone bent on destroying them. Since I am 75 I believe that I can say that there is no one style that is meant for “elderly” people. There are companies that make knives for different impairments and these should be investigated but there are as many different levels of skill in senior citizens as there are senior citizens and to try and say that one size fits all just will not work. I am using the same style of knives that I did 30 years ago. In fact, because I take care of them like Optionparty does his, they are the same knives. They are sharp so I do less work and I cut on a good surface so they don’t slip and cut me. By all means, ergonomic knives are great for those who need them but most people need education on care and use of their knives more.

@rumtscho I do have one knife that could be considered ergonomic. I don’t call it ergonomic; I just call it “The Perfect Knife”. It is by Geisser of Germany and is called Coltello D'arte I. I found an image of it at this site. http://www.oqvist.se/se/articleimage.php?id=18420&image=8474686&fullwidth=0&fullheight=0 I have had it 25 years so I don’t know if they still make it but it is wonderful. I have the small chef’s knife and it is as if it is made for my hand alone. The balance is great and it is just the right weight. It has one fault in that it needs constant homing but I usually do that anyway. For someone looking for a well shaped handle, this fits the bill.

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Sorry, I disagree with rumtscho. This is great advice for anyone from 15 to 95. The more well maintained your equipment is, the safer it is to use. He also gives great advice on the type of knives to buy and the best advice is to only let people you trust use them. I keep a couple of well maintained cheapies for my guests to use so I never have to gasp and grab my beauties from someone bent on destroying them. Since I am 75 I believe that I can say that there is no one style that is meant for “elderly” people. There are companies that make knives for different impairments and these should be investigated but there are as many different levels of skill in senior citizens as there are senior citizens and to try and say that one size fits all just will not work. I am using the same style of knives that I did 30 years ago. In fact, because I take care of them like Optionparty does his, they are the same knives. They are sharp so I do less work and I cut on a good surface so they don’t slip and cut me. By all means, ergonomic knives are great for those who need them but most people need education on care and use of their knives more.