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I've noticed that many candy recipes (specifically fudge recipes) instruct you to boil the mixture, then reduce to simmer, until you reach a specific temperature. My limited understanding of physics is that as the mixture simmers, water evaporates, and the more concentrated mixture has a higher boiling point.

So it makes sense that we stop at a certain temperature and that will be the desired consistency. But it takes a long time!

Is there any reason why I can't continue to boil for longer? Is it just to make it easier to stop at the correct point, or is there a lot more going on that wouldn't happen correctly at a higher temperature?

(P.S. - I found this similar question: http://cooking.stackexchange.com/questions/8416/why-should-a-stock-be-simmered-and-not-boiledWhy should a stock be simmered and not boiled? but I'm not sure the answer is applicable with fudge, but please correct me if I am wrong)

I've noticed that many candy recipes (specifically fudge recipes) instruct you to boil the mixture, then reduce to simmer, until you reach a specific temperature. My limited understanding of physics is that as the mixture simmers, water evaporates, and the more concentrated mixture has a higher boiling point.

So it makes sense that we stop at a certain temperature and that will be the desired consistency. But it takes a long time!

Is there any reason why I can't continue to boil for longer? Is it just to make it easier to stop at the correct point, or is there a lot more going on that wouldn't happen correctly at a higher temperature?

(P.S. - I found this similar question: http://cooking.stackexchange.com/questions/8416/why-should-a-stock-be-simmered-and-not-boiled but I'm not sure the answer is applicable with fudge, but please correct me if I am wrong)

I've noticed that many candy recipes (specifically fudge recipes) instruct you to boil the mixture, then reduce to simmer, until you reach a specific temperature. My limited understanding of physics is that as the mixture simmers, water evaporates, and the more concentrated mixture has a higher boiling point.

So it makes sense that we stop at a certain temperature and that will be the desired consistency. But it takes a long time!

Is there any reason why I can't continue to boil for longer? Is it just to make it easier to stop at the correct point, or is there a lot more going on that wouldn't happen correctly at a higher temperature?

(P.S. - I found this similar question: Why should a stock be simmered and not boiled? but I'm not sure the answer is applicable with fudge, but please correct me if I am wrong)

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Why Do We 'Simmer' Fudge Instead of 'Boiling' it?

I've noticed that many candy recipes (specifically fudge recipes) instruct you to boil the mixture, then reduce to simmer, until you reach a specific temperature. My limited understanding of physics is that as the mixture simmers, water evaporates, and the more concentrated mixture has a higher boiling point.

So it makes sense that we stop at a certain temperature and that will be the desired consistency. But it takes a long time!

Is there any reason why I can't continue to boil for longer? Is it just to make it easier to stop at the correct point, or is there a lot more going on that wouldn't happen correctly at a higher temperature?

(P.S. - I found this similar question: http://cooking.stackexchange.com/questions/8416/why-should-a-stock-be-simmered-and-not-boiled but I'm not sure the answer is applicable with fudge, but please correct me if I am wrong)