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There's another reason I haven't seen mentioned yet: itRemoving the scum makes it more difficulteasier to control the simmeringtemperature of the stock so you can maintain a constant simmer. If you don't skim it off, the "scum"scum aggregates in a foamy layer on the surface, which acts as insulation. It traps more heat in the stock and can cause your stock to boil when it would normallyotherwise be simmering. SinceAlso, since stock often sits unattended on the stove while simmering, un-skimmed stock also presents a risk of boil-over.

There's another reason I haven't seen mentioned yet: it makes it more difficult to control the simmering of the stock . If you don't skim it off, the "scum" aggregates in a foamy layer on the surface, which acts as insulation. It traps more heat in the stock and can cause your stock to boil when it would normally be simmering. Since stock often sits unattended on the stove while simmering, un-skimmed stock also presents a risk of boil-over.

Removing the scum makes it easier to control the temperature of the stock so you can maintain a constant simmer. If you don't skim it off, the scum aggregates in a foamy layer on the surface, which acts as insulation. It traps more heat in the stock and can cause your stock to boil when it would otherwise be simmering. Also, since stock often sits unattended on the stove while simmering, un-skimmed stock presents a risk of boil-over.

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There's another reason I haven't seen mentioned yet: it makes it more difficult to control the simmering of the stock . If you don't skim it off, the "scum" aggregates in a foamy layer on the surface, which acts as insulation. It traps more heat in the stock and can cause your stock to boil when it would normally be simmering. Since stock often sits unattended on the stove while simmering, un-skimmed stock also presents a risk of boil-over.