2 Added a few links as reference to why I'm posting the question
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So I have been reading and hearing a lot about Robuchon (to name one) boiling his potatoes skin on to counteract gluey mashed potatoes. When I make my mash though I think it's way easier to peel them pre boiling and simmer the potato skin in the milk that I'm later gonna use to emulsify the butter and potatoes. Normally I have to add quite a lot of milk (2 parts potatoes to 1 part butter and almost 1 part milk) before I end up with a mash that isn't gluey. This makes for quite a loose mash though. Would it be correct to say that boiling the potatoes with the skin on would lower the risk of having a gluey mash with less milk? And if so, then why?

To give some reference to where I found the habit of using the ratios mentioned above I put a link here to a transcript of a Joel Robuchon mashed potatoes recipe. http://greenmarketrecipes.com/vegetables/robuchons_mashed_pototoes.htm

Also I include a link to a youtube video of Tom Aikens, a former chef under Joel Robuchon, who speaks about the question I am posting here. This is the reason for my question in the first place. https://youtu.be/S-Gkne6skXc?t=25m19s

So I have been reading and hearing a lot about Robuchon (to name one) boiling his potatoes skin on to counteract gluey mashed potatoes. When I make my mash though I think it's way easier to peel them pre boiling and simmer the potato skin in the milk that I'm later gonna use to emulsify the butter and potatoes. Normally I have to add quite a lot of milk (2 parts potatoes to 1 part butter and almost 1 part milk) before I end up with a mash that isn't gluey. This makes for quite a loose mash though. Would it be correct to say that boiling the potatoes with the skin on would lower the risk of having a gluey mash with less milk? And if so, then why?

So I have been reading and hearing a lot about Robuchon (to name one) boiling his potatoes skin on to counteract gluey mashed potatoes. When I make my mash though I think it's way easier to peel them pre boiling and simmer the potato skin in the milk that I'm later gonna use to emulsify the butter and potatoes. Normally I have to add quite a lot of milk (2 parts potatoes to 1 part butter and almost 1 part milk) before I end up with a mash that isn't gluey. This makes for quite a loose mash though. Would it be correct to say that boiling the potatoes with the skin on would lower the risk of having a gluey mash with less milk? And if so, then why?

To give some reference to where I found the habit of using the ratios mentioned above I put a link here to a transcript of a Joel Robuchon mashed potatoes recipe. http://greenmarketrecipes.com/vegetables/robuchons_mashed_pototoes.htm

Also I include a link to a youtube video of Tom Aikens, a former chef under Joel Robuchon, who speaks about the question I am posting here. This is the reason for my question in the first place. https://youtu.be/S-Gkne6skXc?t=25m19s

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Potatoes boiled with skin on makes less gluey mash?

So I have been reading and hearing a lot about Robuchon (to name one) boiling his potatoes skin on to counteract gluey mashed potatoes. When I make my mash though I think it's way easier to peel them pre boiling and simmer the potato skin in the milk that I'm later gonna use to emulsify the butter and potatoes. Normally I have to add quite a lot of milk (2 parts potatoes to 1 part butter and almost 1 part milk) before I end up with a mash that isn't gluey. This makes for quite a loose mash though. Would it be correct to say that boiling the potatoes with the skin on would lower the risk of having a gluey mash with less milk? And if so, then why?