7 new link to interesting published research
source | link

I presume you are using fresh peanut oil and not already used for frying previously.

When you have half frozen meat going into hot oil, the first thing that would happen is that the ice would melt. The centre would stay at freezing point until all the ice turns into water. While that is happening, the melt water would carry water soluble proteins with it and leach into the oil. Meanwhile, that cold water would travel through the outer parts of the meat to cool down the heating from the hot oil and at the same time carry more proteins out into the oil.

What you see as foam is actually denatured protein leached out from the half frozen meat and acting as a surfactant. Think detergent in water and soap suds. This kind of foam can happen in water and with vegetables too.

This is quite a useful read. Interestingly there is no mention of proteins.

Main causes of foaming from this article:

  • Excess salt forming soap (I am unconvinced about the chemistry - you need an alkali not salt and fatty acid) [Edit - amines from decomposition of proteins and maillard products could act as a base for soap formation]
  • Prolonged high temperature causing cracking and polymerisation of cracked products
  • Dripping back of volatile components condensed on extractor filter
  • Used oil with polymerised cracking products
  • Overheating causing cracking and polymerisation of cracked products

Chemistry of deep-fat frying is a very interesting read but too much to summarise here.

I presume you are using fresh peanut oil and not already used for frying previously.

When you have half frozen meat going into hot oil, the first thing that would happen is that the ice would melt. The centre would stay at freezing point until all the ice turns into water. While that is happening, the melt water would carry water soluble proteins with it and leach into the oil. Meanwhile, that cold water would travel through the outer parts of the meat to cool down the heating from the hot oil and at the same time carry more proteins out into the oil.

What you see as foam is actually denatured protein leached out from the half frozen meat and acting as a surfactant. Think detergent in water and soap suds. This kind of foam can happen in water and with vegetables too.

This is quite a useful read. Interestingly there is no mention of proteins.

Main causes of foaming from this article:

  • Excess salt forming soap (I am unconvinced about the chemistry - you need an alkali not salt and fatty acid) [Edit - amines from decomposition of proteins and maillard products could act as a base for soap formation]
  • Prolonged high temperature causing cracking and polymerisation of cracked products
  • Dripping back of volatile components condensed on extractor filter
  • Used oil with polymerised cracking products
  • Overheating causing cracking and polymerisation of cracked products

I presume you are using fresh peanut oil and not already used for frying previously.

When you have half frozen meat going into hot oil, the first thing that would happen is that the ice would melt. The centre would stay at freezing point until all the ice turns into water. While that is happening, the melt water would carry water soluble proteins with it and leach into the oil. Meanwhile, that cold water would travel through the outer parts of the meat to cool down the heating from the hot oil and at the same time carry more proteins out into the oil.

What you see as foam is actually denatured protein leached out from the half frozen meat and acting as a surfactant. Think detergent in water and soap suds. This kind of foam can happen in water and with vegetables too.

This is quite a useful read. Interestingly there is no mention of proteins.

Main causes of foaming from this article:

  • Excess salt forming soap (I am unconvinced about the chemistry - you need an alkali not salt and fatty acid) [Edit - amines from decomposition of proteins and maillard products could act as a base for soap formation]
  • Prolonged high temperature causing cracking and polymerisation of cracked products
  • Dripping back of volatile components condensed on extractor filter
  • Used oil with polymerised cracking products
  • Overheating causing cracking and polymerisation of cracked products

Chemistry of deep-fat frying is a very interesting read but too much to summarise here.

6 added 108 characters in body
source | link

I presume you are using fresh peanut oil and not already used for frying previously.

When you have half frozen meat going into hot oil, the first thing that would happen is that the ice would melt. The centre would stay at freezing point until all the ice turns into water. While that is happening, the melt water would carry water soluble proteins with it and leach into the oil. Meanwhile, that cold water would travel through the outer parts of the meat to cool down the heating from the hot oil and at the same time carry more proteins out into the oil.

What you see as foam is actually denatured protein leached out from the half frozen meat and acting as a surfactant. Think detergent in water and soap suds. This kind of foam can happen in water and with vegetables too.

This is quite a useful read. Interestingly there is no mention of proteins.

Main causes of foaming from this article:

  • Excess salt forming soap (I am unconvinced about the chemistry - you need an alkali not salt and fatty acid) [Edit - amines from decomposition of proteins and maillard products could act as a base for soap formation]
  • Prolonged high temperature causing cracking and polymerisation of cracked products
  • Dripping back of volatile components condensed on extractor filter
  • Used oil with polymerised cracking products
  • Overheating causing cracking and polymerisation of cracked products

I presume you are using fresh peanut oil and not already used for frying previously.

When you have half frozen meat going into hot oil, the first thing that would happen is that the ice would melt. The centre would stay at freezing point until all the ice turns into water. While that is happening, the melt water would carry water soluble proteins with it and leach into the oil. Meanwhile, that cold water would travel through the outer parts of the meat to cool down the heating from the hot oil and at the same time carry more proteins out into the oil.

What you see as foam is actually denatured protein leached out from the half frozen meat and acting as a surfactant. Think detergent in water and soap suds. This kind of foam can happen in water and with vegetables too.

This is quite a useful read. Interestingly there is no mention of proteins.

Main causes of foaming from this article:

  • Excess salt forming soap (I am unconvinced about the chemistry - you need an alkali not salt and fatty acid)
  • Prolonged high temperature causing cracking and polymerisation of cracked products
  • Dripping back of volatile components condensed on extractor filter
  • Used oil with polymerised cracking products
  • Overheating causing cracking and polymerisation of cracked products

I presume you are using fresh peanut oil and not already used for frying previously.

When you have half frozen meat going into hot oil, the first thing that would happen is that the ice would melt. The centre would stay at freezing point until all the ice turns into water. While that is happening, the melt water would carry water soluble proteins with it and leach into the oil. Meanwhile, that cold water would travel through the outer parts of the meat to cool down the heating from the hot oil and at the same time carry more proteins out into the oil.

What you see as foam is actually denatured protein leached out from the half frozen meat and acting as a surfactant. Think detergent in water and soap suds. This kind of foam can happen in water and with vegetables too.

This is quite a useful read. Interestingly there is no mention of proteins.

Main causes of foaming from this article:

  • Excess salt forming soap (I am unconvinced about the chemistry - you need an alkali not salt and fatty acid) [Edit - amines from decomposition of proteins and maillard products could act as a base for soap formation]
  • Prolonged high temperature causing cracking and polymerisation of cracked products
  • Dripping back of volatile components condensed on extractor filter
  • Used oil with polymerised cracking products
  • Overheating causing cracking and polymerisation of cracked products
5 added 88 characters in body
source | link

I presume you are using fresh peanut oil and not already used for frying previously.

When you have half frozen meat going into hot oil, the first thing that would happen is that the ice would melt. The centre would stay at freezing point until all the ice turns into water. While that is happening, the melt water would carry water soluble proteins with it and leach into the oil. Meanwhile, that cold water would travel through the outer parts of the meat to cool down the heating from the hot oil and at the same time carry more proteins out into the oil.

What you see as foam is actually denatured protein leached out from the half frozen meat and acting as a surfactant. Think detergent in water and soap suds. This kind of foam can happen in water and with vegetables too.

This is quite a useful read. Interestingly there is no mention of proteins.

Main causes of foaming from this article:

  • Excess salt forming soap (I am unconvinced about the chemistry - you need an alkali not salt and fatty acid)
  • Prolonged high temperature causing cracking and polymerisation of cracked products
  • Dripping back of volatile components condensed on extractor filter
  • Used oil with polymerised cracking products
  • Overheating causing cracking and polymerisation of cracked products

When you have half frozen meat going into hot oil, the first thing that would happen is that the ice would melt. The centre would stay at freezing point until all the ice turns into water. While that is happening, the melt water would carry water soluble proteins with it and leach into the oil. Meanwhile, that cold water would travel through the outer parts of the meat to cool down the heating from the hot oil and at the same time carry more proteins out into the oil.

What you see as foam is actually denatured protein leached out from the half frozen meat and acting as a surfactant. Think detergent in water and soap suds. This kind of foam can happen in water and with vegetables too.

This is quite a useful read. Interestingly there is no mention of proteins.

Main causes of foaming from this article:

  • Excess salt forming soap (I am unconvinced about the chemistry - you need an alkali not salt and fatty acid)
  • Prolonged high temperature causing cracking and polymerisation of cracked products
  • Dripping back of volatile components condensed on extractor filter
  • Used oil with polymerised cracking products
  • Overheating causing cracking and polymerisation of cracked products

I presume you are using fresh peanut oil and not already used for frying previously.

When you have half frozen meat going into hot oil, the first thing that would happen is that the ice would melt. The centre would stay at freezing point until all the ice turns into water. While that is happening, the melt water would carry water soluble proteins with it and leach into the oil. Meanwhile, that cold water would travel through the outer parts of the meat to cool down the heating from the hot oil and at the same time carry more proteins out into the oil.

What you see as foam is actually denatured protein leached out from the half frozen meat and acting as a surfactant. Think detergent in water and soap suds. This kind of foam can happen in water and with vegetables too.

This is quite a useful read. Interestingly there is no mention of proteins.

Main causes of foaming from this article:

  • Excess salt forming soap (I am unconvinced about the chemistry - you need an alkali not salt and fatty acid)
  • Prolonged high temperature causing cracking and polymerisation of cracked products
  • Dripping back of volatile components condensed on extractor filter
  • Used oil with polymerised cracking products
  • Overheating causing cracking and polymerisation of cracked products
4 summarised link contents
source | link
3 added 124 characters in body
source | link
2 added 96 characters in body
source | link
1
source | link