4 deleted 2 characters in body
source | link

One thing that will often help is to allow the dough to rest for a while (15 minutes or longer) after mixing and before kneading (cover the dough with plasic wrap). That resting period starts autolysis, the actual absorption of the water by the flour and the beginning of gluten development. That will make the dough less sticky and easier to work with without adding a flour, which as you say, can throw off the hydration of the dough if you use too much. Your concerns about using too much flour to keep the dough from sticking while kneading are well founded.

One thing that will often help is to allow the dough to rest for a while (15 minutes or longer) after mixing and before kneading (cover the dough with plasic wrap). That resting period starts autolysis, the actual absorption of the water by the flour and the beginning of gluten development. That will make the dough less sticky and easier to work with without adding a flour, which as you say, can throw off the hydration of the dough if you use too much. Your concerns about using too much flour to keep the dough from sticking while kneading are well founded.

One thing that will often help is to allow the dough to rest for a while (15 minutes or longer) after mixing and before kneading (cover the dough with plasic wrap). That resting period starts autolysis, the actual absorption of the water by the flour and the beginning of gluten development. That will make the dough less sticky and easier to work with without adding flour, which as you say, can throw off the hydration of the dough if you use too much. Your concerns about using too much flour to keep the dough from sticking while kneading are well founded.

3 added 13 characters in body
source | link

One thing that will often help is to allow the dough to rest for a while (15 minutes or longer) after mixing and before kneading (cover the dough with plasic wrap). That resting period starts autolysis, the actual absorption of the water by the flour and the beginning of gluten development. That will make the dough less sticky and easier to work with without adding a lot of flour, which as you say, can throw off the hydration of the dough if you use too much. Your concerns about using too much flour to keep the dough from sticking while kneading are well founded.

One thing that will often help is to allow the dough to rest for a while (15 minutes or longer) after mixing and before kneading (cover the dough with plasic wrap). That resting period starts autolysis, the actual absorption of the water by the flour and the beginning of gluten development. That will make the dough less sticky and easier to work with without adding a lot of flour, which as you say, can throw off the hydration of the dough. Your concerns about using too much flour to keep the dough from sticking while kneading are well founded.

One thing that will often help is to allow the dough to rest for a while (15 minutes or longer) after mixing and before kneading (cover the dough with plasic wrap). That resting period starts autolysis, the actual absorption of the water by the flour and the beginning of gluten development. That will make the dough less sticky and easier to work with without adding a flour, which as you say, can throw off the hydration of the dough if you use too much. Your concerns about using too much flour to keep the dough from sticking while kneading are well founded.

2 added 9 characters in body
source | link

One thing that will often help is to allow the dough to rest for a while (15 minutes or longer) after mixing and before kneading (cover the dough with plasic wrap). That resting period starts autolysis, the actual absorption of the water by the flour and the beginning of gluten development. That will make the dough less sticky and easier to work with without adding a lot of flour, which as you say, can throw off the hydration of the dough. Your concerns about using too much flour to keep the dough from sticking while kneading are well founded.

One thing that will often help is to allow the dough to rest for a while (15 minutes or longer) after mixing and before kneading (cover the dough with plasic wrap). That resting period starts autolysis, the actual absorption of the water by the flour and the beginning of gluten development. That will make the dough less sticky and easier to work with without adding flour, which as you say, can throw off the hydration of the dough. Your concerns about using too much flour to keep the dough from sticking while kneading are well founded.

One thing that will often help is to allow the dough to rest for a while (15 minutes or longer) after mixing and before kneading (cover the dough with plasic wrap). That resting period starts autolysis, the actual absorption of the water by the flour and the beginning of gluten development. That will make the dough less sticky and easier to work with without adding a lot of flour, which as you say, can throw off the hydration of the dough. Your concerns about using too much flour to keep the dough from sticking while kneading are well founded.

1
source | link