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Caramelization is the oxidation of sugar, a process used extensively in cooking for the resulting nutty flavor and brown color. Caramelization is a type of non-enzymatic browning reaction. As the process occurs, volatile chemicals are released producing the characteristic caramel flavor. The reaction involves the removal of water (as steam) and the break down of the sugar. The caramelization reaction depends on the type of sugar. Sucrose and glucose caramelize around 160C (320F) and fructose caramelizes at 110C (230F).

Caramelization temperatures Sugar Temperature

Fructose 110° C, 230° F

Galactose 160° C, 320° F

Glucose 160° C, 320° F

Maltose 180° C, 356° F

Sucrose 160° C, 320° F

The highest rate of the color development is caused by fructose as caramelization of fructose starts at 110C. Baked goods made from honey or fructose syrup will therefore give a darker color. Source:

http://www.scienceofcooking.com/caramelization.htm

Since muscle tissue naturally contains glucose (galactose and fructose consumed buy the body are converted to glucose by the liver), muscle tissue (steak) caramelizes at a minimum of 160° C, 320° F. if you would like to test this, take an induction cooktop and set it to 300° F, when the pan has come to temp, place your meat in. it will cook without getting any of the nice crust you like (also it will take forever to cook, about 40 minutes for a 1" boneless steak to mid rare 130°F)

Hope this helps.

www.travisrutherford.com

Caramelization is the oxidation of sugar, a process used extensively in cooking for the resulting nutty flavor and brown color. Caramelization is a type of non-enzymatic browning reaction. As the process occurs, volatile chemicals are released producing the characteristic caramel flavor. The reaction involves the removal of water (as steam) and the break down of the sugar. The caramelization reaction depends on the type of sugar. Sucrose and glucose caramelize around 160C (320F) and fructose caramelizes at 110C (230F).

Caramelization temperatures Sugar Temperature

Fructose 110° C, 230° F

Galactose 160° C, 320° F

Glucose 160° C, 320° F

Maltose 180° C, 356° F

Sucrose 160° C, 320° F

The highest rate of the color development is caused by fructose as caramelization of fructose starts at 110C. Baked goods made from honey or fructose syrup will therefore give a darker color. Source:

http://www.scienceofcooking.com/caramelization.htm

Since muscle tissue naturally contains glucose (galactose and fructose consumed buy the body are converted to glucose by the liver), muscle tissue (steak) caramelizes at a minimum of 160° C, 320° F. if you would like to test this, take an induction cooktop and set it to 300° F, when the pan has come to temp, place your meat in. it will cook without getting any of the nice crust you like (also it will take forever to cook, about 40 minutes for a 1" boneless steak to mid rare 130°F)

Hope this helps.

www.travisrutherford.com

Caramelization is the oxidation of sugar, a process used extensively in cooking for the resulting nutty flavor and brown color. Caramelization is a type of non-enzymatic browning reaction. As the process occurs, volatile chemicals are released producing the characteristic caramel flavor. The reaction involves the removal of water (as steam) and the break down of the sugar. The caramelization reaction depends on the type of sugar. Sucrose and glucose caramelize around 160C (320F) and fructose caramelizes at 110C (230F).

Caramelization temperatures Sugar Temperature

Fructose 110° C, 230° F

Galactose 160° C, 320° F

Glucose 160° C, 320° F

Maltose 180° C, 356° F

Sucrose 160° C, 320° F

The highest rate of the color development is caused by fructose as caramelization of fructose starts at 110C. Baked goods made from honey or fructose syrup will therefore give a darker color. Source:

http://www.scienceofcooking.com/caramelization.htm

Since muscle tissue naturally contains glucose (galactose and fructose consumed buy the body are converted to glucose by the liver), muscle tissue (steak) caramelizes at a minimum of 160° C, 320° F. if you would like to test this, take an induction cooktop and set it to 300° F, when the pan has come to temp, place your meat in. it will cook without getting any of the nice crust you like (also it will take forever to cook, about 40 minutes for a 1" boneless steak to mid rare 130°F).

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Caramelization is the oxidation of sugar, a process used extensively in cooking for the resulting nutty flavor and brown color. Caramelization is a type of non-enzymatic browning reaction. As the process occurs, volatile chemicals are released producing the characteristic caramel flavor. The reaction involves the removal of water (as steam) and the break down of the sugar. The caramelization reaction depends on the type of sugar. Sucrose and glucose caramelize around 160C (320F) and fructose caramelizes at 110C (230F).

Caramelization temperatures Sugar Temperature

Fructose 110° C, 230° F

Galactose 160° C, 320° F

Glucose 160° C, 320° F

Maltose 180° C, 356° F

Sucrose 160° C, 320° F

The highest rate of the color development is caused by fructose as caramelization of fructose starts at 110C. Baked goods made from honey or fructose syrup will therefore give a darker color. Source:

http://www.scienceofcooking.com/caramelization.htm

Since muscle tissue naturally contains glucose (galactose and fructose consumed buy the body are converted to glucose by the liver), muscle tissue (steak) caramelizes at a minimum of 160° C, 320° F. if you would like to test this, take an induction cooktop and set it to 300° F, when the pan has come to temp, place your meat in. it will cook without getting any of the nice crust you like (also it will take forever to cook, about 40 minutes for a 1" boneless steak to mid rare 130°F)

Hope this helps.

www.travisrutherford.com