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Locust Bean Gum mayLocust Bean Gum can also be used, for the same purpose. These
These vegetable gums are classed as "stabilisers". Basically, the fat molecules and the water were blended at the (hot) making, but they want to migrate apart. They do so very slowly in the freezer. 

Stabilisers such as Guar Gum, and Locust Bean Gum, and Xanthum Powder serve to reduce the speed of that migration. The effect is dramatic. 3
3 years ago, when starting our own ice cream production business, I wanted to see if we really needed to add the gums. I made a batch with, and a batch without the gums, and left them in the freezer for a month. We then tasted both. The one with gums seemed as good as the day after it was made, terrific. The one without gums had gone icy through and through. The

The gums are best mixed with sugar, and dry-mixed at that point very well. Then
Then add this mix to the still-cold milk mix. Do it slowly, or you will get lots of big lumps. Add when cold, as this helps as well, because the gums become more activated in their swelling as the mix warms. Be sure to blend very thoroughly once you have added the gums, and before heating the mix.

Locust Bean Gum may also be used, for the same purpose. These vegetable gums are classed as "stabilisers". Basically, the fat molecules and the water were blended at the (hot) making, but they want to migrate apart. They do so very slowly in the freezer. Stabilisers such as Guar Gum, and Locust Bean Gum, and Xanthum Powder serve to reduce the speed of that migration. The effect is dramatic. 3 years ago, when starting our own ice cream production business, I wanted to see if we really needed to add the gums. I made a batch with, and a batch without the gums, and left them in the freezer for a month. We then tasted both. The one with gums seemed as good as the day after it was made, terrific. The one without gums had gone icy through and through. The gums are best mixed with sugar, and dry-mixed at that point very well. Then add this mix to the still-cold milk mix. Do it slowly, or you will get lots of big lumps. Add when cold, as this helps as well, because the gums become more activated in their swelling as the mix warms. Be sure to blend very thoroughly once you have added the gums, and before heating the mix.

Locust Bean Gum can also be used for the same purpose.
These vegetable gums are classed as "stabilisers". Basically, the fat molecules and the water were blended at the (hot) making, but they want to migrate apart. They do so very slowly in the freezer. 

Stabilisers such as Guar Gum, and Locust Bean Gum, and Xanthum Powder serve to reduce the speed of that migration. The effect is dramatic.
3 years ago, when starting our own ice cream production business, I wanted to see if we really needed to add the gums. I made a batch with, and a batch without the gums, and left them in the freezer for a month. We then tasted both. The one with gums seemed as good as the day after it was made, terrific. The one without gums had gone icy through and through.

The gums are best mixed with sugar, and dry-mixed at that point very well.
Then add this mix to the still-cold milk mix. Do it slowly, or you will get lots of big lumps. Add when cold, as this helps as well, because the gums become more activated in their swelling as the mix warms. Be sure to blend very thoroughly once you have added the gums, and before heating the mix.

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Locust Bean Gum may also be used, for the same purpose. These vegetable gums are classed as "stabilisers". Basically, the fat molecules and the water were blended at the (hot) making, but they want to migrate apart. They do so very slowly in the freezer. Stabilisers such as Guar Gum, and Locust Bean Gum, and Xanthum Powder serve to reduce the speed of that migration. The effect is dramatic. 3 years ago, when starting our own ice cream production business, I wanted to see if we really needed to add the gums. I made a batch with, and a batch without the gums, and left them in the freezer for a month. We then tasted both. The one with gums seemed as good as the day after it was made, terrific. The one without gums had gone icy through and through. The gums are best mixed with sugar, and dry-mixed at that point very well. Then add this mix to the still-cold milk mix. Do it slowly, or you will get lots of big lumps. Add when cold, as this helps as well, because the gums become more activated in their swelling as the mix warms. Be sure to blend very thoroughly once you have added the gums, and before heating the mix.