2 progress on my technique
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I've come across this video of a very impressive japanese omelet and I've been trying to understand how it's done and what do I need to make it at home.

I've seen this video reproducing the technique, but the omelet's surface is not smooth at all.

I'm trying to reverse engineer this omelet and learn the key techniques to accomplish that.

My attempt so far has been on comparing what I can see to what I've read on traditional french omelets.

What I have come up with:

  • Traditional french omelet is done on medium-high heat, and this one seems to be done at very high heat.
  • Traditional french omelet takes milk or water (I've read on other questions here that water works best). The second video seems to use just eggs and comes out kinda bad. The kyoto guy seems to have a very smooth egg mixture but we don't know for sure if it's just eggs or what.
  • In french omelets, on the first seconds since you pour the eggs into the pan, eggs are mixed from the outside-in in order to allow a thicker layer of cooked eggs before turning the omelet. This kind of omelet is mixed in apparently quick random chopstick movements combined with shaking the pan, possibly because of the much higher heat?
  • Once the a layer of cooked eggs start to form underneath the omelet they should be flipped over. In french omelets, ends meet sideways. In the kyoto video, it seems the ends meet on the top, flipping them with cooking chopsticks in one direction, and turning them over with hand movements in the other direction. This seems to be important for the baloony shape of the omelet. Here the second video almost falls short. The ends of the omelet meet, but they are not perfectly tied.

UPDATE 1

My omelets are successfully runny on the inside and smoothly cooked on the outside. Watching Alton Brown's omelet advice was key into mastering this, also getting a new pan with a smooth nonstick surface.

I had been on a plateau for quite some time trying to make the omelet turn on itself while in the pan.

I was practicing using traditional pan flipping motion, the same one used for doing pancakes, and it was practically impossible to make the omelet turn on itself.

Watching the videos again I think I'm starting to get it. The trick seems to be punching the pan, which leaves the omelet in free fall and makes it spin on itself.

I managed to get the omelet to spin and turn completely over. I didn't manage yet to make the ends meet, melt into each other and turn the omelet into that impressive american football shape.

I've come across this video of a very impressive japanese omelet and I've been trying to understand how it's done and what do I need to make it at home.

I've seen this video reproducing the technique, but the omelet's surface is not smooth at all.

I'm trying to reverse engineer this omelet and learn the key techniques to accomplish that.

My attempt so far has been on comparing what I can see to what I've read on traditional french omelets.

What I have come up with:

  • Traditional french omelet is done on medium-high heat, and this one seems to be done at very high heat.
  • Traditional french omelet takes milk or water (I've read on other questions here that water works best). The second video seems to use just eggs and comes out kinda bad. The kyoto guy seems to have a very smooth egg mixture but we don't know for sure if it's just eggs or what.
  • In french omelets, on the first seconds since you pour the eggs into the pan, eggs are mixed from the outside-in in order to allow a thicker layer of cooked eggs before turning the omelet. This kind of omelet is mixed in apparently quick random chopstick movements combined with shaking the pan, possibly because of the much higher heat?
  • Once the a layer of cooked eggs start to form underneath the omelet they should be flipped over. In french omelets, ends meet sideways. In the kyoto video, it seems the ends meet on the top, flipping them with cooking chopsticks in one direction, and turning them over with hand movements in the other direction. This seems to be important for the baloony shape of the omelet. Here the second video almost falls short. The ends of the omelet meet, but they are not perfectly tied.

I've come across this video of a very impressive japanese omelet and I've been trying to understand how it's done and what do I need to make it at home.

I've seen this video reproducing the technique, but the omelet's surface is not smooth at all.

I'm trying to reverse engineer this omelet and learn the key techniques to accomplish that.

My attempt so far has been on comparing what I can see to what I've read on traditional french omelets.

What I have come up with:

  • Traditional french omelet is done on medium-high heat, and this one seems to be done at very high heat.
  • Traditional french omelet takes milk or water (I've read on other questions here that water works best). The second video seems to use just eggs and comes out kinda bad. The kyoto guy seems to have a very smooth egg mixture but we don't know for sure if it's just eggs or what.
  • In french omelets, on the first seconds since you pour the eggs into the pan, eggs are mixed from the outside-in in order to allow a thicker layer of cooked eggs before turning the omelet. This kind of omelet is mixed in apparently quick random chopstick movements combined with shaking the pan, possibly because of the much higher heat?
  • Once the a layer of cooked eggs start to form underneath the omelet they should be flipped over. In french omelets, ends meet sideways. In the kyoto video, it seems the ends meet on the top, flipping them with cooking chopsticks in one direction, and turning them over with hand movements in the other direction. This seems to be important for the baloony shape of the omelet. Here the second video almost falls short. The ends of the omelet meet, but they are not perfectly tied.

UPDATE 1

My omelets are successfully runny on the inside and smoothly cooked on the outside. Watching Alton Brown's omelet advice was key into mastering this, also getting a new pan with a smooth nonstick surface.

I had been on a plateau for quite some time trying to make the omelet turn on itself while in the pan.

I was practicing using traditional pan flipping motion, the same one used for doing pancakes, and it was practically impossible to make the omelet turn on itself.

Watching the videos again I think I'm starting to get it. The trick seems to be punching the pan, which leaves the omelet in free fall and makes it spin on itself.

I managed to get the omelet to spin and turn completely over. I didn't manage yet to make the ends meet, melt into each other and turn the omelet into that impressive american football shape.

    Tweeted twitter.com/#!/StackCooking/status/559402080214196225
1
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Reverse engineer the Perfect Japanese Omelet

I've come across this video of a very impressive japanese omelet and I've been trying to understand how it's done and what do I need to make it at home.

I've seen this video reproducing the technique, but the omelet's surface is not smooth at all.

I'm trying to reverse engineer this omelet and learn the key techniques to accomplish that.

My attempt so far has been on comparing what I can see to what I've read on traditional french omelets.

What I have come up with:

  • Traditional french omelet is done on medium-high heat, and this one seems to be done at very high heat.
  • Traditional french omelet takes milk or water (I've read on other questions here that water works best). The second video seems to use just eggs and comes out kinda bad. The kyoto guy seems to have a very smooth egg mixture but we don't know for sure if it's just eggs or what.
  • In french omelets, on the first seconds since you pour the eggs into the pan, eggs are mixed from the outside-in in order to allow a thicker layer of cooked eggs before turning the omelet. This kind of omelet is mixed in apparently quick random chopstick movements combined with shaking the pan, possibly because of the much higher heat?
  • Once the a layer of cooked eggs start to form underneath the omelet they should be flipped over. In french omelets, ends meet sideways. In the kyoto video, it seems the ends meet on the top, flipping them with cooking chopsticks in one direction, and turning them over with hand movements in the other direction. This seems to be important for the baloony shape of the omelet. Here the second video almost falls short. The ends of the omelet meet, but they are not perfectly tied.