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You can cook rice like pasta, boiling in excess water until done then draining. But there are a couple main reasons not to:

  • You'll wash away a lot of the starch. Especially for starchier varieties (short and medium grain), this may not be a good thing - you'll end up with distinct grains, not nice fluffy, slightly sticky rice.
  • It can be a pain to drain properly. You probably have a colander for pasta, with holes large enough that rice will fall through. If you use a metal sieve, it can be prone to getting little bits stuck in it, making it hard to clean.
  • If you accidentally overcook it, it'll be awful, soft and mushy. If on the other hand you cookstart with the right amount of water, and overcook it, it'll just stick to the pot on the bottom, leaving most of it still good on top.

So if you're having trouble with traditional methods, you can try boiling, or try a pilaf (I'll add an example latersomething like this, but you can make it plain if you want), which will be less prone to sticking and overcooking. Or else you can just get a rice cooker and get it right every time!

But it's really not that bad, and I'm sure you'll figure it out after a few tries. Measuring the ratio correctly is easy enough (though you may want to adjust it if you find it's consistently not quite to your tastes), and beyond that you just have to be careful not to let it cook too hot and stick.

Also, for your specific experience, the half closed lid might have the problem. That will let a lot of steam escape, so you won't have enough water left to cook it properly. And adding more at the end is never as good as having it right to begin with, since it takes time for the new water to come up to temperature, and the rice has time to get soggy on the outside without cooking thoroughly. The method I've always known is to simmer with a closed lid - just make sure you turn it down as soon as it's hot enough so it doesn't boil over or stick.

You can cook rice like pasta, boiling in excess water until done then draining. But there are a couple main reasons not to:

  • You'll wash away a lot of the starch. Especially for starchier varieties (short and medium grain), this may not be a good thing - you'll end up with distinct grains, not nice slightly sticky rice.
  • It can be a pain to drain properly. You probably have a colander for pasta, with holes large enough that rice will fall through. If you use a metal sieve, it can be prone to getting little bits stuck in it, making it hard to clean.
  • If you accidentally overcook it, it'll be awful, soft and mushy. If on the other hand you cook with the right amount of water, it'll just stick to the pot on the bottom, leaving most of it still good on top.

So if you're having trouble with traditional methods, you can try boiling, or try a pilaf (I'll add an example later), which will be less prone to sticking and overcooking. Or else you can just get a rice cooker and get it right every time!

But it's really not that bad, and I'm sure you'll figure it out after a few tries. Measuring the ratio correctly is easy enough (though you may want to adjust it if you find it's consistently not quite to your tastes), and beyond that you just have to be careful not to let it cook too hot and stick.

Also, for your specific experience, the half closed lid might have the problem. That will let a lot of steam escape, so you won't have enough water left to cook it properly. And adding more at the end is never as good as having it right to begin with, since it takes time for the new water to come up to temperature, and the rice has time to get soggy on the outside without cooking thoroughly. The method I've always known is to simmer with a closed lid - just make sure you turn it down as soon as it's hot enough so it doesn't boil over or stick.

You can cook rice like pasta, boiling in excess water until done then draining. But there are a couple main reasons not to:

  • You'll wash away a lot of the starch. Especially for starchier varieties (short and medium grain), this may not be a good thing - you'll end up with distinct grains, not nice fluffy, slightly sticky rice.
  • It can be a pain to drain properly. You probably have a colander for pasta, with holes large enough that rice will fall through. If you use a metal sieve, it can be prone to getting little bits stuck in it, making it hard to clean.
  • If you accidentally overcook it, it'll be awful, soft and mushy. If on the other hand you start with the right amount of water, and overcook it, it'll just stick to the pot on the bottom, leaving most of it still good on top.

So if you're having trouble with traditional methods, you can try boiling, or try a pilaf (something like this, but you can make it plain if you want), which will be less prone to sticking and overcooking. Or else you can just get a rice cooker and get it right every time!

But it's really not that bad, and I'm sure you'll figure it out after a few tries. Measuring the ratio correctly is easy enough (though you may want to adjust it if you find it's consistently not quite to your tastes), and beyond that you just have to be careful not to let it cook too hot and stick.

Also, for your specific experience, the half closed lid might have the problem. That will let a lot of steam escape, so you won't have enough water left to cook it properly. And adding more at the end is never as good as having it right to begin with, since it takes time for the new water to come up to temperature, and the rice has time to get soggy on the outside without cooking thoroughly. The method I've always known is to simmer with a closed lid - just make sure you turn it down as soon as it's hot enough so it doesn't boil over or stick.

2 added 553 characters in body
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You can cook rice like pasta, boiling in excess water until done then draining. But there are a couple main reasons not to:

  • You'll wash away a lot of the starch. Especially for starchier varieties (short and medium grain), this may not be a good thing - you'll end up with distinct grains, not nice slightly sticky rice.
  • It can be a pain to drain properly. You probably have a colander for pasta, with holes large enough that rice will fall through. If you use a metal sieve, it can be prone to getting little bits stuck in it, making it hard to clean.
  • If you accidentally overcook it, it'll be awful, soft and mushy. If on the other hand you cook with the right amount of water, it'll just stick to the pot on the bottom, leaving most of it still good on top.

So if you're having trouble with traditional methods, you can try boiling, or try a pilaf (I'll add an example later), which will be less prone to sticking and overcooking. Or else you can just get a rice cooker and get it right every time!

But it's really not that bad, and I'm sure you'll figure it out after a few tries. Measuring the ratio correctly is easy enough (though you may want to adjust it if you find it's consistently not quite to your tastes), and beyond that you just have to be careful not to let it cook too hot and stick.

Also, for your specific experience, the half closed lid might have the problem. That will let a lot of steam escape, so you won't have enough water left to cook it properly. And adding more at the end is never as good as having it right to begin with, since it takes time for the new water to come up to temperature, and the rice has time to get soggy on the outside without cooking thoroughly. The method I've always known is to simmer with a closed lid - just make sure you turn it down as soon as it's hot enough so it doesn't boil over or stick.

You can cook rice like pasta, boiling in excess water until done then draining. But there are a couple main reasons not to:

  • You'll wash away a lot of the starch. Especially for starchier varieties (short and medium grain), this may not be a good thing - you'll end up with distinct grains, not nice slightly sticky rice.
  • It can be a pain to drain properly. You probably have a colander for pasta, with holes large enough that rice will fall through. If you use a metal sieve, it can be prone to getting little bits stuck in it, making it hard to clean.
  • If you accidentally overcook it, it'll be awful, soft and mushy. If on the other hand you cook with the right amount of water, it'll just stick to the pot on the bottom, leaving most of it still good on top.

So if you're having trouble with traditional methods, you can try boiling, or try a pilaf (I'll add an example later), which will be less prone to sticking and overcooking. Or else you can just get a rice cooker and get it right every time!

But it's really not that bad, and I'm sure you'll figure it out after a few tries. Measuring the ratio correctly is easy enough (though you may want to adjust it if you find it's consistently not quite to your tastes), and beyond that you just have to be careful not to let it cook too hot and stick.

You can cook rice like pasta, boiling in excess water until done then draining. But there are a couple main reasons not to:

  • You'll wash away a lot of the starch. Especially for starchier varieties (short and medium grain), this may not be a good thing - you'll end up with distinct grains, not nice slightly sticky rice.
  • It can be a pain to drain properly. You probably have a colander for pasta, with holes large enough that rice will fall through. If you use a metal sieve, it can be prone to getting little bits stuck in it, making it hard to clean.
  • If you accidentally overcook it, it'll be awful, soft and mushy. If on the other hand you cook with the right amount of water, it'll just stick to the pot on the bottom, leaving most of it still good on top.

So if you're having trouble with traditional methods, you can try boiling, or try a pilaf (I'll add an example later), which will be less prone to sticking and overcooking. Or else you can just get a rice cooker and get it right every time!

But it's really not that bad, and I'm sure you'll figure it out after a few tries. Measuring the ratio correctly is easy enough (though you may want to adjust it if you find it's consistently not quite to your tastes), and beyond that you just have to be careful not to let it cook too hot and stick.

Also, for your specific experience, the half closed lid might have the problem. That will let a lot of steam escape, so you won't have enough water left to cook it properly. And adding more at the end is never as good as having it right to begin with, since it takes time for the new water to come up to temperature, and the rice has time to get soggy on the outside without cooking thoroughly. The method I've always known is to simmer with a closed lid - just make sure you turn it down as soon as it's hot enough so it doesn't boil over or stick.

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source | link

You can cook rice like pasta, boiling in excess water until done then draining. But there are a couple main reasons not to:

  • You'll wash away a lot of the starch. Especially for starchier varieties (short and medium grain), this may not be a good thing - you'll end up with distinct grains, not nice slightly sticky rice.
  • It can be a pain to drain properly. You probably have a colander for pasta, with holes large enough that rice will fall through. If you use a metal sieve, it can be prone to getting little bits stuck in it, making it hard to clean.
  • If you accidentally overcook it, it'll be awful, soft and mushy. If on the other hand you cook with the right amount of water, it'll just stick to the pot on the bottom, leaving most of it still good on top.

So if you're having trouble with traditional methods, you can try boiling, or try a pilaf (I'll add an example later), which will be less prone to sticking and overcooking. Or else you can just get a rice cooker and get it right every time!

But it's really not that bad, and I'm sure you'll figure it out after a few tries. Measuring the ratio correctly is easy enough (though you may want to adjust it if you find it's consistently not quite to your tastes), and beyond that you just have to be careful not to let it cook too hot and stick.