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As Ogrecon’sOgrecon’s answer says, diced red onions slow down browning significantly, as long as the container that holds the onions and avocado remains closed and airtight. The onions release propanethiol S-oxide gas (that's what causes tearing), and as long as that gas doesn’t dissipate, that gas prevents the avocado from browning. This picture is of otherwise untreated avocado after nine hours in the refrigerator, tightly covered in tupperware containers. Even the containers are identical. One side has the onions, the other doesn’t.

Note: I found Wayfaring Stranger’s answerWayfaring Stranger’s answer very compelling. I had wanted to include sodium bisulfite in this experiment, but I had difficulty getting it, there are strict shipping rules regarding it. Why? Well, because it’s dangerous. I tried different shipping companies, different sources and obscure local chemical firms. There came a point when I realized I was being silly, no one here is going to buy a compound labeled, “May be fatal if swallowed” to keep their guacamole green. Yes, it is used commercially for that purpose, the results of that experiment might be interesting, but those results are unlikely to have practical value to anyone who would read them here. Since the Vitamin C is both safe and efficacious without the sodium bisulfite, I’m quitting while I am ahead.

As Ogrecon’s answer says, diced red onions slow down browning significantly, as long as the container that holds the onions and avocado remains closed and airtight. The onions release propanethiol S-oxide gas (that's what causes tearing), and as long as that gas doesn’t dissipate, that gas prevents the avocado from browning. This picture is of otherwise untreated avocado after nine hours in the refrigerator, tightly covered in tupperware containers. Even the containers are identical. One side has the onions, the other doesn’t.

Note: I found Wayfaring Stranger’s answer very compelling. I had wanted to include sodium bisulfite in this experiment, but I had difficulty getting it, there are strict shipping rules regarding it. Why? Well, because it’s dangerous. I tried different shipping companies, different sources and obscure local chemical firms. There came a point when I realized I was being silly, no one here is going to buy a compound labeled, “May be fatal if swallowed” to keep their guacamole green. Yes, it is used commercially for that purpose, the results of that experiment might be interesting, but those results are unlikely to have practical value to anyone who would read them here. Since the Vitamin C is both safe and efficacious without the sodium bisulfite, I’m quitting while I am ahead.

As Ogrecon’s answer says, diced red onions slow down browning significantly, as long as the container that holds the onions and avocado remains closed and airtight. The onions release propanethiol S-oxide gas (that's what causes tearing), and as long as that gas doesn’t dissipate, that gas prevents the avocado from browning. This picture is of otherwise untreated avocado after nine hours in the refrigerator, tightly covered in tupperware containers. Even the containers are identical. One side has the onions, the other doesn’t.

Note: I found Wayfaring Stranger’s answer very compelling. I had wanted to include sodium bisulfite in this experiment, but I had difficulty getting it, there are strict shipping rules regarding it. Why? Well, because it’s dangerous. I tried different shipping companies, different sources and obscure local chemical firms. There came a point when I realized I was being silly, no one here is going to buy a compound labeled, “May be fatal if swallowed” to keep their guacamole green. Yes, it is used commercially for that purpose, the results of that experiment might be interesting, but those results are unlikely to have practical value to anyone who would read them here. Since the Vitamin C is both safe and efficacious without the sodium bisulfite, I’m quitting while I am ahead.

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You can buy pure ascorbic acid powder, which I did and then promptly lost, or you can use a spice grinder to grind very pure tablets, which I also did. My tablets weighed .59 grams per 500mg tablet, so close enough. I also tasted the powder and it really had no chemicallyunpleasant chemical flavor, just a bit of acid effervescence feeling. You don't need to dissolve the powder, you can just stir it into mashed avocado. To keep sliced or diced avocados green, mix 1/2 tsp of the powder in 1 TBS of water (it will take some effort to get it mixed, but it will mix) and paint it on the surface or dunk in chunks, let them dry and refrigerate, covered.

As Ogrecon’s answer says, diced red onions slow down browning significantly, as long as the container that holds the onions and avocado remains closed and airtight. The onions release propanethiol S-oxide gas (that's what causes tearing), and as long as that gas doesn’t dissipate, that gas prevents the avocado from browning. This picture is of otherwise untreated avocado after nine hours in the refrigerator, tightly covered in tupperware containers. Even the containers are identical. One side has the onions, the other doesn’t.

You can buy pure ascorbic acid powder, which I did and then promptly lost, or you can use a spice grinder to grind very pure tablets, which I also did. My tablets weighed .59 grams per 500mg tablet, so close enough. I also tasted the powder and it really had no chemically flavor, just a bit of acid effervescence feeling. You don't need to dissolve the powder, you can just stir it into mashed avocado. To keep sliced or diced avocados green, mix 1/2 tsp of the powder in 1 TBS of water (it will take some effort to get it mixed, but it will mix) and paint it on the surface or dunk in chunks, let them dry and refrigerate, covered.

As Ogrecon’s answer says, diced red onions slow down browning significantly, as long as the container that holds the onions and avocado remains closed and airtight. The onions release propanethiol S-oxide gas, and as long as that gas doesn’t dissipate, that gas prevents the avocado from browning. This picture is of otherwise untreated avocado after nine hours in the refrigerator, tightly covered in tupperware containers. Even the containers are identical. One side has the onions, the other doesn’t.

You can buy pure ascorbic acid powder, which I did and then promptly lost, or you can use a spice grinder to grind very pure tablets, which I also did. My tablets weighed .59 grams per 500mg tablet, so close enough. I also tasted the powder and it really had no unpleasant chemical flavor, just a bit of acid effervescence feeling. You don't need to dissolve the powder, you can just stir it into mashed avocado. To keep sliced or diced avocados green, mix 1/2 tsp of the powder in 1 TBS of water (it will take some effort to get it mixed, but it will mix) and paint it on the surface or dunk in chunks, let them dry and refrigerate, covered.

As Ogrecon’s answer says, diced red onions slow down browning significantly, as long as the container that holds the onions and avocado remains closed and airtight. The onions release propanethiol S-oxide gas (that's what causes tearing), and as long as that gas doesn’t dissipate, that gas prevents the avocado from browning. This picture is of otherwise untreated avocado after nine hours in the refrigerator, tightly covered in tupperware containers. Even the containers are identical. One side has the onions, the other doesn’t.

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