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"Hotness" is a quite vague description which can be caused by a number of chemical compounds and is percieved by various receptors.

  • Chili peppers (capsicum) contain the alkaloid capsaicin. If your restaurant insisted that there were no chilis included, there is a slight possibility that they used it under another name (ethnic restaurants or other regions of the world come to mind) e.g. "pereroni" or "paprika".
    (Not that I am implying anything here!)
  • Black pepper (piper nigrum) and long pepper contains another alkaloid, the piperine, which gives the seeds their hotness.
  • Ginger contains gingerol, which is chemically similar to capsicain and piperine and can be very hot, especially in dried ginger, which loosesloses a lot of the lemony-freshness and gains hotness due to chemical processes that change gingerol into shoagol, which is about twice as "hot". Shoagol has about 160,000 SHU on the scoville scale - more than piperine, less that capsicain.
  • Sichuan pepper (no relative despite the name) creates a less-hot-more-numb-to-tingling feeling.
  • Mustard and horseradish (and to a lesser extent radishes, cress and other plants) contain glucosinolates, which we percieve as pungent, sharp or hot. An extreme example for glucosinolate-hotness is wasabi.
  • Raw garlic and raw onions contain allicin (or, in onions, isoalliin) that has a sharp/biting/hot taste and which contributes to the percieved hotness of fresh garlic and the teary-eyed effect when choppig onions. Interesting fact: Allicin binds both to the receptors that percieve the capsicain-hotness and those for mustard-hotness.
  • Cinnamon contains an aromatic essential oil with cinnamaldehyde as main component. The essential oil is very hot, hence cinnamon can taste very hot, especially in "generous" doses.

"Hotness" is a quite vague description which can be caused by a number of chemical compounds and is percieved by various receptors.

  • Chili peppers (capsicum) contain the alkaloid capsaicin. If your restaurant insisted that there were no chilis included, there is a slight possibility that they used it under another name (ethnic restaurants or other regions of the world come to mind) e.g. "pereroni" or "paprika".
    (Not that I am implying anything here!)
  • Black pepper (piper nigrum) and long pepper contains another alkaloid, the piperine, which gives the seeds their hotness.
  • Ginger contains gingerol, which is chemically similar to capsicain and piperine and can be very hot, especially in dried ginger, which looses a lot of the lemony-freshness and gains hotness due to chemical processes that change gingerol into shoagol, which is about twice as "hot". Shoagol has about 160,000 SHU on the scoville scale - more than piperine, less that capsicain.
  • Sichuan pepper (no relative despite the name) creates a less-hot-more-numb-to-tingling feeling.
  • Mustard and horseradish (and to a lesser extent radishes, cress and other plants) contain glucosinolates, which we percieve as pungent, sharp or hot. An extreme example for glucosinolate-hotness is wasabi.
  • Raw garlic and raw onions contain allicin (or, in onions, isoalliin) that has a sharp/biting/hot taste and which contributes to the percieved hotness of fresh garlic and the teary-eyed effect when choppig onions. Interesting fact: Allicin binds both to the receptors that percieve the capsicain-hotness and those for mustard-hotness.
  • Cinnamon contains an aromatic essential oil with cinnamaldehyde as main component. The essential oil is very hot, hence cinnamon can taste very hot, especially in "generous" doses.

"Hotness" is a quite vague description which can be caused by a number of chemical compounds and is percieved by various receptors.

  • Chili peppers (capsicum) contain the alkaloid capsaicin. If your restaurant insisted that there were no chilis included, there is a slight possibility that they used it under another name (ethnic restaurants or other regions of the world come to mind) e.g. "pereroni" or "paprika".
    (Not that I am implying anything here!)
  • Black pepper (piper nigrum) and long pepper contains another alkaloid, the piperine, which gives the seeds their hotness.
  • Ginger contains gingerol, which is chemically similar to capsicain and piperine and can be very hot, especially in dried ginger, which loses a lot of the lemony-freshness and gains hotness due to chemical processes that change gingerol into shoagol, which is about twice as "hot". Shoagol has about 160,000 SHU on the scoville scale - more than piperine, less that capsicain.
  • Sichuan pepper (no relative despite the name) creates a less-hot-more-numb-to-tingling feeling.
  • Mustard and horseradish (and to a lesser extent radishes, cress and other plants) contain glucosinolates, which we percieve as pungent, sharp or hot. An extreme example for glucosinolate-hotness is wasabi.
  • Raw garlic and raw onions contain allicin (or, in onions, isoalliin) that has a sharp/biting/hot taste and which contributes to the percieved hotness of fresh garlic and the teary-eyed effect when choppig onions. Interesting fact: Allicin binds both to the receptors that percieve the capsicain-hotness and those for mustard-hotness.
  • Cinnamon contains an aromatic essential oil with cinnamaldehyde as main component. The essential oil is very hot, hence cinnamon can taste very hot, especially in "generous" doses.
3 spelling correction
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"Hotness" is a quite vague description which can be caused by a number of chemical compounds and is percieved by various receptors.

  • Chili peppers (capsicum) contain the alkaloid capsaicin. If your restaurant insisted that there were no chilis included, there is a slight possibility that they used it under another name (ethnic restaurants or other regions of the world come to mind) e.g. "pereroni" or "paprika".
    (Not that I am implying anything here!)
  • Black pepper (piper nigrum) and long pepper contains another alkaloid, the piperine, which gives the seeds their hotness.
  • Ginger contains gingerol, which is chemically similar to capsicain and piperine and can be very hot, especially in dried ginger, which looses a lot of the lemony-freshness and gains hotness due to chemical processes that change gingerol into shoagol, which is about twice as "hot". Shoagol has about 160,000 SHU on the scoville scale - more than piperine, less that capsicain.
  • Sichuan pepper (no relative despite the name) creates a less-hot-more-numb-to-tingling feeling.
  • Mustard and horseradish (and to a lesser extent radishes, cress and other plants) contain glucosinolates, which we percieve as pungent, sharp or hot. An extreme example for glucosinolate-hotness is wasabi.
  • Raw garlic and raw onions contain allicin (or, in onions, isoalliin) that has a sharp/biting/hot taste and which contributes to the percieved hotness of fresh garlic and the teary-eyed effect when choppig onions. Interesting fact: Allicin binds both to the receptors that percieve the capsicain-hotness and those for mustard-hotness.
  • Cinnamon contains an aromatic essential oil with cinnamaldehyde as main component. The essential oil is very hot, hence cimmanomcinnamon can taste very hot, especially in "generous" doses.

"Hotness" is a quite vague description which can be caused by a number of chemical compounds and is percieved by various receptors.

  • Chili peppers (capsicum) contain the alkaloid capsaicin. If your restaurant insisted that there were no chilis included, there is a slight possibility that they used it under another name (ethnic restaurants or other regions of the world come to mind) e.g. "pereroni" or "paprika".
    (Not that I am implying anything here!)
  • Black pepper (piper nigrum) and long pepper contains another alkaloid, the piperine, which gives the seeds their hotness.
  • Ginger contains gingerol, which is chemically similar to capsicain and piperine and can be very hot, especially in dried ginger, which looses a lot of the lemony-freshness and gains hotness due to chemical processes that change gingerol into shoagol, which is about twice as "hot". Shoagol has about 160,000 SHU on the scoville scale - more than piperine, less that capsicain.
  • Sichuan pepper (no relative despite the name) creates a less-hot-more-numb-to-tingling feeling.
  • Mustard and horseradish (and to a lesser extent radishes, cress and other plants) contain glucosinolates, which we percieve as pungent, sharp or hot. An extreme example for glucosinolate-hotness is wasabi.
  • Raw garlic and raw onions contain allicin (or, in onions, isoalliin) that has a sharp/biting/hot taste and which contributes to the percieved hotness of fresh garlic and the teary-eyed effect when choppig onions. Interesting fact: Allicin binds both to the receptors that percieve the capsicain-hotness and those for mustard-hotness.
  • Cinnamon contains an aromatic essential oil with cinnamaldehyde as main component. The essential oil is very hot, hence cimmanom can taste very hot, especially in "generous" doses.

"Hotness" is a quite vague description which can be caused by a number of chemical compounds and is percieved by various receptors.

  • Chili peppers (capsicum) contain the alkaloid capsaicin. If your restaurant insisted that there were no chilis included, there is a slight possibility that they used it under another name (ethnic restaurants or other regions of the world come to mind) e.g. "pereroni" or "paprika".
    (Not that I am implying anything here!)
  • Black pepper (piper nigrum) and long pepper contains another alkaloid, the piperine, which gives the seeds their hotness.
  • Ginger contains gingerol, which is chemically similar to capsicain and piperine and can be very hot, especially in dried ginger, which looses a lot of the lemony-freshness and gains hotness due to chemical processes that change gingerol into shoagol, which is about twice as "hot". Shoagol has about 160,000 SHU on the scoville scale - more than piperine, less that capsicain.
  • Sichuan pepper (no relative despite the name) creates a less-hot-more-numb-to-tingling feeling.
  • Mustard and horseradish (and to a lesser extent radishes, cress and other plants) contain glucosinolates, which we percieve as pungent, sharp or hot. An extreme example for glucosinolate-hotness is wasabi.
  • Raw garlic and raw onions contain allicin (or, in onions, isoalliin) that has a sharp/biting/hot taste and which contributes to the percieved hotness of fresh garlic and the teary-eyed effect when choppig onions. Interesting fact: Allicin binds both to the receptors that percieve the capsicain-hotness and those for mustard-hotness.
  • Cinnamon contains an aromatic essential oil with cinnamaldehyde as main component. The essential oil is very hot, hence cinnamon can taste very hot, especially in "generous" doses.
2 Cinnamon added
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"Hotness" is a quite vague description which can be caused by a number of chemical compounds and is percieved by various receptors.

  • Chili peppers (capsicum) contain the alkaloid capsaicin. If your restaurant insisted that there were no chilis included, there is a slight possibility that they used it under another name (ethnic restaurants or other regions of the world come to mind) e.g. "pereroni" or "paprika".
    (Not that I am implying anything here!)
  • Black pepper (piper nigrum) and long pepper contains another alkaloid, the piperine, which gives the seeds their hotness.
  • Ginger contains gingerol, which is chemically similar to capsicain and piperine and can be very hot, especially in dried ginger, which looses a lot of the lemony-freshness and gains hotness due to chemical processes that change gingerol into shoagol, which is about twice as "hot". Shoagol has about 160,000 SHU on the scoville scale - more than piperine, less that capsicain.
  • Sichuan pepper (no relative despite the name) creates a less-hot-more-numb-to-tingling feeling.
  • Mustard and horseradish (and to a lesser extent radishes, cress and other plants) contain glucosinolates, which we percieve as pungent, sharp or hot. An extreme example for glucosinolate-hotness is wasabi.
  • Raw garlic and raw onions contain allicin (or, in onions, isoalliin) that has a sharp/biting/hot taste and which contributes to the percieved hotness of fresh garlic and the teary-eyed effect when choppig onions. Interesting fact: Allicin binds both to the receptors that percieve the capsicain-hotness and those for mustard-hotness.
  • Cinnamon contains an aromatic essential oil with cinnamaldehyde as main component. The essential oil is very hot, hence cimmanom can taste very hot, especially in "generous" doses.

"Hotness" is a quite vague description which can be caused by a number of chemical compounds and is percieved by various receptors.

  • Chili peppers (capsicum) contain the alkaloid capsaicin. If your restaurant insisted that there were no chilis included, there is a slight possibility that they used it under another name (ethnic restaurants or other regions of the world come to mind) e.g. "pereroni" or "paprika".
    (Not that I am implying anything here!)
  • Black pepper (piper nigrum) and long pepper contains another alkaloid, the piperine, which gives the seeds their hotness.
  • Ginger contains gingerol, which is chemically similar to capsicain and piperine and can be very hot, especially in dried ginger, which looses a lot of the lemony-freshness and gains hotness due to chemical processes that change gingerol into shoagol, which is about twice as "hot". Shoagol has about 160,000 SHU on the scoville scale - more than piperine, less that capsicain.
  • Sichuan pepper (no relative despite the name) creates a less-hot-more-numb-to-tingling feeling.
  • Mustard and horseradish (and to a lesser extent radishes, cress and other plants) contain glucosinolates, which we percieve as pungent, sharp or hot. An extreme example for glucosinolate-hotness is wasabi.
  • Raw garlic and raw onions contain allicin (or, in onions, isoalliin) that has a sharp/biting/hot taste and which contributes to the percieved hotness of fresh garlic and the teary-eyed effect when choppig onions. Interesting fact: Allicin binds both to the receptors that percieve the capsicain-hotness and those for mustard-hotness.

"Hotness" is a quite vague description which can be caused by a number of chemical compounds and is percieved by various receptors.

  • Chili peppers (capsicum) contain the alkaloid capsaicin. If your restaurant insisted that there were no chilis included, there is a slight possibility that they used it under another name (ethnic restaurants or other regions of the world come to mind) e.g. "pereroni" or "paprika".
    (Not that I am implying anything here!)
  • Black pepper (piper nigrum) and long pepper contains another alkaloid, the piperine, which gives the seeds their hotness.
  • Ginger contains gingerol, which is chemically similar to capsicain and piperine and can be very hot, especially in dried ginger, which looses a lot of the lemony-freshness and gains hotness due to chemical processes that change gingerol into shoagol, which is about twice as "hot". Shoagol has about 160,000 SHU on the scoville scale - more than piperine, less that capsicain.
  • Sichuan pepper (no relative despite the name) creates a less-hot-more-numb-to-tingling feeling.
  • Mustard and horseradish (and to a lesser extent radishes, cress and other plants) contain glucosinolates, which we percieve as pungent, sharp or hot. An extreme example for glucosinolate-hotness is wasabi.
  • Raw garlic and raw onions contain allicin (or, in onions, isoalliin) that has a sharp/biting/hot taste and which contributes to the percieved hotness of fresh garlic and the teary-eyed effect when choppig onions. Interesting fact: Allicin binds both to the receptors that percieve the capsicain-hotness and those for mustard-hotness.
  • Cinnamon contains an aromatic essential oil with cinnamaldehyde as main component. The essential oil is very hot, hence cimmanom can taste very hot, especially in "generous" doses.
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