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We buy ordinary, American-style white sandwich bread from a national supermarket chain. I just had a look at the ingredients and was surprised to see that, in addition to wheat flour, it contains lupin flour (Lupinenmehl in German):

Packaging for REWE Beste Wahl American Sandwich loaf, listing "Lupinenmehl" as one of the ingredients

I know that lupin seeds are edible when prepared properly, but what are they doing in ordinary white bread? I can't imagine that they're any cheaper than ordinary wheat flour. And this isn't some sort of fancy artisanal bread where the use of exotic grains is a selling point; it's just the regular store-brand sandwich bread. Does adding lupin flour in white wheat bread have a particular benefit in terms of taste, texture, preservation, etc.?

We buy ordinary, American-style white sandwich bread from a national supermarket chain. I just had a look at the ingredients and was surprised to see that, in addition to wheat flour, it contains lupin flour (Lupinenmehl in German):

Packaging for REWE Beste Wahl American Sandwich loaf, listing "Lupinenmehl" as one of the ingredients

I know that lupin seeds are edible when prepared properly, but what are they doing in ordinary white bread? I can't imagine that they're any cheaper than ordinary wheat flour. And this isn't some sort of fancy artisanal bread where the use of exotic grains is a selling point; it's just the regular store-brand sandwich bread. Does adding lupin flour in white wheat bread have a particular benefit in terms of taste, texture, preservation, etc.?

We buy ordinary, American-style white sandwich bread from a national supermarket chain. I just had a look at the ingredients and was surprised to see that, in addition to wheat flour, it contains lupin flour (Lupinenmehl in German):

Packaging for REWE Beste Wahl American Sandwich loaf, listing "Lupinenmehl" as one of the ingredients

I know that lupin seeds are edible when prepared properly, but what are they doing in ordinary white bread? I can't imagine that they're any cheaper than ordinary wheat flour. And this isn't some sort of fancy artisanal bread where the use of exotic grains is a selling point; it's just the regular store-brand sandwich bread. Does adding lupin flour in white wheat bread have a particular benefit in terms of taste, texture, preservation, etc.?

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Why add lupin flour to white bread?

We buy ordinary, American-style white sandwich bread from a national supermarket chain. I just had a look at the ingredients and was surprised to see that, in addition to wheat flour, it contains lupin flour (Lupinenmehl in German):

Packaging for REWE Beste Wahl American Sandwich loaf, listing "Lupinenmehl" as one of the ingredients

I know that lupin seeds are edible when prepared properly, but what are they doing in ordinary white bread? I can't imagine that they're any cheaper than ordinary wheat flour. And this isn't some sort of fancy artisanal bread where the use of exotic grains is a selling point; it's just the regular store-brand sandwich bread. Does adding lupin flour in white wheat bread have a particular benefit in terms of taste, texture, preservation, etc.?