3 deleted 27 characters in body
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According to this page:

Whole fruits can be stored for a month in a cool, dry area, or refrigerated up to two months. The seed pips can be frozen in an airtight bag up to one year. Fresh juice should be refrigerated and used within two to three days.

In my experience in a very dry climate (Colorado) after a couple weeks the skins become desiccated and very hard—you need to saw through them with a serrated knife—but the seeds are still mostly unaffected. They will shrink somewhat, but still remain unspoiled and flavorful.

However, if you refrigerate them, ensure that you do not let them get too cold. According to this page:

[…] exposure to temperatures below 5°C (41°F) during storage and transport for longer than 4 weeks is a major cause of deterioration […]

The minimum safe storage temperature is 5°C (41°F) for up to 8 weeks, if decay is not a problem. For longer storage, the temperature should be at 7°C (45°F) to avoid chilling injury, but decay […] and weight loss may become a limitation.

photo comparing effects of different temperatures and durations http://ucanr.edu/blogs/FNRICblog//blogfiles/19979_original.jpgphoto comparing effects of different temperatures and durations

Sorry that the photo is not better quality.

According to this page:

Whole fruits can be stored for a month in a cool, dry area, or refrigerated up to two months. The seed pips can be frozen in an airtight bag up to one year. Fresh juice should be refrigerated and used within two to three days.

In my experience in a very dry climate (Colorado) after a couple weeks the skins become desiccated and very hard—you need to saw through them with a serrated knife—but the seeds are still mostly unaffected. They will shrink somewhat, but still remain unspoiled and flavorful.

However, if you refrigerate them, ensure that you do not let them get too cold. According to this page:

[…] exposure to temperatures below 5°C (41°F) during storage and transport for longer than 4 weeks is a major cause of deterioration […]

The minimum safe storage temperature is 5°C (41°F) for up to 8 weeks, if decay is not a problem. For longer storage, the temperature should be at 7°C (45°F) to avoid chilling injury, but decay […] and weight loss may become a limitation.

photo comparing effects of different temperatures and durations http://ucanr.edu/blogs/FNRICblog//blogfiles/19979_original.jpg

Sorry that the photo is not better quality.

According to this page:

Whole fruits can be stored for a month in a cool, dry area, or refrigerated up to two months. The seed pips can be frozen in an airtight bag up to one year. Fresh juice should be refrigerated and used within two to three days.

In my experience in a very dry climate (Colorado) after a couple weeks the skins become desiccated and very hard—you need to saw through them with a serrated knife—but the seeds are still mostly unaffected. They will shrink somewhat, but still remain unspoiled and flavorful.

However, if you refrigerate them, ensure that you do not let them get too cold. According to this page:

[…] exposure to temperatures below 5°C (41°F) during storage and transport for longer than 4 weeks is a major cause of deterioration […]

The minimum safe storage temperature is 5°C (41°F) for up to 8 weeks, if decay is not a problem. For longer storage, the temperature should be at 7°C (45°F) to avoid chilling injury, but decay […] and weight loss may become a limitation.

photo comparing effects of different temperatures and durations

Sorry that the photo is not better quality.

2 added 194 characters in body
source | link

According to this page:

Whole fruits can be stored for a month in a cool, dry area, or refrigerated up to two months. The seed pips can be frozen in an airtight bag up to one year. Fresh juice should be refrigerated and used within two to three days.

In my experience in a very dry climate (Colorado) after a couple weeks the skins become desiccated and very hard—you need to saw through them with a serrated knife—but the seeds are still mostly unaffected. They will shrink somewhat, but still remain unspoiled and flavorful.

However, if you refrigerate them, ensure that you do not let them get too cold. According to this page:

[…] exposure to temperatures below 5°C (41°F) during storage and transport for longer than 4 weeks is a major cause of deterioration […]

The minimum safe storage temperature is 5°C (41°F) for up to 8 weeks, if decay is not a problem. For longer storage, the temperature should be at 7°C (45°F) to avoid chilling injury, but decay […] and weight loss may become a limitation.

photo comparing effects of different temperatures and durations http://ucanr.edu/blogs/FNRICblog//blogfiles/19979_original.jpg

Sorry that the photo is not better quality.

According to this page:

Whole fruits can be stored for a month in a cool, dry area, or refrigerated up to two months. The seed pips can be frozen in an airtight bag up to one year. Fresh juice should be refrigerated and used within two to three days.

In my experience in a very dry climate (Colorado) after a couple weeks the skins become desiccated and very hard—you need to saw through them with a serrated knife—but the seeds are still mostly unaffected. They will shrink somewhat, but still remain unspoiled and flavorful.

However, if you refrigerate them, ensure that you do not let them get too cold. According to this page:

[…] exposure to temperatures below 5°C (41°F) during storage and transport for longer than 4 weeks is a major cause of deterioration […]

The minimum safe storage temperature is 5°C (41°F) for up to 8 weeks, if decay is not a problem. For longer storage, the temperature should be at 7°C (45°F) to avoid chilling injury, but decay […] and weight loss may become a limitation.

According to this page:

Whole fruits can be stored for a month in a cool, dry area, or refrigerated up to two months. The seed pips can be frozen in an airtight bag up to one year. Fresh juice should be refrigerated and used within two to three days.

In my experience in a very dry climate (Colorado) after a couple weeks the skins become desiccated and very hard—you need to saw through them with a serrated knife—but the seeds are still mostly unaffected. They will shrink somewhat, but still remain unspoiled and flavorful.

However, if you refrigerate them, ensure that you do not let them get too cold. According to this page:

[…] exposure to temperatures below 5°C (41°F) during storage and transport for longer than 4 weeks is a major cause of deterioration […]

The minimum safe storage temperature is 5°C (41°F) for up to 8 weeks, if decay is not a problem. For longer storage, the temperature should be at 7°C (45°F) to avoid chilling injury, but decay […] and weight loss may become a limitation.

photo comparing effects of different temperatures and durations http://ucanr.edu/blogs/FNRICblog//blogfiles/19979_original.jpg

Sorry that the photo is not better quality.

1
source | link

According to this page:

Whole fruits can be stored for a month in a cool, dry area, or refrigerated up to two months. The seed pips can be frozen in an airtight bag up to one year. Fresh juice should be refrigerated and used within two to three days.

In my experience in a very dry climate (Colorado) after a couple weeks the skins become desiccated and very hard—you need to saw through them with a serrated knife—but the seeds are still mostly unaffected. They will shrink somewhat, but still remain unspoiled and flavorful.

However, if you refrigerate them, ensure that you do not let them get too cold. According to this page:

[…] exposure to temperatures below 5°C (41°F) during storage and transport for longer than 4 weeks is a major cause of deterioration […]

The minimum safe storage temperature is 5°C (41°F) for up to 8 weeks, if decay is not a problem. For longer storage, the temperature should be at 7°C (45°F) to avoid chilling injury, but decay […] and weight loss may become a limitation.