5 added 92 characters in body
source | link

No they. They do not have to be burnt. Burning it is a sign that you need to adjust your cooking technique. Roti's and parathas can develop brown spots which are ok and very dark brown spots which are also ok. But if it is black and has a burnt taste, you can be sure the person cooking it has not exercised due care.  

Burning/charring till black spots are visible, is not an inherent part of the recipe.

For those who love the smoky, burnt flavour: Yes, there are recipes of other dishes (like the burnt cake or the smoked brinjal) where the recipe explicitly mentions burning or smoking, so that you get that flavour. But that's not the case with parathas, naans and rotis.

Here's what you need to know:
Parathas:
Recipe1: Mentions "...make sure you keep on regulating the temperature while frying as too hot the tava may burn the paratha".
Recipe2: Mentions "If the paratha sticks to the tava, it is not hot enough, if it become too dark quickly or burn it means it is too hot adjusting the heat accordingly".
Recipe3: Mentions "Ensure that oil is sufficient and paratha does not burn".

Naan:
Recipe1: Mentions "The secret to cooking a good naan is to cook it as fast as you can without burning it!".
Recipe2: Mentions "Do not let garlic naan get burned. Cook till it gets golden brown color".

Roti:
Recipe1: Mentions "Use your judgment as not to burn the roti off".
Recipe2: Mentions "cook the side down keeping an eye that it doesn't burn the roti on side down".

No they do not have to be burnt. Burning it is a sign that you need to adjust your cooking technique. Roti's and parathas can develop brown spots which are ok and very dark brown spots which are also ok. But if it is black and has a burnt taste, you can be sure the person cooking it has not exercised due care.  

For those who love the smoky, burnt flavour: Yes, there are recipes of other dishes (like the burnt cake or the smoked brinjal) where the recipe explicitly mentions burning or smoking, so that you get that flavour. But that's not the case with parathas, naans and rotis.

Here's what you need to know:
Parathas:
Recipe1: Mentions "...make sure you keep on regulating the temperature while frying as too hot the tava may burn the paratha".
Recipe2: Mentions "If the paratha sticks to the tava, it is not hot enough, if it become too dark quickly or burn it means it is too hot adjusting the heat accordingly".
Recipe3: Mentions "Ensure that oil is sufficient and paratha does not burn".

Naan:
Recipe1: Mentions "The secret to cooking a good naan is to cook it as fast as you can without burning it!".
Recipe2: Mentions "Do not let garlic naan get burned. Cook till it gets golden brown color".

Roti:
Recipe1: Mentions "Use your judgment as not to burn the roti off".
Recipe2: Mentions "cook the side down keeping an eye that it doesn't burn the roti on side down".

No. They do not have to be burnt. Burning it is a sign that you need to adjust your cooking technique. Roti's and parathas can develop brown spots which are ok and very dark brown spots which are also ok. But if it is black and has a burnt taste, you can be sure the person cooking it has not exercised due care.

Burning/charring till black spots are visible, is not an inherent part of the recipe.

For those who love the smoky, burnt flavour: Yes, there are recipes of other dishes (like the burnt cake or the smoked brinjal) where the recipe explicitly mentions burning or smoking, so that you get that flavour. But that's not the case with parathas, naans and rotis.

Here's what you need to know:
Parathas:
Recipe1: Mentions "...make sure you keep on regulating the temperature while frying as too hot the tava may burn the paratha".
Recipe2: Mentions "If the paratha sticks to the tava, it is not hot enough, if it become too dark quickly or burn it means it is too hot adjusting the heat accordingly".
Recipe3: Mentions "Ensure that oil is sufficient and paratha does not burn".

Naan:
Recipe1: Mentions "The secret to cooking a good naan is to cook it as fast as you can without burning it!".
Recipe2: Mentions "Do not let garlic naan get burned. Cook till it gets golden brown color".

Roti:
Recipe1: Mentions "Use your judgment as not to burn the roti off".
Recipe2: Mentions "cook the side down keeping an eye that it doesn't burn the roti on side down".

4 removed the call to "change the culture"
source | link

No they do not have to be burnt. Burning it is a sign that you need to adjust your cooking technique. Roti's and parathas can develop brown spots which are ok and very dark brown spots which are also ok. But if it is black and has a burnt taste, you can be sure the person cooking it has not exercised due care.

For those who love the smoky, burnt flavour: Yes, there are recipes of other dishes (like the burnt cake or the smoked brinjal) where the recipe explicitly mentions burning or smoking, so that you get that flavour. But that's not the case with parathas, naans and rotis.

Here's what you need to know:
Parathas:
Recipe1: Mentions "...make sure you keep on regulating the temperature while frying as too hot the tava may burn the paratha".
Recipe2: Mentions "If the paratha sticks to the tava, it is not hot enough, if it become too dark quickly or burn it means it is too hot adjusting the heat accordingly".
Recipe3: Mentions "Ensure that oil is sufficient and paratha does not burn".

Naan:
Recipe1: Mentions "The secret to cooking a good naan is to cook it as fast as you can without burning it!".
Recipe2: Mentions "Do not let garlic naan get burned. Cook till it gets golden brown color".

Roti:
Recipe1: Mentions "Use your judgment as not to burn the roti off".
Recipe2: Mentions "cook the side down keeping an eye that it doesn't burn the roti on side down".

Please convey this to people at homes and restaurants where they end up burning it. It is imperative that the culture changes, because currently, people are just taught to eat it as is.

No they do not have to be burnt. Burning it is a sign that you need to adjust your cooking technique. Roti's and parathas can develop brown spots which are ok and very dark brown spots which are also ok. But if it is black and has a burnt taste, you can be sure the person cooking it has not exercised due care.

For those who love the smoky, burnt flavour: Yes, there are recipes of other dishes (like the burnt cake or the smoked brinjal) where the recipe explicitly mentions burning or smoking, so that you get that flavour. But that's not the case with parathas, naans and rotis.

Here's what you need to know:
Parathas:
Recipe1: Mentions "...make sure you keep on regulating the temperature while frying as too hot the tava may burn the paratha".
Recipe2: Mentions "If the paratha sticks to the tava, it is not hot enough, if it become too dark quickly or burn it means it is too hot adjusting the heat accordingly".
Recipe3: Mentions "Ensure that oil is sufficient and paratha does not burn".

Naan:
Recipe1: Mentions "The secret to cooking a good naan is to cook it as fast as you can without burning it!".
Recipe2: Mentions "Do not let garlic naan get burned. Cook till it gets golden brown color".

Roti:
Recipe1: Mentions "Use your judgment as not to burn the roti off".
Recipe2: Mentions "cook the side down keeping an eye that it doesn't burn the roti on side down".

Please convey this to people at homes and restaurants where they end up burning it. It is imperative that the culture changes, because currently, people are just taught to eat it as is.

No they do not have to be burnt. Burning it is a sign that you need to adjust your cooking technique. Roti's and parathas can develop brown spots which are ok and very dark brown spots which are also ok. But if it is black and has a burnt taste, you can be sure the person cooking it has not exercised due care.

For those who love the smoky, burnt flavour: Yes, there are recipes of other dishes (like the burnt cake or the smoked brinjal) where the recipe explicitly mentions burning or smoking, so that you get that flavour. But that's not the case with parathas, naans and rotis.

Here's what you need to know:
Parathas:
Recipe1: Mentions "...make sure you keep on regulating the temperature while frying as too hot the tava may burn the paratha".
Recipe2: Mentions "If the paratha sticks to the tava, it is not hot enough, if it become too dark quickly or burn it means it is too hot adjusting the heat accordingly".
Recipe3: Mentions "Ensure that oil is sufficient and paratha does not burn".

Naan:
Recipe1: Mentions "The secret to cooking a good naan is to cook it as fast as you can without burning it!".
Recipe2: Mentions "Do not let garlic naan get burned. Cook till it gets golden brown color".

Roti:
Recipe1: Mentions "Use your judgment as not to burn the roti off".
Recipe2: Mentions "cook the side down keeping an eye that it doesn't burn the roti on side down".

3 deleted 452 characters in body
source | link

No they do not have to be burnt. Burning it is a sign that you need to adjust your cooking technique. Roti's and parathas can develop brown spots which are ok and very dark brown spots which are also ok. But if it is black and has a burnt taste, you can be sure the person cooking it has not exercised due care.

For those who love the smoky, burnt flavour: Yes, there are recipes of other dishes (like the burnt cake or the smoked brinjal) where the recipe explicitly mentions burning or smoking, so that you get that flavour. But that's not the case with parathas, naans and rotis.

Here's what you need to know:
Parathas:
Recipe1: Mentions "...make sure you keep on regulating the temperature while frying as too hot the tava may burn the paratha".
Recipe2: Mentions "If the paratha sticks to the tava, it is not hot enough, if it become too dark quickly or burn it means it is too hot adjusting the heat accordingly".
Recipe3: Mentions "Ensure that oil is sufficient and paratha does not burn".

Naan:
Recipe1: Mentions "The secret to cooking a good naan is to cook it as fast as you can without burning it!".
Recipe2: Mentions "Do not let garlic naan get burned. Cook till it gets golden brown color".

Roti:
Recipe1: Mentions "Use your judgment as not to burn the roti off".
Recipe2: Mentions "cook the side down keeping an eye that it doesn't burn the roti on side down".

Please convey this to people at homes and restaurants where they end up burning it. It is imperative that the culture changes, because currently, people are just taught to eat it as is.


ps: As this forum does not appreciate posting health related issues, I won't mention how eating such burnt food on a regular basis causes serious stomach problems. However, I am deeply saddened that people on this forum have not been open to examining possibilities and challenging culinary practices. To pursue cooking as an art, to be open to change and new ideas is what I hope the people in this forum would encourage in future.

No they do not have to be burnt. Burning it is a sign that you need to adjust your cooking technique. Roti's and parathas can develop brown spots which are ok and very dark brown spots which are also ok. But if it is black and has a burnt taste, you can be sure the person cooking it has not exercised due care.

For those who love the smoky, burnt flavour: Yes, there are recipes of other dishes (like the burnt cake or the smoked brinjal) where the recipe explicitly mentions burning or smoking, so that you get that flavour. But that's not the case with parathas, naans and rotis.

Here's what you need to know:
Parathas:
Recipe1: Mentions "...make sure you keep on regulating the temperature while frying as too hot the tava may burn the paratha".
Recipe2: Mentions "If the paratha sticks to the tava, it is not hot enough, if it become too dark quickly or burn it means it is too hot adjusting the heat accordingly".
Recipe3: Mentions "Ensure that oil is sufficient and paratha does not burn".

Naan:
Recipe1: Mentions "The secret to cooking a good naan is to cook it as fast as you can without burning it!".
Recipe2: Mentions "Do not let garlic naan get burned. Cook till it gets golden brown color".

Roti:
Recipe1: Mentions "Use your judgment as not to burn the roti off".
Recipe2: Mentions "cook the side down keeping an eye that it doesn't burn the roti on side down".

Please convey this to people at homes and restaurants where they end up burning it. It is imperative that the culture changes, because currently, people are just taught to eat it as is.


ps: As this forum does not appreciate posting health related issues, I won't mention how eating such burnt food on a regular basis causes serious stomach problems. However, I am deeply saddened that people on this forum have not been open to examining possibilities and challenging culinary practices. To pursue cooking as an art, to be open to change and new ideas is what I hope the people in this forum would encourage in future.

No they do not have to be burnt. Burning it is a sign that you need to adjust your cooking technique. Roti's and parathas can develop brown spots which are ok and very dark brown spots which are also ok. But if it is black and has a burnt taste, you can be sure the person cooking it has not exercised due care.

For those who love the smoky, burnt flavour: Yes, there are recipes of other dishes (like the burnt cake or the smoked brinjal) where the recipe explicitly mentions burning or smoking, so that you get that flavour. But that's not the case with parathas, naans and rotis.

Here's what you need to know:
Parathas:
Recipe1: Mentions "...make sure you keep on regulating the temperature while frying as too hot the tava may burn the paratha".
Recipe2: Mentions "If the paratha sticks to the tava, it is not hot enough, if it become too dark quickly or burn it means it is too hot adjusting the heat accordingly".
Recipe3: Mentions "Ensure that oil is sufficient and paratha does not burn".

Naan:
Recipe1: Mentions "The secret to cooking a good naan is to cook it as fast as you can without burning it!".
Recipe2: Mentions "Do not let garlic naan get burned. Cook till it gets golden brown color".

Roti:
Recipe1: Mentions "Use your judgment as not to burn the roti off".
Recipe2: Mentions "cook the side down keeping an eye that it doesn't burn the roti on side down".

Please convey this to people at homes and restaurants where they end up burning it. It is imperative that the culture changes, because currently, people are just taught to eat it as is.

2 added 185 characters in body
source | link
1
source | link